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I've compiled the following schedule of JavaOne technical sessions, BOFs, and ancillary events where members of the java.net community will be presenting during JavaOne week. This schedule does not include the java.net Community Corner events that will be taking place at the java.net booth in the JavaOne Pavillion.

Here's the current java.net community's JavaOne week presentations schedule:


Java.net Community Sessions during JavaOne Week

Tuesday, June 2

             
TimeJN MembersSessionNotes
7:30 - 8:30 pmFrank KievietBOF-6730: What Is and Will Be New in OpenESB?


 

Wednesday, June 3

                                                
TimeJN MembersSessionNotes
9:45 - 10:45 amJesse Glick, Kohsuke KawaguchiTS-5301: Continuous Integration in the Cloud with HudsonJesse and Kohsuke created Hudson
2:50 - 3:50 pmFrank KievietTS-5123 SOA at Enterprise Scale: Solving Real Challenges with GlassFish ESB
5:00 - 7:00 pmPaul SterkGlassFish Web 2.0 and Scripting Demoat the "Glassfish Sneak Peek at Java EE 6 Ancillary Event," St Regis Hotel Gallery I Ballroom, 125 3rd Street, San Francisco, California
6:45 - 7:35 pmRoger Brinkley, Terrence BarrBOF-6731: Mobile and Embedded Lightning Talks
7:45 - 8:35 pmOpenESB teamBOF-5004 OSGi and the Enterprise Service Bus: Friend or Foe?
7:45 - 8:35 pmKohsuke KawaguchiBOF-5105: Hudson Community Meet-Upa get together for Hudson users and developers


 

Thursday, June 4

                                         
TimeJN MembersSessionNotes
9:30 - 10:30 amOpenESB teamTS-4839 Enterprise Integration Patterns In Practice
6:30 - 7:20 pmJava Champions, JUG Leaders and Dream TeamBOF-3904This is a panel discussion between Java Champions/JUG Leaders/NB Dream Team members with Sun's Software Execs (Execs confirmed to attend: Sun's VP of Java Client Platform (Jeet Kaul) and Jim Parkinson who is the Engineering VP for Cloud Services, Kenai, and Zembly). Community Panelists: Kirk Pepperdine, Mattias Karlsson, and Wade Chandler.
6:30 - 7:30 pmBrian Boyes, Brian Jenkins (Robotics Community)BOF-5369 "Swarm of Brian"We will mainly be presenting work done in the Greenfoot simulator, where we are proving concepts which will be added to the actual robots.
7:30 - 8:20 pmDan Sline, John YearyBOF-5394: Improving the Java User Groups (JUGs)
8:30 - 9:20 PMAlexei UshakovBOF-3992 Meet the Team Behind JWebPane, and Learn Advanced Tips and Tricks


 

Friday, June 5

            
TimeJN MembersSessionNotes
1:30 - 2:30 pmMatt Warman et al.PAN-5388: Making Music with the Java

The Java.net Spotlight area in the right column of the front page is being used to highlight JavaOne related news as the conference proceeds. Here's what has been spotlighted thus far:

  • Sid just published a schedule of OpenSSO events during JavaOne week: "Join us Sunday May 31st, for OpenSSO Community Day at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. It's our 'unconference' before the main conference and discussions will include OpenDS and Identity Connectors. Just show up prepared to talk about any topic related to Sun's open source identity projects. As always attendance is free. Join our Meetup to participate in this discussion..."

As these past couple weeks passed, I began to realize that there was a lot more I wanted to write in advance of JavaOne than was going to be possible. Today is no different. I have to leave soon to catch my plane. So, what I was planning on writing here this morning will have to wait until tonight or tomorrow.

Which brings up a relevant topic: what you'll see on the Java.net front page and in my blogs in the coming week. For me, JavaOne week is indeed a week-long event. I'll be attending java.net events, and I'll be in the pavillion at the java.net booth for most of Community One and JavaOne (while also, probably, slipping away for a session or two). In the java.net booth, we have a lot of visitors who will be stopping by to give mini-talks, demos, and record podcasts (this what I really wanted to write about today; I'll get to it soon, though).

So, I will indeed be busy, starting on Saturday, all the way through next Friday. Throughout this entire period, I intend to be very active in blogging and updating the java.net front page with news and blogs from java.net community members who are at the conference. In fact, I'll be updating the java.net front page every day (multiple times on most days) between now and the end of the JavaOne conference.

So, if you want to follow the conference on java.net, you may want to check in a few times each day. I can't predict exactly when the front page will be refreshed with new content, but I'll be scanning the java.net Weblogs regularly, and you'll see a lot more than our standard three blogs per day. This may happen starting tonight (assuming there are no complications with my trip).

In addition, I plan to do some posting on my personal java.net blog. And I'll be using Twitter (@diyincite) regularly, for the first time ever...

Now, I really do need to run! More tonight, from my hotel room in San Francisco...


In Java Today, the Java Desktop Community points out an interesting new Product Announcement: Chart FX 7 for Java Desktop Features". From their release blurb: "Chart FX 7 for Java Desktop is the most complete charting solution for your Swing-based apps. It provides all the advanced features you've come to expect from Chart FX with minimal integration efforts on both Eclipse & NetBeans IDEs."

The Java Tools Community announces JavaTools Community Twitter: 'If you are interested in news about Java development tools, you can follow the JavaTools Community Twitter. Just follow the Twitter address @javatools and you'll receive the latest news about development tools directly from JavaOne. See our Twitter page for more information.'

And the Mobile and Embedded Community highlights Wednesday's JavaOne 2009 keynote: Sony Ericsson to reveal mobile Java strategy: "Sony Ericsson is picking up the pace at JavaOne 2009 with a keynote session on June 3, 2009. The audience will be the first to hear about our mobile Java strategy and how to do business by developing mobile Java applications for existing and future Sony Ericsson phones."


In today's Weblogs, Simon Morris writes about Thinking Declaratively in JavaFX: "JavaFX is likely to be, once again, a major player at JavaOne, prompting even more of the 'Java Faithful' to try it out. This posting looks at a core difference between Java and JavaFX Script, and the impact it has on the code we write."

Kumar Jayanti provides instruction on Overriding WebServiceContext in Metro to handle security related methods: "Overriding the WebServiceContext in Metro to handle security related methods in a container specific way. One of the design goals of Metro is to be able to run on any Application Server as a WebServices Stack. One project that i know levarages this ability is OpenSSO. The OpenSSO product is supported on several application servers..."

And Ludovic Champenois has posted the Worst ever Java EE 6 Blog: "This is the worst ever Java EE 6 Blog...Stop reading now... I'm preparing some Java EE 6 JavaOne demos. While doing that, I was thinking: how can I compress most of the Java EE 6 technology inside *one* single Java Class? ..."


In the Forums,chrjohn has a question involving GF2.1 cluster - requests answered by both instances - load balancing?: "Hi, I have setup a simple cluster and deployed an application to it. The application has a TimerBean and some other SLSBs, a few queues. Kind of basic stuff. My question is, if I now start the timer then it fires one time on instance1, then maybe three times on instance2, then again on instance1, yada-yada-yada. The same is for the beans, sometimes a bean from instance1 is taken, sometimes from instance2. This seems to me like some kind of load-balancing. Can I disable this? Can I configure it in a way that always one instance is taken, unless that instance is down or unreachable? ..."

Ray Martin initiated an extended conversation on JNI/CompositeApp/Glassfish: "Does anyone have a JNI application running in Glassfish? I have a third party JNI app (Netica). It runs fine from the command line. i have an EJBModule and a BPEL project added to a composite app. The composite app is deployed to Glassfish and runs fine - receiving and responding to SOAP message. i then add the JNI app to the EJBModule and deploy the composite app to Glassfish. there are two SOAP messages to the composite app - setup and activate. i issue the setup message - the request and response occur. i issue the activate message - the JNI app runs - all is good - the results are stored..."

And sfitzjava responded Re: Display - Best practice: "doing all of these static calls, and memory segment changes to address remotely located variables is not only a lot of typing but also can cause performance issues on small devices. There are dozens of possible ways to address this depending on your desires. I use my project MicroBus.dev.java.net to handle this decoupling of classes by use of messaging. On one side I have an event, which fires a message, the other an object that registers for listening to for given messages. That would be major overkill for your needs. To help with performance/addressing issues you can add an instance variable..."


The current Spotlightis my attempt to create a catalog of http://weblogs.java.net/blog/kfarnham/archive/2009/05/javanet_communi.html">Java.net Community Presentations at JavaOne 2009: "I (Kevin Farnham, java.net editor) am planning to post a schedule of presentations, panel sessions, and BOFs that will be given/led by members of the java.net community. If you lead or participate in a java.net project or a java.net community, and you'll be giving a technical session, participating on a panel, or leading a BOF, leave a comment on my blog, and I'll add your session information to my list."


This week's java.net Poll refers to Project Vector, which Sun's Jonathan Schwartz blogged about last Monday. Our poll question asks: "Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?" The poll is being extended for a day or two, due to my Friday flight schedule.


