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kfarnham

JavaOne Day 3 Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 30, 2005

Reaching the breaking point

JavaOne is a conference not timid in its ambition. With keynotes as early as 8 AM and BoF's stretching until 11:30 PM, perhaps only ADHOC/MacHack is more determined to keep paricipants from sleeping. And on Day 3, participants who've been slamming down sessions, BoF's and walking the pavilion may finally be hitting the breaking point. It wasn't hard on this day to finally say "Enough!" and flop down in a beanbag chair in front of the big-screen JavaOne highlights in Moscone South, or in Moscone North with one of the XBoxes playing Halo 2 and Madden NFL 2005.

To cap the last three days of activity, JavaOne's "After Dark Bash" featured comedian Dennis Miller, an all-female Led Zeppelin cover band, and throngs of attendees trying to keep going. For those still determined to learn and share information, Birds of a Feather sessions offered a gathering of Jini developers, an editor's roundtable, and advice on writing a Java book, among many, many other topics.

The energy level has been high, and there is perhaps a sense of renewed optimism among certain segments of the Java population. Client-side Java sessions attracted many attendees, and a session showing how J2ME will be used to power the interactive features on Blu-Ray movie discs was completely sold out.

Day four wraps things up with James Gosling's address, the finale of the annual t-shirt hurling contest (one element of the conference that has been a bust compared to years prior), and a final slate of sessions. We'll probably also see attendees making a last run on the book store in Moscone North, and the gift shop under Moscone South. It's your last chance for a plushy Duke, as seen in the picture below (taken by Scott Schram).

http://photos15.flickr.com/22542990_b2ef220e7e.jpg?v=0

Reaching the breaking point  
kfarnham

JavaOne Day 1 Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 28, 2005

New names, old friends, and a roadmap

For many of us, JavaOne 2005 started off in the form of a line stretching out of the Moscone Center, around the Sony Metreon, and past the Yerba Buena Gardens. And I had arrived 15 minutes before the beginning of the general session. Given the stream of attendees I saw arriving as I waited, the end of the line was probably around the block and then some.

This year's general session included much welcome news, not the least of which was a detente between Sun and IBM - the latter having renewed its Java license for another 11 years - and the retiring of the confusing and often-mocked "Java 2" naming scheme, in favor of "Java Standard Edition 6", "Java Enterprise Edition 6", etc.

Java's ubiquity gained further credibility with numbers showing that far from "slowing", Java's reach is advancing in many key measurements: number of developers, number of licensees, and number of devices. On this last point, Sun's John Loiacono revealed that the number of Java-capable devices went up 42% last year and, for the first time ever, now outnumbers Java-capable PC's (and 708 million devices is not a small number either).

Members of the original "Green" team - the project that became Oak, and later Java - were invited up on stage with Scott McNealy and Duke to commemorate Java's 10th birthday, complete with a massive cake prepared for the occasion.

Looking to the future, Graham Hamilton offered a roadmap of Java SE's Mustang and Dolphin releases, and Bill Shannon toured the goals and features of Java EE's next version. Both are driven by JSR's, and Mustang's developments can be seen as it happens on theMustang snapshot releases project on java.net.

In the afternoon, JavaOne was its usual flurry of activity, with the roadmaps spelled out in greater detail in technical sessions (including one for Java ME, which was not previewed in the general session). The pavilion was packed with exhibitors, and the java.net booth was busy all day with mini-talks describing the many projects and communities on the site.

So that's some of what I saw, but what about what you saw? We hope you'll visit our JavaOne forums to discuss what you're seeing and doing at the show. These forums are open to all java.net members, so those who aren't at the show can join in the discussion too. The JavaOne 2005 Discussion is for discussions of happenings at the show, while the Java One 2005 Links is where you can add links to JavaOne content you've seen around the web.

New names, old friends, and a roadmap  
kfarnham

The Power Game Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 27, 2005

JavaOne is underway, with a lenghty Monday morning general session laying out the future of the Java SE and Java EE platforms. I took dutiful notes, for use in a show recap that will appear onONJava Wednesday night. When it was over, my battery had about a 21% charge.

