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Groovy and Grails with Netbeans, Glassfish and MySQL

Yesterday I gave a talk at a the Ruby Jax User Groupon Groovy and Grails with Netbeans , Glassfish and MySQL. The Jacksonville JUG  was invited too, it was held at the hashrocket office , which has the best view I've ever seen from an office building:
beach.jpg

You can dowload the presentation here
Groovy and Grails with Netbeans , Glassfish and MySQL

Content:
     Grails Basics and Netbeans 6.5
     Domain-driven development with Grails
     Orchestrating requests with controllers
     Groovy Views with GSP
     configuring for MySQL
     running on Glassfish  

You can read more about the code examples here:

Building a Grails Pet Catalog using Netbeans 6.5 and MySQL

Combining Groovy, Grails, MySQL, and the Java Persistence API

Writing Your First Ruby-on-Rails Web Application

Sample Catalog Application using using JRuby and Rails





Developing MySQL-Backed Applications with Netbeans and Java RESTful Web Services

Yesterday I gave a webinar which talked about how to leverage the latest version of the Netbeans IDE to develop RESTful Web Services and clients deployed on Glassfish with MySQL. The talk gave an overview of the design process for a sample RESTful Pet Catalog service using JAX-R, and discussed how to build 3 sample clients for the Pet Catalog service,  one using the Dojo AJAX framework , one using Comet and one using JavaFX.

You can download the presentation  here:
Developing MySQL-Backed Applications with Netbeans and Java RESTful Web Services

you can watch  a 7 minute screencast on how to build a RESTful Pet Catalog using JAX-RS and dojo here

RESTful Pet Catalog screencast

You can read more about the example RESTful web service and the JavaFX client for the RESTful web service here:
http://developers.sun.com/appserver/reference/techart/cometslideshow.html
Glassfish and MySQL part 4

You can read more about the Comet client for the RESTful web service here:
RESTful Web Services and Comet

You can read more about the dojo client for the RESTful web service here:
a RESTful Pet Catalog

JAX-RS provides a standardized API for building RESTful web services in Java. Central to the RESTful architecture is the concept of resources identified by universal resource identifiers (URIs). The API  provides a set of annotations which you can add to Plain Old Java Objects (POJOs)  to expose web resources identified by URIs

Dojo

Here is a screencast about MySQL  for Developers

If you are a developer using MySQL, you should learn enough to take advantage of its strengths, because having an understanding of the database can help you develop better-performing applications. This session will talk about MySQL database design and SQL tuning for developers. Some topics include:
  • MySQL Storage Engine Architecture
  • Schema, the basic foundation of performance
  • Think about performance when choosing Data Types
  • Indexes and SQL tuning
  • Understanding SQL Statements using EXPLAIN
  • Scans and seeks
  • Solving performance problems in your queries
  • A Few Things to consider for JPA/Hibernate devlopers, Lazy loading and Optimistic locking


You can download the slides here
https://techdayscode.dev.java.net/servlets/ProjectDocumentList?folderID=9890

You can read more about this at
MySQL for Developers
GlassFish and MySQL, Part 4: Creating a RESTful Web Service and JavaFX Client
High Performance MySQL book
MySQL Pluggable Storage Engine Architecture
MySQL Storage Engine Architecture, Part 2: An In-Depth Look
Optimizing Queries with EXPLAIN
Java Persistence with Hibernate book
Jay Pipes blog 
Colin Charles blog
mysql performance blog
Ronald Bradford blog
Taking JPA for a Test Drive
Pro EJB 3: Java Persistence API
Pro MySQL, Chapter 6: Benchmarking and Profiling





This is the fourth article in a series of articles on GlassFish and MySQL.
In Part 4, you'll learn how to create a RESTful web service for the web
application. You'll also examine a JavaFX client for the RESTful web service. As
was the case for Part 3, the web service discussed in Part 4 uses GlassFish,
MySQL, and the Java Persistence API.

Glassfish and MySQL part 4

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