Our Feature Articles include Gary Benson's just published Zero and Shark: a Zero-Assembly Port of OpenJDK, which tells the interesting story of how the Java group at Red Hat developed a cross-platform OpenJDK port; and Protect Your Legacy Code Investment with JNA, by Stephen B. Morris, which introduces Java Native Access (JNA) and demonstrates how it can be used to facilitate interaction between Java programs an native libraries, for example Windows DLLs.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 79: JavaOne 2009 Preview, in which JRoger Brinkley and Terrence Barr preview JavaOne 2009 for mobile, media and embedded developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



As these past couple weeks passed, I began to realize that there was a lot more I wanted to write in advance of JavaOne than was going to be possible...  
While JavaOne is certainly the focus of the coming week's activities in San Francisco, there are many other Java-related events during the week, including Community Leaders' Weekend at JavaOne. This will be the formal kick-off of JavaOne week for many people in the Java.net community, including the Java.net staff and leaders of several of the most active java.net communities.

 

While the event isn't open to everyone, it is open to all java.net Community Leaders. Community Leaders' Weekend will take place as an Un-Conference. So, if you're a member of a java.net community, and there are specific topics that interest you, feel free to suggest them to your community's leader. The event takes place on Saturday, May 30 (just two days from now), so you'll want to forward any suggestions to your community leader soon.

Thus far, the confirmed attendees include leaders from the Robotics Community, the Java Tools Community, the Mobile & Embedded Community, and Java User Groups. I've heard that other community leaders will also be attending, but I don't have the details at this time. I'll be getting up early Saturday morning after my long cross-country flight on Friday, to be in attendance.

I've always liked the un-conference format. I attended multipleMashUp Camps, and at some of the larger conferences I attended (OSCON and Web 2.0) there were also mini-unconferences scheduled within the larger conference. The fact that unconferences typically take place in a single room means that, from wherever you stand, you can quickly assess what's going on, and note which particular demos or mini-talks are currently garnering the greatest attention.

Then, there are all the interesting little side conversations that take place at almost random locations. And anyone is invited to walk up and listen in and/or contribute to any conversation.

Hmm.. that makes the physics wheels in my head begin to churn: wouldn't it be an interesting study to come up with a model of how people move about the room in an unconference? It would be so much more interesting than studying people's movements in a standard conference, where at set times huge throngs of people move from one room to another...

The best thing about the unconference format is that you can "taste" a bit of everything that's going on. Unfortunately, just like standard conferences, unconferences suffer from the problem of "too much good stuff." In standard conferences, there are always more sessions you wish you could attend than is possible; or, multiple sessions that you really want to attend take place simultaneously. In the unconference format, you don't have exactly this problem, because the presenters are always willing to backtrack and re-state or re-demo their stuff for the latest set of visitors to their station. But, still, unconferences typically end with you wishing you had seen more of X, Y, and Z...

Anyway, I'm very much looking forward to starting my JavaOne week on Saturday with Community Leaders' Weekend.


In Java Today, The JavaTools Community has published JavaTools Community Newsletter - Issue 197: "A new edition of the newsletter is available, with news, new projects and tips! If you want to receive the newsletter by email, please subscribe the announcements mailing list - or read the current issue here."

In Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 4 Developer Preview (9M3063), In a message to the java-dev mailing list, Apple's Matt Drance has announcedJava for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 4 Developer Preview (9M3063). "A new developer preview of Java for Mac OS X Leopard is now available athttp://connect.apple.com. Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 4 updates Java SE 6, Java SE 5.0 and J2SE 1.4 to deliver improved reliability, security, and compatibility. This preview requires Mac OS X 10.5.6 or later. This build has received only limited testing and should not be installed on a system with critical data. For more details, please see the Release Notes."

Sergey Malenkov has published a JavaFX tutorial on Using Advanced Deployment Features: "Many real-world applications retrieve data through web services, then parse and visualize them. For example, WeatherWidget application displays weather forecasts from the Yahoo! Weather RSS feed. This article explores additional features for deploying JavaFX applications available in the JavaFX SDK and the NetBeans IDE for JavaFX technology..."


In today's Weblogs, Roger Kitain postedICEFaces 2.0 And JSF 2.0 Together: "The JSF 2.0 specification is now in the final voting stage. This version of the specification defines how JSF frameworks integrate with Ajax. The Ajax integration portion of the specification was the result of a consolidated effort from an expert group that also included leaders from the major JSF Ajax frameworks such as ADF Faces/Trinidad (Oracle), ICEFaces (ICESoft), RichFaces (JBoss/Red Hat). ICESoft has already introduced ICEFaces 1.8 that runs on JSF 2.0, although it doesn't take advantage of any of the new features of JSF 2.0. I am happy to report that ICEFaces 2.0 is in the works and it leverages the extensibility points defined in the Ajax integration portion of the JSF 2.0 specification."

Kirill Grouchnikov investigates Animation blueprints for Swing: "Using project Trident to add animations to enable rich interactivity expected from modern Swing applications: Over at Pushing Pixels i have ran the series on adding animations to enable rich interactivity expected from modern Swing applications. The code is part of the Onyx project which aims to provide blueprints for animated Swing applications powered by theTrident animation library, and the series has covered the following..."

And Felipe Gaucho has prepared his JavaONE Warm Up - how to create Web-Services clients?: "As any technology merchant I am bringing to javaONE some incomplete wonders for your appreciation, including a RESTful web-service looking for a fancy GUI. Five days to the number one Java conference in the world, including the Moscone effervescent Pavilion, smart people, marketing, music, sandwiches, and a full week of opportunities to make business and to have fun. As usual, I am going to San Francisco looking for the best offerings of JavaONE regarding Java knowledge, and of course I have my own pack of spices to expose over there. During the last few days, an impressive number of e-mails had arrived in my mail box about what we can see or try at JavaONE..."


In the Forums,haraldk continues the conversation Re: JTabbedPane: Components before and after the tabs themselves.: "Hi Endre, I've been working on a more "browser" kind of tabbed pane for a while (hobby project, might appear on dev.java.net some day). The idea is to support features needed by browser kind of apps, like "new tab", "close tab", overflow, scrolling, dragging to reorder etc. I started out customizing the JTabbedPane, and it IS possible to add buttons and other widgets to it. However, I figured it wasn't worth the extreme code complexity and the ugliness of all hacks needed. So I went back to a simple JComponent with CardLayout, implementing the tabs behavior myself, and it's so much more comfortable to work with. I suggest you do something like that too..."

peter_budo asks about Display - Best practice: "What is best practice in handling movement from screen to screen in midlet? My teacher at university wasn't able to explain this to me, could be due to that he chuck whole 300+ lines in one file. Secondly none of the books or tutorials that I read so far went on discussing this. So here is how I do it and I would like to know if my approach is correct and if not I would like to know how to handle this correctly..."

And mickelson would like to know how to find a WSDL Web Service address: "Hi. I have a question that I have seen many people having, but no answer yet. It seems an easy question. In the wsdl for an Web Service, there is a wsdl:address, this address as presented for whom needs to make a client is the address of the local computer, but if the computer is NAT then the address is not as it is presented for the client. I have noted that it is possible for a client to do something like((BindingProvider)proxy).getRequestContext(). put(BindingProvider.ENDPOINT_ADDRESS_PROPERTY, "..."); My problem is that I don't know the clients and so don't know how to tell them that they need to do this. Can someone tell me how I could resolve this..."


The current Spotlightis my attempt to create a catalog of Java.net Community Presentations at JavaOne 2009: "I (Kevin Farnham, java.net editor) am planning to post a schedule of presentations, panel sessions, and BOFs that will be given/led by members of the java.net community. If you lead or participate in ajava.net projector a java.net community, and you'll be giving a technical session, participating on a panel, or leading a BOF, leave a comment on my blog, and I'll add your session information to my list."


This week's java.net Poll refers to Project Vector, which Sun's Jonathan Schwartz blogged about last Monday. Our poll question asks: "Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?" Today is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include Gary Benson's just published Zero and Shark: a Zero-Assembly Port of OpenJDK, which tells the interesting story of how the Java group at Red Hat developed a cross-platform OpenJDK port; and Protect Your Legacy Code Investment with JNA, by Stephen B. Morris, which introduces Java Native Access (JNA) and demonstrates how it can be used to facilitate interaction between Java programs an native libraries, for example Windows DLLs.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 79: JavaOne 2009 Preview, in which JRoger Brinkley and Terrence Barr preview JavaOne 2009 for mobile, media and embedded developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



While JavaOne is certainly the focus of the coming week's activities in San Francisco, there are many other Java-related events during the week...  

I'd like to write a blog and/or post a schedule of presentations, panel sessions, and BOFs that will be given/led by members of the java.net community.

If you're a member of the Java.net community (for example, you lead or participate in a java.net project or a java.net community) and you'll be giving a technical session, participating on a panel, or leading a BOF, leave a comment below, and I'll add your information to my list.

Please identify which java.net community you lead/represent, so I can include that in my posted schedule. You can post just your Session ID(s), or post a comment about the session(s) as well.

I plan to refer back to the posted schedule as the conference week proceeds, highlighting what's coming up the next day in the java.net Daily Editor's Blog.