That's when it hit me: there are no power stips in the public areas

Last year's JavaOne was generous with the access to power - my routine was to lounge by the video games atop Moscone South, plug in, and recharge.

Not so this year. I've already developed an eagle eye for spotting spare outlets: hey, there's a strip poking out from under that table... hey, there's a free outlet on the strip powering those XBoxes... hey, if I unplugged this SunRay, do you think anyone would notice?

Unless the situation is particularly better in the session rooms, we're going to have a whole bunch of dead batteries and unhappy campers early this afternoon.

I'm writing from the press room, which has a few strips hidden under the tables - battery now at 47% - but that's not a solution to everyone else who mingles in public areas. I'm thinking very seriously about walking up to CompUSA and buying a power strip to lug around this week so I can share what few outlets I find with others.

BTW, if you find a good source of recharge power, don't hoard! Please post it to the talkbacks!

kfarnham

Dear Friends Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 24, 2005

Join us, in person or online, for next week's JavaOne happenings

Not all Java developers go to JavaOne. This is important, so let me repeat it: not all Java developers go to JavaOne. Sometimes we in the computer media get so focused on the major announcements, new software releases, and other activity that are timed to match the conference, that we may be overlooking the fact that the huge majority of Java developers don't want, don't need, or just can't make the pilgrimage to San Francisco in late June. For you, we'll be changing the front page next week, as we did last year, to provide a rolling view of what's happening at the conference. We'll have blogs, coverage from around the web, and other frequently-updated Java news. Think of it as all the excitement of JavaOne, without waiting for 2,000 people ahead of you on the Moscone Center escalators.

On the other hand, if you will be at JavaOne, we hope to see you. The java.net presence in the pavilion will offer a Community Corner where you can learn about hosting and managing your project on java.net, meet community leaders, and learn about other projects in the form of 30-minute Mini-Talks.

We're also hosting an event Tuesday night, open to all java.net members. Please join your fellow java.net members at the Java Communities in Action event Tuesday June 28 at 6 PM at the Argent Hotel in San Francisco. The event is free and you need not attend JavaOne to participate in this event.

Also in today's Projects and Communities section, the Java User Groups now have a mascot: Juggy, the Java Finch. JUGs Community co-leader Eitan Suez introduces Juggy in his blog I believe I can fly ;-), noting that Juggy has been donated to all JUGs under a Creative Commons license.


Chet Haase has some information about JavaOne Desktop Sessions in today's Weblogs. "I don't know about you, but I find conference program guides and websites somewhat difficult to use. There are just so many sessions in so many different areas that it's tough to wade through the universe of possibilities and figure out where I'm actually supposed to be at any given time (besides looking for a good cup o' coffee, of course). To that end, we wanted to give you a condensed guide to the Desktop sessions at the conference."

Felipe Leme has an idea: SOIA - Specify Once, Implement Anywhere: "Have you ever wondered how hard it is to switch the implementation for a JCP-based technology? Here is my recent experience on the JSF arena."

Doug Kohlert notes that the JAX-WS 2.0 RI Early Access 2 is now available. "This version of JAX-WS provides support for SOAP 1.2, MTOM. This is also the first implementation of a dynamic runtime that does not rely on non portable artifacts."


In Also in Java Today, JavaServer Faces provides an alternative to Struts or Spring MVC for those who want a Web application framework that manages UI events in a Java Web application. JSF is now a standard part of the J2EE specification and provides a viable alternative to non-standard Web frameworks. In Face Up to Web Application Design Using JSF and MyFaces, Javid Jamae looks at how JSF works and has a surprising opinion on whether it's ready for mission-critical use.

Are you developing Java web services? Then consider this: "Web services are increasingly becoming an integral part of next-generation web applications. They're also vulnerable to attacks. The nature of these attacks is the same as for traditional web applications, but the modus operandi is different. These attacks can lead to information leakage; further, they aid in remote command execution." What's your defense option? In the ONLamp Security DevCenter article Securing Web Services with mod_security, Shreeraj Shah shows how to deploy and configure the Apache mod_security module to defend against common forms of attack, without changing your source code.


In today's Forums,jwenting disagrees on the subject of Some important classes missing: "Java is modular. There's libraries out there that can do just about everything you want if you go looking. I'm sick and tired of this 'XXXX should be in the core API because YYYY has it' (or 'because I use it a lot and therefore everyone needs it NOW!!!!'). The core APIs are bloated and have way too much crud as it is, and it looks to only be getting a LOT worse."

cowwoc has a request for Automatic proxy settings for normal applications: "I know that Mustang and Tiger now support automatic proxy settings for applets, but why can't we also auto-import these settings from the OS browsers for normal applications? That is, if I'm running a standalone application, why can't Java check the registry (or wherever else it's stored) for the proxy settings and import them on demand? Is there a big difference here between applets and normal applications?"


In today's java.net News Headlines :

Registered users can submit news items for the java.net News Page using our news submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to thejava.net News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Join us, in person or online, for next week's JavaOne happenings  
kfarnham

Find Your Way Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 23, 2005

A path to radically simpler webapp development.

By this point, most developers have heard about Ruby on Rails, a web application framework that has generated a level of enthusiasm and advocacy not seen in some time. Java has multiple frameworks - competition is good after all - some of them fairly light-weight and some, um, not. But RoR is about more than casting off the shackles of XML deployment descriptors: it's about the idea of "Domain Driven Development", allowing the developer to focus on modelling business logic and not managing relationships between various parts of the framework. If only someone would bring that to Java...

In our Featured Article,RAD That Ain't Bad: Domain-Driven Development with Trails, Chris Nelson introduces the Trailsproject, hosted on java.net, as a Ruby-on-Rails-inspired Domain-Driven Development webapp framework. He shows how straightforward it is to create simple business objects as POJO's and immediately get a webapp that provides the typical means of manipulating those objects via a web interface.


Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein is answering complaints about Bloated Mustang? in today's Weblogs. He writes: "Build 40 of Mustang was the first drop with the first significant new API additions. And the inevitable happened as some people started to complain about the addition of 'useless' features: who needs Web Services, Javascript or an HTTP server? Why Javascript instead of [put favorite language here]? Some of these features are indeed hard to justify in J2SE, if we miss the big picture."

John Reynolds is predicting good things as Java Business Integration, JSR 208, passes final ballot: "JSR 208, will probably lead to a new crop of JBI-based ESB (Enterprise Service Bus)offerings. For me, JBI's advent will probably be a really good thing. SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) is a paradigm, not a product. I've bought into the SOA paradigm hook-line-and-sinker, but getting from vision to reality has proved difficult."

"GlassFish has its first external commitor, Jacob Hookom! Wait, how is that possible? It's only been a couple of weeks?" In GlassFish external commitor, Carla Mott has the answer.


In Also in Java Today , Narayanan A.R. says "I have been developing software systems using object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques for many years. So when I read that aspect-oriented programming (AOP) addresses many problems that traditional OOP doesn't solve completely or directly, I wanted to better understand its benefits in real world application development." In Aspect- vs. Object-Oriented Programming: Which Technique, When?, he attacks a case study with both OOP and AOP techniques and makes a line-by-line comparison of the two approaches.

The Java 2D is not a new API, but you can use it to create some stunningly high-quality graphics with Java technology. The Java 2D API is easy to use and includes features such as image processing, alpha-based compositing, antialiasing, geometric transformations, international text rendering, and even support for advanced printing. In Learning Java 2D, Part 1, Robert Eckstein introduces the concepts Java 2D uses to render on-screen components.


In Projects and Communities, the Java Communications Community project Mobicents, an open-source implementation of JAIN SLEE, is celebrating its recent certification, having passed the JAIN SLEE TCK. Mobicents is a professional VoIP platform that is applicable to other low-latency problem domains, such as financial trading and online gaming.