A lot of people are blogging about either the presentations they'll be making at Community One and JavaOne or the sessions they recommend and hope to attend. Yesterday I noticed that Fabrizio Giudici's Community One and JavaOne conference plans illustrate that you can experience the conferences as focusing on cloud computing -- there are enough sessions and panels and BOFs centered on the cloud to do that.

In today's Weblogs, Terrence Barr looks at JavaOne from a mobile, media, and embedded point of view. In the post, Terrence highlights three Mobility Hands-on Labs, the Mobile and Embedded Lightning Talks (BOF-6731) [note: a few slots are still available], four panel discussions, and 38 techinical sessions and BOFs.

Clearly, no one is going to be able to attend everything on Terrence's list (he himself says he "will try to attend at least some of these").

Scan the recent java.net blogs, and you'll find all kinds of posts relating to JavaOne 2009, including:

In addition, Java Mobility Podcast 79 is a JavaOne 2009 Preview, a talk given by Roger Brinkley and Terrence Barr.

Warning: don't read further...

If you've ever had a problem getting the Dire Straits song "Money for Nothing" out of your head, please do not read further. Instead, click here to return to thejava.net home page.

Still reading? OK, you can't say I didn't warn you. Last, but not least, in the java.net blogs, there's John Ferguson Smart's mesmerizing (if you dare to let yourself get into it) and, hence, dangerous:

Have you stopped hearing Mark Knopflersing

Lines of code for nothin' get your screens for free

yet? OK, good. Now, let's get back to work. Because there's a lot of that left to do, and only a few days left before the "shows" begin!


In Java Today, Jim Weaver delves into a new feature in JavaFX that is available from the OpenJFX-compiler side of the technology, in Referencing Multi-Dimensional Java Arrays from JavaFX: "You probably know that the next version of JavaFX is expected to be released around JavaOne 2009. Did you know, however, that the latest build of the JavaFX compiler is always publicly available so that you can play with new language features? ..."

In 15 Minutes or Less: JavaFX Effects and Components (Screencast), Robert Eckstein, of the Sun Developer Network, presents a quick screencast tour of some of the various effects and components available in the new JavaFX language, all in 15 minutes or less.

Bruce Hopkins talks about Creating Interactive TV Applications With the Tru2way Platform and OCAP in his recent article: 'If you're reading about the Tru2way platform for the first time, you might be asking yourself the question, "Is it really possible to have a Java-enabled TV?" Or, better yet, "Is it possible to put a JVM machine inside my cable set-top box?" The answer to both questions is yes, and you don't have to wait 5 or 10 years for this technology to come to fruition because it's already available today in millions of homes throughout the United States...'


In the Weblogs, JavaOne is featured. Terrence Barr posted JavaOne 2009: A Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Guide to the Show: "JavaOne 2009 - here it comes! Last week I posted some high-level bits and pieces about this year's CommunityOne West and JavaOne. Now it's time to delve into details - with a mobile/media/embedded focus, of course! This post is a work in..."

Chet Haase writes about his upcoming JavaOne session on Reanimation: "Join Romain Guy and I at JavaOne 2009 as we explore ideas in GUI animation. Our talk this year will be a bit different from past years. First of all, it will be less about nitty-gritty code and more about concepts as we explore higher-level ideas of animation and what we can learn and apply from traditional cartoon animation to animated GUIs. Secondly, Romain will be be dressed in a gorilla suit...."

And Amy Fowler will be presenting a session on Layout, Controls, and Hybrids at JavaOne: "Looking forward to presenting an update on FX layout at JavaOne. To follow up my article on JavaFX layout, I'll be presenting a section on layout at our JavaOne session on FX UI Controls. At this session, Richard, Jasper, and I will talk in detail about new apis which make it easier to build amazing interfaces: TS-5578 The New World: JavaFX Technology-Based UI Controls..."


In the Forums,safiahlberg has questions regarding LWUIT co-existing with LCDUI - Possibly a solution to the menu problem?: "We are currently implementing a part of our application using LWUIT, but since our application uses many screens we want to migrate from LCDUI (using canvases with custom paint) progressively. We have had trouble when switching from LWUIT forms to LCDUI, the menu animation seems to trigger a repaint of the LWUIT form so that the LCDUI screen does not appear (in certain situations). We have searched this forum and there seems to be others with the same problem but we can't find a solution, we have tried to set the transition animations to null and some other calls to the API and overriding the affected methods but with no success..."

nightzero is working on a problem involving a Database view with JPA for jdbc realm: "Hi, I have an application that uses form based security. The realm used is JDBC Realm. I have the entities User and Group for the JDBC realm. All database tables for the application are created when I deploy the application. For User and Group entities the tables users, groups and user_group is created. user_group is just a relation table to avoid redundancy by putting the username in the groups table. However, glassfish jdbc realm implementation requires username to be in the same table as the group name. To solve this it is usually suggested to use a database view, that selects usernames from users table and group names from groups table... "

And elaltaico asks about how to color whole Container on LWUIT: "Hello. My form's layout is BoxLayout and it has two container whose layouts are BoxLayout. I can create layouts successfully but the problem is I am not able to color a Container. My MIDlet's color is white and I want to color my firstmidlet black and second midlet blue. I can color labels and buttons (which are located at containers) successfully but when I color them the bottom of he labels becomes white.(becose MIDlet's layout is white) Is there a function or a method to color whole Container? You can see how I implemented my Containers..."


This week's Spotlightis Janice J. Heiss's article The Developer Insight Series, Part 3: The Process of Writing Code. Janice talks to developers about the process of writing code: "Over the years, I've heard developers talk about their favorite code, funniest code, most beautiful code, how to write code, how not to write code, the obstacles to writing good code, what they love and hate about writing code, and so on. In the process, I've encountered many insights worth sharing. Parts One and Two of this series provided advice on how to write good code. In Part Three, developers reflect on the actual process of writing code, how it happens, what it feels like, and how they do it."


This week's java.net Poll refers to Project Vector, which Sun's Jonathan Schwartz blogged about last Monday. Our poll question asks: "Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?" Voting is open through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Gary Benson's just published Zero and Shark: a Zero-Assembly Port of OpenJDK, which tells the interesting story of how the Java group at Red Hat developed a cross-platform OpenJDK port; and Protect Your Legacy Code Investment with JNA, by Stephen B. Morris, which introduces Java Native Access (JNA) and demonstrates how it can be used to facilitate interaction between Java programs an native libraries, for example Windows DLLs.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 79: JavaOne 2009 Preview, in which JRoger Brinkley and Terrence Barr preview JavaOne 2009 for mobile, media and embedded developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



A lot of people are blogging about either the presentations they'll be making at Community One and JavaOne or the sessions they recommend and hope to attend...  

In looking at the personal Community One and JavaOne schedule Fabrizio Giudici recently posted, I was struck by the frequency of the the word "cloud" in his planned schedule. On Monday, June 1, at Community One, Fabrizio will be attending "Practical Cloud Computing Patterns." At JavaOne, he'll be attending "Google App Engine: Java Technology in the Cloud" (TS-3817) on Tuesday; "Continuous Integration in the Cloud with Hudson" (TS-5301), "Enterprise Build and Test in the Cloud" (TS-4230), and "Cloud Computing and NetBeans IDE Enable Army Research Lab's Next-Generation Simulation System" (BOF-4638) on Wednesday; and "Matchmaking in the Cloud: Hadoop and EC2 at eHarmony" (TS-5082) on Thursday.

What struck me about this was the fact that I was certain that cloud computing is not one of the "core" topic areas that are headlined in the formal JavaOne 2009 literature. If you look at the official list of JavaOne topics, you see:

  • Rich Media Applications and Interactive Content
  • Mobility
  • Services
  • Core Technologies

Where is the cloud in there? Well, it is there, actually, spread across multiple topics. For example, in the Rich Media topic:

... on the desktop the lines between local and network computing have grown increasingly blurry as content steadily migrates into the cloud.

Consumers have become increasingly comfortable letting their online activities move into the cloud...

And in the Services topic, you find:

The advent of cloud computing also offers core services such as identity, profile, social graph, etc. ...

In addition, cloud computing eliminates the need for companies to host and manage their applications on their own IT resources.

This topic area will address how the developer community can utilize SOA, Web-Oriented Architecture, Enterprise Integration, Open Services, and cloud platforms to more simply, rapidly, and economically build and deploy enterprise and consumer applications.

The cloud is also tucked into one of the subtopics listed for Services: "Web 2.0, Next Generation Web, and Cloud Services Platforms," which includes "Design & Deployment of Services in the cloud, including best practices for deploying services across mobile, desktop and TV Java Platforms." And the cloud is mentioned under "Cool Stuff" in the Services category:

New approaches such as ESB, SCA and Java Business Integration (JBI). Innovation in next generation web services and cloud platforms, clever application of technologies to craft new services, solutions or applications.

The hiddenness of cloud computing within the Services topic area may explain why the "Services" category didn't earn more votes in our poll last month that asked Which of the technologies highlighted at JavaOne 2009 is of greatest importance for the future of Java? In that poll, less than 5 percent of the votes were cast for the "Services" category. If I had put "Cloud Computing" into the poll instead of "Services", I'll bet we would have seen quite a different result.