The JavaServer Faces reference implementation is now available under the Java Development License (JDL). Ed Burns' blog entry about the development describes the upshot for JSF implementors, and he has updated the project FAQ so you can choose JDL or JRL before checking out code.<


Today's Forums, offer an interesting idea in Proposal: Annotation @Optional. User mcnepp writes "I have a proposal for a new standard annotation. This annotation would present a standard way of declaring interface methods as 'optional'. @Optional would replace those tedious JavaDoc comments 'this is an optional operation' just like @Deprecated will supersede the corresponding JavaDoc-tag."

rogerhernandez reports Build problems with user names: I ran into two build problems because my user name has a space in it: 1) In Sanity.gmk, in the check for the unicows.lib size[...] The script should probably use 'echo $(USERNAME) | wc -w' to set the size offset 2) In hotspot-rules.gmk, building the hotspot compilers [...]"


In today's java.net News Headlines :

Registered users can submit news items for the java.net News Page using our news submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to thejava.net News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



A path to radically simpler webapp development.  
kfarnham

This is Your Story Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 21, 2005

Too big for a single book

Yesterday, Daniel blogged on Tim O'Reilly's blog entry The Rise of Open Source Java, which noted an upturn in Java book sales, attributable to both a Tiger-timeframe refresh of popular titles, and to major open-source projects based on Java, such as Spring, Struts, Lucene, and AspectJ.

One of the talkbacks caught my eye, and not in a good way:

Doesn't this suggest that Java has maintained or increased in complexity, thereby requiring one or more books on a variety of topics for one to do anything useful? And that the Java community has failed to provide adequate documentation and support?

At this point, I'm finding that it is impossible to be productive in Java without several books. As opposed to working with Ruby, where Dave Thomas' book is pretty much all needs (unless you go the Rails route, then you'll be lost without one of the half dozen books due this summer. )

On its face, this is almost self-discrediting: by acknowledging the difference between language and libraries in the Ruby world, he immediately shows why a basic Java text can't also teach you how to use JSP's or Swing, any more than reading Kernigham and Ritchie will teach the budding C programmer how to write an app that uses CORBA, QuickTime, or some other third-party library.

But the more interesting idea is the suggestion that it is the community that is responsible for providing documentation and support, and that the Java community is lacking. It's hard to imagine someone seriously leveling this accusation at the Java community, where every public API is expected to have publicly-available Javadocs (and anyone with the source can generate those docs easily), where most frameworks and libraries with significant traction are covered by feature articles and tutorials on sites like java.net and others, and where those resources are collected at one-stop shops like CodeZoo.

To top it off, isn't the number of books proof that the community is providing documentation and support? True, books aren't free, but given that the average book costs less than the average Java developer makes in an hour, and given that we authors do have mortgages and health insurance to pay for, the situation seems fair to me.

Is the Java community doing enough to document and support its many frameworks and libraries? Is that even a fair expectation? Let's hear what you have to say in the talkbacks below...


In our Featured Article, Nigel Warren and Philip Bishop apply SOA principles in the small device realm. In Taking Service Oriented Architectures Mobile Part One: Thinking Mobile, they describe how to implement SOA onto mobile devices, show how to implement a simple messaging application using mobile SOA design principles, point to some of the security implications and how to handle them.


In today's Weblogs. Greg Murray has someBluePrints for writing JSF Components that use AJAX: " This entry discusses different strategies for AJAX enabling new and existing JSF components. "

N. Alex Rupp is scoffing at "an odd story on news.softpedia.com this evening about how ISO 18629 is going to grant computer programs the ability to reason." In Software Language Makes First Step Towards AI? Hardly, he writes: "don't buy the hype -- it's bad reporting, and I'll tell you why."

Krishnan Viswanath writes: "I always thought that the Hash implementations (table & map) used buckets that are prime in number." In Hashmap Implementation, he writes: "But, recently, after digging around the source code to see what that default size is resulted in a bit of a puzzling situation."