Browsing the JavaOne 2009 schedule of sessions, there are about 10 sessions that have the word cloud in their title, including the very interesting sounding panel session "Cloud Computing: Show Me the Money" (PAN-5366). The panel members in this session are Jeff Barr (Amazon.com), Jeff Collins (Intuit), Adam Gross (Salesforce.com), Simon Guest (Microsoft), Gregor Hohpe (Google), Raghavan Srinivas (Intuit), and Lew Tucker (Sun).

So, perhaps cloud computing doesn't have a sufficiently significant presence at JavaOne 2009 to warrant it being one of the headline topics you'd select if you had to break down all the JavaOne content into just four topic areas. But, it's still one of the major topics that will be discussed at the conference.

And, surely cloud computing will kind of lurk in the background in many technical sessions where it is not explicitly discussed, since the cloud is where a lot of new technology will be implemented, especially by start-ups. For start-ups, constructing and maintaining a rock-solid, scalable data center of their own is a distraction from the more important focus on developing their core product or service. Hence, for start-ups, contracting services from a cloud provider makes a lot of sense. And since start-ups by nature tend to apply the latest technology, you can see that a lot of the new Java technology that will be discussed at JavaOne will end up being implemented on the cloud. At least, that's howI'd do it if I was starting a web-based business today.


In Java Today, Peter Karich provides a survey of Code Quality Tools in Java: "There are several tools to measure the code quality. The ones I have tried with a lot of success are: FindBugs (latest version 1.3.8) -- uses static analysis to look for bugs in Java code.This is a great tool, it discovered possible NullPointerExceptions and a lot more bugs in my projects. Sometimes I asked myself how this program could have discovered this 'complicated' bug..."

In memcpy() concurrency curiosities, David Dice recently worked on a problem involving http://blogs.sun.com/dave/entry/memcpy_concurrency_curiosities: "I was recently asked to diagnose a problem a customer was encountering that involved Java and the JNI getIntArrayElements() and releaseIntArrayElements() primitives. The outcome of the exploration was sufficiently interesting that I thought I'd mention it here in order that other JNI users might avoid the same pitfall. Briefly, the customer was running a highly threaded application on a machine with lots of available concurrency. The Java threads would repeatedly read..."

In Groovy in One Day, Anthony Goubard teaches Groovy in One Day": "After JavaFX, now let's have a look at Groovy. Note that I already had a quick look at it when 1.0 has been released and I wrote one of the XINS Web Servicesdemo using Groovy. Installation: The Getting started guide page tells us to download the installer and set up some environment variables.The default install directory is..."


In today's Weblogs, John Ferguson Smart talks about his upcoming session at JavaOne: Getting Serious About Build Automation: Using Maven in the Real World: "This year, I'll be talking at JavaOne about Getting Serious About Build Automation: Using Maven in the Real World (TS-3941): Maven 2 is becoming increasingly popular in larger organizations looking to standardize and industrialize their build processes as well..."

Gary S. Weaver has been Peering into the Pit of Jar Hell: How Symlinks to Jars Can Make You Run Screaming: "Using symlinks to jars in order to save space at first sounds reasonable, but when you don't use proper version names, it is indeed a practice invented by the devil himself. How could it ever be justified?"

And Fabrizio Giudici looks ahead in Ten days to Community One and JavaOne: my talk and my plans: "In ten days the mother of all Java events will be held in San Francisco, anticipated by the Community One. As usual, tons of interesting speeches - completely involved in some heavy work, I was forgetting that you have to..."


In the Forums, Shai Almog responds to a question Re: Stopping a Motion: "Hi Alex, without looking at the source code this can be pretty difficult. Motion.isFinished will return false when a motion is complete, you can theoretically derive a motion but I would advised against it. In LWUIT components we usually have one motion which we just replace if the user pressed a key hence the new destination takes over. See how this works in List.java where multiple key presses "slide" very nicely. We just replace the pointer instance of Motion which is more similar to your solution..."

chris_rvm asks how to Send User Credentials from WCF Client to GlassFish Services: "Hi All, Can someone please help me find a solution to the following problem? I tried looking online but none of the posts were helpful. Requirement: We have a system where WCF Client communicates to Glassfish Server. For each WCF request that is sent to the Glassfish webservice, we want to send the username and password from WCF Client (using WS* Standards) and then retrieve the username/password on the WSIT services so that we can perform our own authentication. Is this possible? If so, can anyone please provide the steps to do so asap? ..."

And cballantyne is having problems with Glassfish v2 - JNDI - String or Properties or Bean: "Hi All, I am trying to do something that I thought would be quite straightforward but after a lot of googling and trying things I am getting nowhere. Maybe I am doing something stupid. I have about 20+ tabs open now with forum posts and articles showing different ideas. Basically we need to store Strings in JNDI for a number of application variables. I don

Our just-closed poll showed that interest in this year's JavaOne Conferenceis high, despite the economic situation (which is surely keeping many people who wish they could attend at home). There were 332 votes c ]]>

How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?

  • 7.5% (25 votes) - I'll be at the conference
  • 22.8% (76 votes) - I'll follow the conference closely online
  • 48.1% (160 votes) - Once they're posted, I'll review some of the podcasts and presentations online
  • 19.8% (66 votes) - I have no interest in JavaOne 2009
  • 1.5% (5 votes) - Other

I'm hoping that the 25 voters who will be at the conference stop by at the java.net booth, and perhaps attend one of the Community Corner events we'll be hosting.

My main mission during the conference (the way I see it) is to keep everyone who can't attend but who wants to follow the conference as informed as possible. That's the reasoning behind my informal java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network. And I'll be blogging frequently, scanning what other people are writing, interviewing members of the community in Community Corner podcasts, trying to get those online in a timely manner, etc.

I may also find a few spare minutes to attend a technical session or panel session in the greater conference beyond the java.net booth. If anyone who's not attending the conference has some specific panel discussions / roundtable sessions they wish they could attend, let me know, and I'll see if I can go to those sessions and report on what I heard.

New poll: Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?

Our new poll takes its title (slightly modified) from Monday's blog post by Sun's Jonathan Schwartz, Will the Java Platform Create The World's Largest App Store?. Jonathan's post includes a video, along with his blog text.

So, what's Project Vector? Jonathan says it's "a project we're planning to unveil at this year's JavaOne":

Vector is a network service to connect companies of all sizes and types to the roughly one billion Java users all over the world. Vector (which we'll likely rename the Java Store), has the potential to deliver the world's largest audience to developers and businesses leveraging Java and JavaFX...

Most folks don't think of Sun as a consumer company, and largely we're not, but our runtimes reach more consumers than just about any other company on earth. That ubiquity has obvious value to search companies, but it's also quite valuable to banks looking to sign up new accounts, sports franchises looking for new viewers, media companies and news organizations looking for new subscribers - basically, any Java developer looking to escape the browser to reach a billion or so consumers.

How will it work? Candidate applications will be submitted via a simple web site, evaluated by Sun for safety and content, then presented under free or fee terms to the broad Java audience via our update mechanism. Over time, developers will bid for position on our storefront, and the relationships won't be exclusive (as they have been for search). As with other app stores, Sun will charge for distribution - but unlike other app stores, whose audiences are tiny, measured in the millions or tens of millions, ours will have what we estimate to be approximately a billion users. That's clearly a lot of traffic, and will position the Java App Store as having just about the world's largest audience.

So, our new poll asks: "Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?" Yes, I know it's difficult to really answer this before the details are available. But, just thinking about the concept as expressed by Jonathan, surely a lot of us have an guess as to whether or not we think this thing will fly. Vote in the poll and let us know what you think.


In Java Today, Greg Wilkins writes about JSR-315 progress in 'Servlet 3.0 Proposed "Final" Draft': "In my December 2008 blog, I strongly criticised the Servlet 3.0 JSR-315 process and the resulting Public Review Draft... Perhaps because of these harsh words (or more probably in spite of them), JSR-315 has become significantly less discordant and some good technical progress has been made. While I remain somewhat concerned..."

Sun's Elena Blokhina sent me details about the Galaxy FX JavaFX game that is underway in Russia and the CIS: "The contest aims at young & experienced developers, students - all those who are interested in learning new technology. Year of 3009. You are a free miner in the outer space. The only technologies available to you are robot explorer and JavaFX. Your goal is to collect resources scattered across the Universe. Competitions are held everyday, best algorythm wins. Ratings are renewed daily & valid within the given time period. There are 3 time periods. People who get the highest rating within each period and in the final battle, will be awarded!" See the Rules and registration pages to get started.

And Nati Shalom talks abouthttp://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/javax/xml/bind/annotation/XmlType.html#propOrder()),that says "All of the JavaBean properties being mapped to XML Schema elements must be listed."..."

mikekey continues a conversation Re: WSIT with Spring and Tomcat: "Andreas, Thanks for the pointer. I fixed that issue and now the service deploys cleanly again. However now I'm back to my original issue...I see no options other than Transport when I try to add client side options for WS-RM to my client...and the service does not appear to have any WS-RM configuration to it. I set the following in catalina.properties: shared.loader=file:///Users/mikey/apps/metro/lib/*.jar and ensured those files existed there. I have not changed anything else with the service, it still has the above service definition section for WSIT and specifically for me WS-RM..."