In Also in Java Today, NewsForge's Nathan Willis laments the Decline and Fall of the Version Number: "The world used to make sense. As the first rays of dawn broke over the horizon, farmers strode nobly into their fields of grain to reap the harvest of an honest season's living, while across the country programmers put to rest another night's coding and packaged a well-honed x.0 release, wistfully watching it bound off into the Internet to replicate blissfully on the mirror servers. People everywhere were happy. Then our version numbers collapsed. There was chaos. Some numbers got longer and longer. Some turned into letters and words. Some became dates. Nobody knew what the numbers meant anymore. People were afraid to ask what the numbers meant, and they became afraid of numbers themselves."

Are you tired of building and maintaining toString() methods for all your data classes? In Automate run time classfile modification, consultant Dennis Sosnoski shows how you can automate the process using J2SE 5.0 annotations and the ASM bytecode manipulation framework. He takes advantage of the new J2SE 5.0 instrumentation API to invoke ASM as classes are loaded into the JVM, providing on-the-fly class modification at run time.


In Projects and Communities, you may be aware that periodic builds of the next major version of Java are posted to the J2SE 6.0 (Mustang) Snapshot Releases project, but do you have a good idea of what's in Mustang? The article Core Java Technology Features in Mustang describes the major new features and bug fixes, and whether they've already been integrated.

The latest Java Tools Community Newsletter notes the graduation of two projects from the community incubator: jTrac, a web-based generic tracking tool, and ThinNB, which provides Thinlet support to NetBeans by housing ThinNB NetBeans modules and installing the ThinNB Update Center in the NetBeans IDE.


In today's Forums,bartspedden asks about Unit Testing JAXB Objects: "I need to write some unit tests with junit to validate that two JAXB objects are identical. I've read that the .equals() on the JAXB object will not work here for some reason. I could write a sorter to sort the object data and then implicitly test each attribute, but that seems like the wrong approach since the JAXB object could change. I've gotten one idea of using the Jakarta EqualsBuilder but I figured I would post a question here to see how you all test your JAXB objects."

philrace clarifies some issues Re: Getting kerning: "In general, we can't assume simple pairwise kerning, though most of the time that's what we'll be getting from the fonts, so this may be too simple. Since it's quite possible you may want to use kerning in conjunction with ligatures, how do you expect to handle that? The fonts describe kerning pairs in terms of glyphs not chars."

In today's java.net News Headlines :

Registered users can submit news items for the java.net News Page using our news submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to thejava.net News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Too big for a single book  
kfarnham

Countdown Crunch Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 17, 2005

One work week until JavaOne

Whether or not you're going to JavaOne, it would be hard not to notice the flurry of activity as the event looms (one work week away, at this point). News editor Steve Mallett e-mailed me and Daniel the other night to express his surprise at how many news items were available for the front page. I noted that two of his news items were for "RC1" releases of projects... perfectly timed for a JavaOne release after a final week of testing. For everyone working hard to get your stuff out the door in time, here's wishing you the best, and hoping you get a break after the crunch.

For those of you who won't be at JavaOne, Max Goff wants to help improve the blog coverage of the event. In today's Weblog entry, Blogging JavaOne, he writes: "There should be a plethora of bloggers at JavaOne this year, which is only a couple of weeks away (June 27-30). With Microsoft co-opting ... I mean co-sponsoring the event, it promises to be an even more interesting gathering than any previous Java celebration. Is there anything in particular you would like to see a blogger from java.net cover at JavaOne this year?"

Tom Ball talks about presenting Project Jackpot at JavaOne: "I will be giving a JavaOne presentation on Project Jackpot: A New Java Technology for Source Transformation, and have been working hard on a NetBeans plug-in to demonstrate it. I am really excited to be able to finally discuss our work to such a wide audience."

Ed Burns has a jumpstart on using java.net for your JSR: "This is what we did with JSP and JSF to host our projects on java.net."


In Also in Java Today, the Sun Developer Network article What's New in the Sun Java Wireless Toolkit 2.3 beta outlines the new features and APIs in the latest version of the Sun Java Wireless Toolkit. You'll learn about the toolkit's support for the Location API, SATSA, and the Content Handler API. Read the article to learn how you can create MIDP applications that discover their location, communicate with smart cards, respond to specific content types, and more.