And bjornf is seeing an error jax-ws - maven plugin NoClassDefFound error with scope provided: "Hi, I have a strange problem with the jax-ws maven plugin , wsgen goal. It generates a NoClassDefFoundError when i set some dependencies asprovided. The error can also be f.e: error: Could not create declaration for annotation type javax.ejb.Remote error: Could not create declaration for annotation type javax.ejb.Stateless error: Could not create declaration for annotation type javax.interceptor.Interceptors. if i set the j2ee jar as provided. Not sure why cause i think it should work with provided ,it's also strange since it seems to work for a collegue of mine , the only difference is that he's using Windows XP. Another collegue has the same problem but she's using Vista as i'm doing..."


This week's Spotlight is Kirill Grouchnikov's Interview with Laf-Widget Project's Michael Kneebone: 'Today I am thrilled to have Michael Kneebone as a guest spot blogger on "Pushing Pixels". Michael has extended the widgetising support in the Laf-Widget project and has graciously agreed to write about its usage and how it works on the inside...'


The new java.net Poll refers to Project Vector, which Sun's Jonathan Schwartz blogged about this past Monday. Our poll question asks: "Will Project Vector become the world's largest app store?" Voting is open through next Thursday, May 28.


Our Feature Article is Protect Your Legacy Code Investment with JNA, by Stephen B. Morris. In this article, Stephen introduces Java Native Access (JNA) and demonstrates how it can be used to facilitate interaction between Java programs an native libraries, for example Windows DLLs.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


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Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

Our just-closed poll showed that interest in this year's JavaOne Conference is high, despite the economic situation...

Scanning java.net blogsand various sites on the wider net, there is an increasing frequency of posts announcing people's JavaOne plans. As Danny Coward puts it in his Countdown to JavaOne 2009 post in Java Today:

you can gauge people's stress levels quite easily: Are they counting off the days until JavaOne begins, or the number of days until it ends?

The latter group, I guess, isn't ready for the conference yet, and perhaps never will be.

Some people, though, are quite organized. For example, Ed Burns just posted Ed's JavaOne schedule 2009. Not only does Ed provide us with the schedule of events he'll be presenting and attending, but he does it with style: using the Google Calendar, which he has also synced to Apple iCal.

For me, the number of days until I fly out to the West Coast does seem to be dwindling a bit too quickly. There are more things I wanted to get done before the conference than may fit into the next week. I do have the "advantage" of a nice long plane flight, though. I'll be able to do a few things during that, until my laptop battery runs out...

Mostly, though, I'm looking forward to meeting a lot of people I've been communicating with primarily via email in the past 7 weeks while I've been the java.net editor. And meeting more people whose blog posts and other communications I've been following and highlighting on the java.net front page and in my daily blog.

So, while JavaOne seems to be approaching a bit too fast for me, in the end I think I'm going to feel like the conference itself flew by much too fast. I'm very much looking forward to it!


In Java Today, Peligri reports on More JSF 2.0, and Now in Final Vote: "JSR 314, JSF 2.0, is Now in Final Vote. To celebrate that, here is a pass through JSF 2.0 news..."

Tiago Fernandez has taken on an interesting experiment involvingJava Integration with Groovy, JRuby and Scala : "In my last post I've implemented a Groovy application relying on a Java library which is basically an interface for the Twitter API. I'm still new to Groovy, but the tests I've been doing with it made me realize how much time I waste while dealing with boilerplate Java code...

And Danny Coward has posted his Countdown to JavaOne 2009: "Inside the walls of the Planetarium you can gauge people's stress levels quite easily: Are they counting off the days until JavaOnebegins, or the number of days until it ends ? Of course all the sessions are online now, and you should be signing up because some of them are already full. And of course, students get a free pass. And of course who will the special guests will be, in this, the year of the app store ? ..."


In today's Weblogs, Masood Mortazavi writes about a Java Twitter Client with Derby!: "Mike Haller has put together a Twitter desktop client using Derby for local data. Haller should probably also try this on the CDC environment. This would be a coll application for the CDC devices! Apache / Derby is the cauldron..."

Arun Gupta published TOTD #81: Getting Started with Servlet 3.0 and EJB 3.1 in Java EE 6 using NetBeans 6.7: "EJB 3.1 (JSR 318) and Servlet 3.0 (JSR 315) are the two new JSRs in Java EE 6 (JSR 316). The EJB 3.1 specification provides multiple new features such as WAR packaging, Optional Local Business Interfaces, EJB.lite, Portable Global JNDI Names, Singleton Session Beans (Container-managed and Bean-managed..."

And Ed Burns posts Ed's JavaOne schedule 2009: "Some events for my JavaOne 2009 plan: This year I'm trying something new: using google's calendar, synced via Apple iCal, to publish my planned sessions for JavaOne 2009. Here's what I have so far."


In the Forums,ailitche responds to a question Re: JPA sequences making up weird numbers when migrating to GlassFish 2.1: "In older version of TopLink Essentials both SEQUENCE and IDENTITY used to define IDENTITY on PostgreSQLPlatform. It looks like your table defined using Identity (SERIAL). It uses sequence named tableName_IdName_seq to populate pk field. Now TopLinkEssentials supports both SEQUENCE and IDENTITY, so GenerationType.SEQUENCE results in using default preallocation size (50). TopLinkEssential thinks that it acquires values in chunks of 50; so the first value to use would be (newlyAcquiredValue - 49).To fix instead of..."

darkman2040 continues to work with a situation where Kerberos w/ Netbeans 6.5.1 fails: "Hi again, In my previous thread I tried to implement a Kerberos service in 6.7 which failed. I have since redone the work on Netbeans 6.5.1. After much work with setting up the Kerberos environment on my Windows 2003 server I have arrived at the error in the stack trace. My environment is as follows: Netbeans 6.5.1 Glassfish 2.1 (per Netbeans bundle) Windows 2003 server. I've set up the accounts and it looks like the service is authenticating, but the secure connection is failing. Any ideas?..."

And paulbrickell asks Can a web service deployed in Grizzly access Felix: "I don't know if this is a silly question, but I am having some fundamental issues understanding the Glassfish v3 architecture and could use a pointer. I have created a bundle and added an entry in the glassfish/felix.conf e.g.file:///home/me/myworkspace/my-bundle/target/my-bundle-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar. I see this bundle starting and all is well. It opens a socket to which I can connect and exchange data, which is nice. The reason I created a bundle and not a H2K module is that I want it to be activated at server start-up time. I could not see a way of doing this with H2K. Maybe I missed something. Now I want to reference this service from a web service that I have deployed in Grizzly..."


This week's Spotlightis Kirill Grouchnikov's Interview with Laf-Widget Project's Michael Kneebone: 'Today I am thrilled to have Michael Kneebone as a guest spot blogger on "Pushing Pixels". Michael has extended the widgetising support in the Laf-Widget project and has graciously agreed to write about its usage and how it works on the inside...'


The new java.net Poll asks: "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Today is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Article is Protect Your Legacy Code Investment with JNA, by Stephen B. Morris. In this article, Stephen introduces Java Native Access (JNA) and demonstrates how it can be used to facilitate interaction between Java programs an native libraries, for example Windows DLLs.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Scanning java.net blogs and various sites on the wider net, there is an increasing frequency of posts announcing people's JavaOne plans...  

Java ToolsCommunity Leader Fabiane Bizinella Nardon will be presenting at least two mini-talks at Java.net's Community Corner 2009. The sessions and/or podcasts will take place at the Java.net booth in the JavaOne Pavilion.

On Tuesday, June 2, at 6:00 PM, Fabiane will participate in a roundtable discussion with fellow Brazilian Bruno Souza, founder of SouJava, one of the largest Java User Groups in the world. Then, on Wednesday, June 3, at 12:30 PM, Fabiane, Toni Epple, and Sven Reimers will be talking about the Java Tools Community, and specifically the SQE project (SQE = Software Quality Environment).

fabianenardon.jpg
Fabiane Bizinella Nardon

Visit Fabiane's home page and her java.net profile page to find the details of her quite accomplished career. To summarize, she's currently CTO at ZILICS, a Brazilian Healthcare Information Systems provider, where she is responsible for all technical aspects of large distributed projects deployed in Brazil, Angola, and other countries. She was the architect of the Sao Paulo City Health Care System. Before joining ZILICS, she was just as active, working for UNESCO on the National Healthcare Information System Project of the Brazilian Minstry of Health; and she chaired the Latin American Chapter of the OMG Healthcare Domain Task Force. As you can see from Fabiane's Curriculum Vitae, the core technology behind most of this work was (and is) JavaEE.