Whether you're targeting it with your web application, writing client-side DHTML or AJAX code for it, or just using it to surf the web, chances are you're aware of Firefox, the lean, fast browser from the Mozilla Foundation. But how much of its functionality are you really using? In the Mozilla DevCenter article A Firefox Glossary Brian King (contributor to Firefox Hacks) describes the terminology and concepts of this compelling client.


In Projects and Communities, Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart's latest weblog entry announces: JAXP Builds now available. "The JAXP team has just posted early accessbuilds of JAXP 1.3 and of JAXP 1.4. Specific JAXP 1.3 builds will eventually show up in GlassFish builds, while JAXP 1.4 will be in Mustangbuilds, but having separate builds will allow more flexible uses."

The GELC is spotlighting SchoolClipse, a tool for managing a small private school. In Project Spotlight: SchoolClipse, project owner Stavros Kounis talks about the project as a "playground" for developing rich-client platform applications, as well as the project's current status and goals for the future.


User cowwoc has a problem with Mustang's system tray icon feature in today's Forums. In Re: Able to show balloons from system tray icon?, he writes: "The problem is that Sun chose not to expose an API which allows end-users to specify whether a window may or may not overlap the taskbar. They simply may not, period. If you look at the underlying Tray API code, what Sun does is use reflection to get at a private variable, change its value and this allows that specific window to display on top of the taskbar. If Sun wants to hack its own code, great, but we end-users shouldn't have to."

hr_stoyanov is looking for more depth in Re: WS-SECURITY in JAX-WS 2.0?: "What about the other WS-* security protocols: WS-TRUST, WS-SecureConversation SAML and XrML. Is there a roadmap of what to expect in JAX-WS in future? Are there JAVA.NET hosted OSS projects to provide some implementation?"


The latest java.net Poll asks "Have you ever run a Java Web Start application?". Cast your vote on the front page, then join in the discussion on the results page.

In today's java.net News Headlines :

Registered users can submit news items for the java.net News Page using our news submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to thejava.net News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



One work week until JavaOne  

Isn't this great? Well, you can't have it yet.

I need a new laptop. I switched to a desktop last year, but now JavaOne and a late-summer working vacation are looming, and I'll need portability. I'm only looking at Mac portables, because I think life is too short and too precious to use anything less. Problem is, while Steve Jobs got the Mac fans enthusiastic about Intel-based Macs the other week, his company isn't going to actually sell them for another year. So now I'm looking at buying into a dead-end technology... and given Apple's previous behavior, they will use a system update to push users off PowerPC at some point, perhaps sooner than I'd like. Plus, the current iBooks use a lousy video card that can't do certain high-end tricks that I might want to play with while I'm on the road (I'm a Java guy by day, but I do have an increasingly native dark side when it comes to media programming).

So what I want isn't ready. I need to work with what's out there today.

I'm not the only one waiting for good things to come down the pipeline. In today's Weblogs, Chet Haase talks about the the Multi-Tasking Virtual Machine (MVM), why it's so exciting, and yet why it's not in Mustang. In Mmmmmm VM..... he writes: "Finally, I get down to the question of 'Why isn't it in the platform yet?', or more specifically, why isn't MVM going to be included in Mustang? Well, frankly, it's always a question of tradeoffs, just like any software project. [...] Given the niche category that I've backed this technology into [...] is it a critical feature that we should focus on in preference to some other Mustang feature?"

In Bean Browsing with JXPath, Rich Unger writes: "Here's a little trick I've found useful for browsing the contents of my JAXB model, though it works just as well with any java beans. It's a GUI for testing JXPath expressions on a given Object."

Ben Galbraith writes about some SVG Goodness: "After a long time rotting on the W3C website, SVG is finally getting some uptake... and Java is well-positioned to take advantage of the fun. Thanks to the Batik project, Swing applications can embed gorgeous (and often interactive) SVG files into their UIs today."


In Also in Java Today, John Zukowski discusses assistive technologies in his Core Java Tech tip Accessibility and the Java Access Bridge. The good news is that "Provided you configure your Swing components properly, everything related to the javax.accessibility package happens behind the scenes. Accessibility aids are connected to the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) on a platform. When a user loads a program through the JVM with an attached aid, the Java Accessibility API provides the necessary information to the device in use." You do, however, need to consider what features you will be supporting e.g. accelerators or mnemonics.