In addition, Fabiane is a Java Champion. Her education includes PhD coursework at the Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo. Current research interests include:

  • Medical Informatics
  • Knowledge Sharing
  • Knowledge Representation
  • Semantic Web
  • Deductive Databases
  • Distributed Systems

Despite all of this, Fabiane somehow finds time to lead the java.net Java Tools community. Java Tools is one of our more active communities, as is shown by the latest JavaTools Community Newsletter (today's lead Java Today news item). This issue (No. 196) starts with a mention of the "java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter network" that I'm organizing, where you will be able to follow a group of java.net tweeters who will be at the conference. In addition, the newsletter includes:

  • congratulations to the ConfigureMe project, which has graduated from the incubator (by releasing Version 1.0);
  • a welcome to the brand new GravityIDE project;
  • a tooltip: "Testing your web application in multiple containers with little effort"; and
  • recent news from the development tools world on projects such as NetBeans, Jailer, and Secure FTB Bean.

I'm very much looking forward to Fabiane's visit to the java.net booth and her Community Corner appearances. If you'll be at JavaOne, visit the Java.netCommunity Corner Podcast Schedule 2009 for any late changes or additions to the schedule. If you won't be at the conference, be aware that we'll be recording all the mini-talks, so they'll be available as videos or podcasts during or after the conference.


In Java Today,JavaTools Community Newsletter - Issue 196 has been published: "A new edition of the newsletter is available, with news, new projects and tips! If you want to receive the newsletter by email, please subscribe the announcements mailing list - or read the current issue here."

Robilad provides an update on OpenJDK BSD port progress : FreeBSD, Mac OS X, OpenBSD, NetBSD: "A little while ago, I pointed out that OpenJDK 6 has made it into the FreeBSD Ports collection. Grew Lewis and Kurt Miller have since worked with Brian Gardner to improve the port and the patchset, and have updated it to OpenJDK 6 build 16. Landon Fuller took the opportunity to take the FreeBSD changes and adapt them for Mac OS X 10.5..."

And JavaLobby's Nitin Bharti interviews Pete Muir on Seam 3, Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE (JSR 299): "DZone recently caught up with Pete Muir to get an update on JSR 299, Seam 3 and the forthcoming JSF 2.0 specification. In this interview, Pete examines several implementations of JSR 299, recently renamed from WebBeans to Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java EE. He also provides a preview of some of the improvements we can expect to see in Seam 3.0 and JSF 2.0..."


In the Weblogs, Bruno Ghisi presents MessagePropertyGenerator: a java util class for translating message bundles: "Simple Java util class that helps message files translation using Google Translate API. If you want to translate your message files for a couple of different languages, but you do not have money, do not have time, do not have language specialists friends or do not have anything else to help you, we have a solution... actually we got a "use at your own risk" solution! Here are the steps... "

Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein notices that Sun's new App Store is JavaFX based: "Project Vector, to be unleashed at JavaOne 2009, may or may not be a killer app - but one thing is sure, it's probably big enough to mean that JavaFX will survive to the Oracle deal. Check it at Jonathan's Blog. Now, a unified app store for all Java devices, from feature phones up to desktops, if well executed is something with great potential..."

And Kohsuke Kawaguchi has released a Hudson EC2 plugin: "I released Hudson EC2 plugin, which enables you to use EC2 as Hudson slaves on-demand, without human intervention. Continuous Integration often requires a heterogeneous environments; for example, the GlassFish build requires Linux, Solaris, and Windows, and the JDK build requires something like 10 different environments, each carefully created so that we can test what we need to test. Unfortunately..."


In the Forums,rado_penev is in Need of invoker EnterpriseBean as parameter in RoleMapper impl class: "Hi all. I am working on an enterprise project with a fine-grained access control. Using default GlassFish's security implementation does not meet the requirements of the project. I made a custom JDBC authentication module. It is working with GlassFish v3, that's fine. But I also need a dynamic role-group mappings. This is already achieveable by providing a custom RoleMapper implementation using the SimplePolicyProvider, also known as the inmemory JACC provider. This is also working. But I need more flexibility..."

markshure asks about Sending an XML signature in a web service: "Hi, I'm trying to create a Metro web service that will accept data that has an XML signature. The XML signature is part of a parameter; it's *not* the WS-Sec signature. I can't find a way to do this because JAXB changes the XML signature (e.g. rename namespace prefixes, remove whitespace), which then invalidates the XML signature at the receiving end. How can I tell JAXB not to touch a certain piece of XML data? ..."

And bhayward is having a problem where a Web Service Client works as stand-alone Java Application/Fails in glassfish: "My Configuration: NetBeans 6.5.1; JDK 1.6.0_13; GlassFish 2.1 (The version shipped with NetBeans 6.5.1). I have a WSDL that has types in it's embedded schema and it imports an xsd for additional types. wsimport completes successfully. Of course, the wsdl and xsd's use different namespaces. There are types in the WSDL and XSD that have the same name and elements, so the @XmlType annotation ends up identical. When using this web service through a stand-alone java program, it works fine. When deploying it to GlassFish, it fails... "


This week's Spotlightis Kirill Grouchnikov's Interview with Laf-Widget Project's Michael Kneebone: 'Today I am thrilled to have Michael Kneebone as a guest spot blogger on "Pushing Pixels". Michael has extended the widgetising support in the Laf-Widget project and has graciously agreed to write about its usage and how it works on the inside...'


The new java.net Poll asks: "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Voting is open through Thursday.


In our Feature Article,

 
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The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Java Tools Community Leader Fabiane Bizinella Nardon will be presenting at least two mini-talks at Java.net's Community Corner 2009...  

The Java Community Process recently celebrated its tenth anniversary as the entity responsible for organizing the development of Java and its core APIs. In today's lead Java Today story, "The Java Community Process - A Year in Review", James Sugrue highlights key aspects from a report on the past year's progress written by JCP member Patrick Curran. In his review, Sugrue notes:

One of the most interesting things for me is that in all of the 70 JSRs that are active right now, the majority of them are focussed on JavaME, which has 27. JavaSE has 20, which JavaEE has 15.

and:

Out of the 70 active JSRs, Sun (unsurprisingly) holds the Spec Lead role for most, at 27. They are followed by Nokia (11), Oracle (8), Motorola (5) and IBM (4). With Oracle buying out Sun, I guess that puts Oracle out front with 35. 50% spec leadership would give them a significant say in the future of Java.

Patrick Curran's report includes lists of new and completed JSRs. There were six new JSRs in the past year, five of them initiated by corporations (AT&T, Sun, Ericsson AB, IBM, SK Telecom) and one by IAIK Graz University of Technology. The tilt toward the micro platform is evident among these JSRs, including JSR 320 (Services Framework), JSR 325 (IMS Communication Enablers), and JSR 327 (Dynamic Contents Delivery Service API for Java ME).

Among the 10 JSRs that were completed in calendar year 2008, development in the mobile/micro area is also predominate, with almost everything either directly focused on or having some potential for application on hand-held platforms:

  • JSR 272: Mobile Broadcast Service API for Handheld Terminals (Nokia/Motorola);
  • JSR 293: Location API 2.0 (Nokia);
  • JSR 298: Telematics API for Java ME (SK Telecom);
  • JSR 311: JAX-RS: The Java API for RESTful Web Services (Sun);
  • JSR 289: SIP Servlet v1.1 (Oracle);
  • JSR 240: JAIN SLEE v1.1 (OpenCloud);
  • JSR 281: IMS Services API (Ericsson AB);
  • JSR 258: Mobile User Interface Customization API (Nokia);
  • JSR 286: Portlet Specification 2.0 (IBM);
  • JSR 254: OSS Discovery API (Nakina Systems).

To me, that the primary direction of new Java development is in the micro realm makes sense: that is where the world has changed and is changing most rapidly with respect to "computer" hardware. Modern mobile phones are powerful computers, moreso even than they are mere "telephones." On my Blackberry, there is so much more that I can do than simply make and receive phone calls. And much of the extras were things that were possible only on desktop or laptop computers ten years ago (email, browsing the web). In addition, there are capabilities that are clearly computer applications that will never have a place on a desktop computer (GPS to help me find the place I want to go to, for example).

The Java Community Process has certainly been criticized over the issue of openness (see Jon Brodkin's "Opening up the Java Community Process" for an analysis of this issue). But, the JCP does serve to categorize Java's progress and direction in a way that makes it clear where current effort is being focused. Right now that focus appears to be on the micro end of the scale, judging purely by the number of JSRs that have been recently completed and the new JSRs.


In Java Today, James Sugrue reviews the past year's progress in The Java Community Process - A Year in Review: "Last year the Java Community Process turned 10 years old. Patrick Curran has published his review of the last year of activity in JSR Watch: Here's To Progress. In the article he discussed a number of issues from the JCP membership and leadership to JSR activity. One of the most interesting things for me is that in all of the 70 JSRs that are active right now, the majority of them..."

Derek White updates the status of Java for the FIRST Robotics Competition!: "On April 16th we announced that Java would be available for the FIRST Robotics Competition. This is joint work between Sun and WPI to port Squawk (an open-source Java virtual machine) to the compactRIO robot control system, as well as the WPILib robotics library from C++ to Java..."

And Peligri announces an extended webinar schedule for this week: 3 Online Webinars - JSR299, Software Appliances, VirtualBox: "We have 3 webinars this week - one in our normal time slot, the other two in new slots to squeeze the topics before JavaOne. The topics are very interesting, I hope you can join us. The first webinar is on Tuesday and is a reschedule: Pete Muir (Red Hat), the implementation lead for Seam and WebBeans will present on JSR 299, born as WebBeans but now tentatively named Context and Dependency Injection for Java..."


In today's Weblogs, Jim Driscoll talks about Using an IDE to write a JSF 2.0 App: "So, you're on the cutting edge, writing JSF 2.0 applications, but that doesn't mean you have to write your apps using vi (or emacs, or edlin). It's actually pretty easy to use an IDE to write your JSF 2 application. The price, unfortunately, is on-the-fly error checking..."

Ed Burns offers Slides and Feedback on JSF2 webinar: "Link to the slides. Request for feedback. There were between 60 and 69 participants in the webinar. We had some technical difficulties with the audio. Sorry about that. Many thanks to Imre and others who tried to help by setting up secondary skype call..."

And Marina Sum announces Free Sun Webinar on Directory Services on Wednesday, May 20: "Sun product line manager Nick Wooler will host a free Webinar next Wednesday, May 20 on cost savings and performance enhancements delivered by directory services. See Nick's posting for more specifics...


In the Forums,sbeard found the solution to the problem Re: Durable subscription for topic connection factory: "We have finally found a solution to this! It's so trivial, we should all be flipping burgers. haha. The trick to getting durable subscribers working on Open MQ is setting up two connection factories, one for the durable subscribers and the other for the nondurable and publishers. The AHA moment came when I broke the pieces into two apps and discovered that it was the message producer that was failing, not the subscriber. For the durable subscriber connection factory, you have to add the ClientId property on the resource. Nothing else is required in the app beyond flipping the subscriptionDurable switch. So basically, we needed to set up separate topic connection factories..."

mvlach wonders about Bean binding: "Hi, can somebody help me with bean bindiing? I have an autobinding that bind the entity Application to the TextField. But when I change the instance of application, the binding don't work. I know, that it is another instance and the binding don't know the instance is change. But I don't know how do my job correctly. It is possible to say to the binding that I would like to change the source object ? Thanks Mila"

And podlesh responds to a post Re: Marshaling of a JAXB Object (with another JAXB object inherited): "I am not sure what problem you have, but there is one serious pitfall: the JAXB context must contain ALL classes that are used in the serialized/deserialized XML. If some class is missing and its superclass is available, JAXB silently uses the superclass - throwing away any properties defined in subclass. This leads to serious and hard-to-find bugs. To avoid this problem, always construct JAXBContext with all possibly used classes. Don't use newInstance with String parameter (especially if you have more then one package) and don't use just the newInstance(Class) with root class (Axis2 generated stubs do that, but it's wrong). In our project, we use JAXBContext.newInstance(Class... ) ..."


This week's Spotlightis Kirill Grouchnikov's Interview with Laf-Widget Project's Michael Kneebone: 'Today I am thrilled to have Michael Kneebone as a guest spot blogger on "Pushing Pixels". Michael has extended the widgetising support in the Laf-Widget project and has graciously agreed to write about its usage and how it works on the inside...'


The new java.net Poll asks: "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Voting is open through this Thursday.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



The Java Community Process recently celebrated its tenth anniversary as the entity responsible for organizing the development of Java and its core APIs...  

This week's java.net Spotlight highlights Michael Kneebone's appearance as guest blogger on Kirill Grouchnikov's Pushing Pixels site. Michael works on the Laf-Widget project (Laf = "Look And Feel"). He has recently extended the project's widgetising support, and writes about its usage and how it works on the inside.

The goal of the Laf-widget project is to "provide support for a base set of additional behaviour and widgets in look-and-feels." The project is currently at release candidate version 4.2. The software is licensed under the BSD License. Here's how Michael Kneebone describes the project:

The LAF Widget (Look and Feel) project enables Swing components to be augmented with additional features or behaviour to make them more useful. Each new behaviour is contained in a "widget" which adds some specific behaviour to one (or several) types of Swing component. For instance one type of widget augments JInternalFrames by adding a thumbnail preview of the content when the mouse is hovered over a minimised frame, while another widget adds a padlock icon to uneditable text fields. Some widgets are more involved like the password strength checker widget which provides visual feedback to the user on password fields indicating the quality of the chosen password.

The key motivation behind LAFWidget is that the application writer should not have to program support for any of this behaviour him/herself.

The currently available widgets include:

  • Auto-completion (model-based / free-text) on editable combo boxes.
  • Hover preview of minimized internal frames on desktop icons.
  • Menu search panel on menu bars.
  • Hover preview of tab in tabbed panes.
  • Overview dialog on tabbed panes with optional periodic refresh.
  • Tab paging on tabbed panes.
  • Password strength checker on password fields.
  • Lock border on non-editable text components and model-based editable combo boxes.
  • Select all text in text component on focus gain.
  • Context menu on text components with edit actions (copy / paste / cut / delete / select all).
  • Enhanced drag-and-drop support for trees.
  • Scroll pane selector.
  • Selecting / deselecting in text components on Escape key press.

In his guest post, Michael talks about the disadvantages of using sub-classes to provide alternate component behavior, a strategy that less experienced Java developers are apt to choose:

Sub-classing is a very heavy handed approach for modifying GUI components due its inflexibility. Consider adding a common context menu to text components (e.g. cut, copy, paste, etc.); you could create MyJTextField, MyJTextArea, etc. subclasses adding the required behaviour. You would then be required to revisit the entire application substituting the original Swing components for these modified versions - not an attractive prospect.

Implementing the Laf-widget components is much more straightforward:

GUI development is conducted in the same way as before and all widgets automatically work with the GUI, with no added effort from the developer.

This is possible because Swing provides for pluggable Look-And-Feel, which separates the appearance and behavior of components from their actual use.

Michael describes how simple it is to include the Laf-widget project tools within your own application:

  1. Download version 4.2 or above of the LAFWidget from https://laf-widget.dev.java.net/
  2. Include the laf-widget.jar on your classpath.
  3. In the main method of your application addorg.jvnet.lafwidget.LAFAdapter.startWidget(); before the GUI is created.

Once you've done that, all Swing components will appear with the Laf-widget components enabled.

To see how all this works, see the "How The Process Works" section in Michael's guest post.


In Java Today, Bruce Hopkins recently investigated Creating Interactive TV Applications With the Tru2way Platform and OCAP: 'If you're reading about the Tru2way platform for the first time, you might be asking yourself the question, "Is it really possible to have a Java-enabled TV?" Or, better yet, "Is it possible to put a JVM machine inside my cable set-top box?" The answer to both questions is yes, and you don't have to wait 5 or 10 years for this technology to come to fruition because it's already available today...'

Charles Lamb announces Berkeley DB Java Edition 3.3.82 Available: "Berkeley DB Java Edition 3.3.82 is a patch release consisting of fixes for a number of significant issues. We strongly recommend that users of the 3.3.x version upgrade to this release. There are several issues that are critical for applications using deferred write (aka temporary databases), XA, the shared environment cache, a single transaction in multiple threads, or large sets of duplicates. These critical fixes are..."

And Ajay Bhargov discusses Java Persistance with Spring, Hibernate and Maven: "In this article, I will be showing how to persist an Entity class in Java using Spring, Hibernate and Maven. Basic knowledge of Maven, Spring and Hibernate is required to go through this article. Setting up the pom.xml file..."


In today's Weblogs, Kohsuke Kawaguchi announces his new Hudson Selenium Grid Plugin: "I've released the Hudson Selenium Grid plugin, which instantly lets you deploy Selenium Grid on top of your existing Hudson cluster. By using this plugin, you can start using Selenium Grid without installing it on individual machines in the cluster manually..."

John Ferguson Smart looks forward to Making Agile Real: the Agile2009 conference: "The official Agile2009 is out, and it looks fantastic! The Agile2009 conference, in Chicago, August 24 to 28, is chock-a-block with interesting and useful sessions with a swathe of Agile rock stars. I was involved with organizing the Tools..."

And Arun Gupta summarizes the GlassFish Portfolio at JavaOne 2009 - 20 Technical Sessions, 16 Birds-of-Feather, 7 Hands-on-Labs, and much more: "Here is the list of Technical Sessions, Birds-of-Feather sessions, and Hands-on Labs delivered by the GlassFish Portfolio team at JavaOne 2009. Technical Sessions TS-3790 Java Servlet 3.0: Using Async Features in the Real World Jan Luehe, Rajiv Mordani, Gregg Wilkins TS-4012 Pragmatic Identity 2.0: Simple,..."


In the Forums, Shai Almog continues a conversation Re: menu is slower than it used to be: "Hi, that still doesn't quite help us pinpoint the problem and my same response applies regarding finding a specific revision number where a regression has/hasn't occurred. Having said that to improve your performance and possibly detect the curlpit try the following: 1. Remove the background image of the menu. 2. Disable animations in the form and background threads. 3. Make the menu opaque and make sure it doesn't feature a rounded border. 4. Use system fonts. Enable each of these iteratively to determine the main contributor for your performance issue..."

uckelman has a question about setting the maximum heap size automatically: "I'm working on a program which, as one of its functions, displays some (potentially very large) images contained in a ZIP archive. The amount of heap space used by other objects is almost always insignificant in comparison with the amount of heap space used by these images, and the actual heap requirements can vary wildly depending on the particular images the user is loading. The architecture of the program is such that one part of it (the "manager") launches child JVM instances for doing the work. This makes it possible for us to set the maximum heap size independently for each child. Presently, the max heap size is set in a preferences dialog..."