Killer Game Programming in Java author Andrew Davison is still playing movies in his 3D world. In Playing Movies in a Java 3D World, Part 2, he takes his Java 3D-based movie-playing application and replaces the Java Media Framework movie-playing functionality with one based on QuickTime for Java. Thanks to an MVC design, it's not too difficult: "as a consequence of the design pattern, the replacement of JMF by QTJ has little effect on the application--only the movie class (JMFSnapper) departs, replaced by a QuickTime for Java version called QTSnapper."


In Projects and Communities, Greg Sporar's weblog NetBeans Day: Even more cool stuff has the rundown on new presentations added to the schedule for Net Beans Day, to be held Sunday, June 26, one day before JavaOne kicks off. Greg's highlights include demos of the NetBeans profiler, Project Matisse, and Project Looking Glass.

Heads up to members of the Java Enterprise Community: BEA is hosting a 30-minute online session today called Service Infrastructure in the Enterprise, discussing the deployment and management of service-oriented architectures (SOA's). The event will be held today at 9 AM and 7 PM Pacific, and the sign-upis available online.


In today's Forums,bino_george discusses AWT and Swing issues in Re: Able to show balloons from system tray icon? He writes: "If you have tried the JDIC version, you will remember that we used JPopupMenu instead of PopupMenu there and the reason you mentioned was exactly why we did it that way. Unfortunately, a lot of people were unhappy aout some of the quirks of JPopupMenu (such as not overlapping the task bar). Also since the API is in AWT, we did not want to have a dependancy on a Swing API from AWT. Typically, we do it the other way around."

User skelvin says the Splashscreen does not automatically close and asks: "Not yet implemented or bug? Javadoc says 'It is closed automatically as soon as the first window is displayed by Swing/AWT'. Yet, it does not close unless explicitly closed."


In today's java.net News Headlines :

Registered users can submit news items for the java.net News Page using our news submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to thejava.net News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Isn't this great? Well, you can't have it yet.  
kfarnham

Prepare to Qualify Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 14, 2005

A naming convention you won't soon forget

Overly generic names are a hazard for programmers. J2SE 5.0 already has multiple Timers, Dates, andDocuments, and it doesn't take much to overload such common terms as Node or Component. In ajava.net Forums message, user zixle, discussing Mustang's table sorting API, notes that "We are rapidly running out of non-overloaded names in the JDK. From one perspective RowSorter has a model, that is called Model."

You can, of course, go the other way. Today's feature article discusses a database benchmarking framework called "PolePosition", that takes its naming conventions to an extreme, and arguably past it. A series of tests is a "circuit" (sometimes also caled a "racecourse"), each test is a "lap", and the code to execute calls to a database or other persistence system is, of course, a "driver". Thus, you run the drivers through a set number of laps on the circuit to determine the winner. You can almost hear the TV announcer calling out "db4o goes inside, he's trying to get around Hibernate on the turn!"

You can say this for Pole Position: nobody's going to confuse it with an XML parser anytime soon.

In our Featured Article,An Open Source Database Benchmark, Rick Grehan takes a look at PolePosition, which describes itself as "a benchmark test suite to compare database engines and object-relational mapping technology." He writes: "the impetus behind PolePosition came from the observation that developers evaluating candidate databases for future applications often resorted to constructing ad hoc benchmarks rather than using "canned" benchmark tests (or relying on vendor-provided data). This is entirely understandable; to properly evaluate a database for a specific project, you would want to exercise that database in ways that correspond to the application's use of it."


Upcoming Mustang improvements are front and center in today's Weblogs. Stanley Ho writes about Security and networking enhancements in Java Deployment: Most of the enhancements are already integrated into Mustang... the remaining enhancements will be available in a Mustang snapshot in a few weeks.

Grzegorz Czajkowski writes about Releasing the Multi-Tasking Virtual Machine: The actual technology has proven relatively easy to implement and the original release was planned for early 2005. Well, so much for the plans. A whole bunch of items crept in, all the way from legal issues to handling large code releases on java.net

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announces JAXP 1.4 at Java.Net: The CVS repository for the JAXP 1.4 Reference Implementation just went live at Java.Net in the JWSDP community. One of the nice things of this JAXP 1.4 implementation is that it provides a ready-to-use package that combines the StAX implementation with SAX and DOM implementations and all the benefits of JAXP 1.3 (like validation).


In Also in Java Today , author and analyst Richard Monson-Haefel has some serious second thoughts about JAX-RPC. In fact, his latest blog entry is entitled JAX-RPC is Bad, Bad, Bad! He continues: "There I've said it. It wasn't as painful as I thought it would be to admit that the subject of my last book, J2EE Web Services, is a terribly flawed piece of technology. I'm glad I wrote that book, I think it has helped a lot of people understand a very, very complex Java technology (i.e. JAX-RPC), but I'm sorry that JAX-RPC and the rest of the J2EE Web services stack became the standard for Java web services."

Matt Asay, of Novell's Open Source Review Board, has written a NewsForge opinion piece in which he asks Does 'community' still exist in open source? Noting that many of the gear-heads and hackers that used to represent open-source have been hired by corporations interested in OSS, he writes "in our rush to commercialize Linux and other open source projects, we tend to cloud the community aspect, which obviates many of the benefits vendors (and customers) derive from open source in the first place. Word-of-mouth marketing, supra-corporate QA testing, etc. These benefits disappear when community is trampled in the rush to commercialize open source."


In Projects and Communities, Jini technology has a new licensing model, with recent specifications and implementations (like the Jini Technology Starter Kit 2.0.2) licensed under the Apache License v. 2.0. In Sun opens the Jini Licensing Model, Bill Venners discusses this change with Jini team members Jim Hurley (also a community contact for the java.net Jini Community) and Bob Scheifler.

An interesting success story from the JXTA Community: Boeing has decided to use JXTA as part of of its Future Combat System (FCS) for the U.S. Army. A Boeing VP was quoted as saying that "JXTA technology ensures that services registered can be found quickly and efficiently." FCS is a networked "system of systems" the Army hopes will increase its agility and reduce logistics needs.


In today's Forums,bino_george shows off another Mustang feature in Re: Able to show balloons from system tray icon?: "All you have to do is call trayIcon.displayMessage("Caption", "This is an example of Notifications", type); where type is one of:TrayIcon.MessageType.ERROR (an error message),TrayIcon.MessageType.INFO (an information message)TrayIcon.MessageType.NONE (simple message), orTrayIcon.MessageType.WARNING (a warning message). Check out the javadoc. You can try it out with b38 and above."

uncle_alice shares Two reasons why AA text doesn't work in Mustang: "When I first ran my home-grown editor app under Mustang-b40, neither the textarea nor the line-number gutter was displaying AA text (although they work fine under Tiger with the "swing.aatext" property set). I finally figured out what the problems were, and thought I'd share what I learned."


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A naming convention you won't soon forget  

IM's between me and Cooper a few weeks back:

                                       
Cooper:Stupid question nobody seems to know... Do you know how to find out the free space available on a filesystem from java?
Me:ah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
Cooper:I take it you have seen that before?
Cooper::-=
Me:I'm looking up the RFE for you
Me:suffice to say, for now, you're Runtime.exec()'ing a du and scraping stdin.
Cooper:Well, that will be a very cross platformy thing now won't it?
Me:ah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

Well, I guess I can take the "ha " out of my clipboard now, because the Sun bug-bot sent me an e-mail to say that Bug 4057701 (Need way to find free disk space) has been closed as fixed.

The bug report shows it as being fixed inmustang(b39), and thanks to the mustang project on java.net, you can check it out for yourself. And I literally mean you, because I'm on a Mac and thus can't build Mustang.

Still, it's a huge relief that after all this time, this embarrassing oversight/omission is finally being resolved. And by "finally", it's worth nothing that Thursday would have marked eight years to the day after the bug was filed.

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