And darkman2040 has a problem with the Kerberos example Netbeans 6.7 missing security thread: "Hi everyone, I've been trying to implement the Kerberos Example and I seem to be stuck. I've configured the web service and client using Netbeans 6.7(beta). If I follow all the steps and a few odd things occur: 1. The keystore is still specifed in my policy tag. If I remove the Keystore tag then the web service deploys and I can hit it on my Tomcat server (6.0 bundled with Netbeans) when I run test web service. 2. The generated client sends a message request..."


As stated above, this week's Spotlightis Kirill Grouchnikov's Interview with Laf-Widget Project's Michael Kneebone: 'Today I am thrilled to have Michael Kneebone as a guest spot blogger on "Pushing Pixels". Michael has extended the widgetising support in the Laf-Widget project and has graciously agreed to write about its usage and how it works on the inside...'


The new java.net Poll asks: "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Voting is open through this Thursday.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



This week's java.net Spotlight highlights Michael Kneebone's appearance as guest blogger on Kirill Grouchnikov's Pushing Pixels site...  

A quick glance at the results of last week's java.net poll might make you think the java.net community has a clear opinion about the future of JavaFX. After all, more than half of all votes were cast for the response "It [JavaFX] will never be widely used." And it has been rare in recent polls for a single response to garner 50% or more of the voting.

Look a bit more closely, though, and you can argue that the community actually is more evenly divided on JavaFX's future. Here's the specific question that was asked, along with the final vote tally:

How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?

  • 4.3% (27 votes) - It's growth will be explosive
  • 12.7% (79 votes) - Eventually it will be a dominant technology
  • 22.4% (139 votes) - It will endure as a secondary option
  • 52.5% (325 votes) - It will never be widely used
  • 3.8% (24 votes) - What's JavaFX?
  • 4.0% (25 votes) - I don't know; other

The first thing to note is that more than 600 votes were cast. That means that this poll stimulated more community participation than any of the other recent polls. Does this matter? I think so. I think it suggests that, whatever may people think about the future of JavaFX, JavaFX is something that has captured their interest. People are following JavaFX.

Here's why I think the poll results indicate a divided view rather than a clear verdict, despite the 52.5% of votes cast for "It will never be widely used." If you total the votes for the first three response options, you see that almost 30% of the votes cast reflect the view that JavaFX is going to be a viable technology for quite a long time into the future, either within a niche, or as an ultimately dominating technology that displaces other, currently dominant technologies.

More than 1/6th of the responses believe that ultimately JavaFX will become the dominant rich client technology. That's a remarkably high number for a new technology that's entering an already crowded field that includes a fairly entrenched established technology, and new competitors backed by corporate giants.

Now perhaps you can say "but yes, this is a poll of Java insiders, so it's not an objective view." Yes, you can say that; also, this is not a scientifically conducted survey. Still, most of the voters have established expertise in technology and software development, and many have seen technologies long presumed to be unstoppably dominant begin to lose their footing. It takes time, certainly, but if you've been around for some decades you've seen things that never would have seemed possible happen -- such as free software effectively competing with corporate products on many different fronts.

Anyway, this was indeed an interesting poll, with interesting results. The comments voters posted were interesting as well, with people saying what they think is wrong with JavaFX as it currently stands, and others offering ideas as to what enhancements would turn JavaFX into "a killer."

New Poll: How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009

Voting is now open on our new poll, which asks "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Voting is open through the next week.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


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In Java Today, Charles Humble reviews the history and current state of OpenJDK governance in OpenJDK Governance Board's Life is Extended Despite Lack of Delivery: "Sun Microsystems' probable acquisition by Oracle, the fact that there is still not a JSR for Java 7, and the lack of a Constitution for the OpenJDK project, is becoming a matter of concern amongst some in the Java community. However, on the 8th May 2009, Mark Reinhold, Chief Engineer for Java SE at Sun, announced that Sun has extended the life of the Interim OpenJDK Governance Board for a further twelve months..."

InfoQueue published a new article by Ryan Knight, Spring BlazeDS Integration: What it Is and What Does it Change?: "Adobe and Spring made a major announcement the end of last year that they where going to collaborate on a joint project called Spring BlazeDS Integration. The goal was to allow the Spring development model to be used for creating Rich Internet Applications (RIA's) with Adobe Flex, BlazeDS, Spring and Java. This would allow Spring managed services to be exposed through BlazeDS..."

And Peligri talks about history and a new era for computing inNo Longer Punch Cards... Nor Laptops! - Hudson Services On The Cloud: "Many years ago, one would write a program by punching a Card Deck on your Puncher, submitting it (with a rubber band) and then getting back a printout... Then we went through Teletypes, CRTs, Workstations and today's Laptops. So, how does the future look like? ..."


In our featured Weblogs, Felipe Gaucho shows how to implement Google AdSense in your Hudson installation: "This is probably my shortest blog ever, just to register a mini trick with Hudson. The good news are: you can add Google AdSense to your Hudson frontpage - or any other HTML snippet you want..."

Jim Driscoll demonstrates Redirecting from a JSF 2.0 Ajax Request: "Recently, I had a user ask how to do a redirect from an JSF 2.0 Ajax request. Here's one way, that I've lifted from one of our tests. First, the bean that does the work..."

And Ed Burns announces JSF2 Final Approval Ballot in Progress: "As you can see on the JSR page for JSR-314, the Final Approval Ballot phase for JSF 2.0 is underway and runs til 26 May."


The new java.net Poll asks: "How closely will you follow JavaOne 2009?" Voting will run through next Thursday, May 21.


This week's Spotlightis Ed Ort's article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community: "Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some very interesting applications with it. This is a vibrant, creative, and extremely productive community..."


In the Forums,freaksta has a problem involving Marshaling of a JAXB Object (with another JAXB object inherited): "Hello everybody! I have used JAXB in plenty of works now, but now i have a problem, and i don

Several members of the JavaFXteam will be appearing in an open question and answer session in ajava.net Community Corner event on Wednesday, June 3, at 2:00, in the java.net booth at JavaOne. Ed Ort, of the Sun Developer Network, will be moderating. For Ed to be moderating the Q&A is particularly fitting, since Ed has done a lot of writing about JavaFX recently, including this week's java.net Spotlight feature, JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community.

As I described in my earlier post, Ed's JavaFX App-O-Rama article is multifaceted in a way that lets us see the type of applications early JavaFX developers have come up with: he presents visual images of the applications, a button to launch the applications, key code snippets, and quotes from the developers. If you haven't yet had time to take a look at JavaFX, the JavaFX App-O-Rama is a very good starting point.

Today's lead Java Todaynews item is also about JavaFX: Danny Coward posted a summary of the state of JavaFX tooling, in which he describes the growing support for JavaFX development by the developers of Java toolkits and IDEs. Among the toolkits he highlights are:

  • the JavaFX Production Suite, which enables integration of graphics from professional graphics creation tools into JavaFX applications; and
  • the new JavaFX designer tool that is being worked on by Sun developers (including Tor Norbye)

I don't know if a final decision has been made yet on exactly which members of the JavaFX team will be participating in the Community Corner Q&A. But, I expect it to be an interesting session. If JavaFX interests you and you'd like a chance to pose some questions to the team, come to the java.net booth in the JavaOne Pavillion at 2:00 on Wednesday, June 2. Admission is free. See you there!

Oh -- and if you won't be at JavaOne, you'll still be able to hear the JavaFX team Q&A session: it will be available online as a podcast not too long after the actual event takes place. I'll point that out to you when it comes online.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

In Java Today, Danny Coward provides a summary of the state of JavaFX tooling: "All the JavaFX tools are based on the basic command-line tools contained in the JavaFX SDK. Tools to invoke theruntime, compiler, and package, and document JavaFX applications. And of course, since JavaFX is itself built in and on Java, the tried and tested Java tools are often useful, especially in profiling and debugging JavaFX applications..."

Kirill Grouchnikov announces Release candidate for Flamingo 4.1: "I am pleased today to announce the availability of release candidate for version 4.1 of Flamingo component suite(code-named Guenivere). It is a stabilization release that adds a few minor features and fixes all known bugs. Here is the list of minor features added in release 4.1: Multi-row controls in ribbon bands..."

And Viral Patel gathered together 20 very useful Java code snippets for Java Developers: "Following are few very useful Java code snippets for Java developers. Few of them are written by me and few are taken from other code reference. Feel free to comment about the code and also add your code snippet..."


In today's Weblogs, Arun Gupta has posted GlassFish and Servlet 3.0 Slides from San Francisco JUG: "As mentioned earlier, Jan and I talked about GlassFish and Servlet 3.0 at the San Francisco JUG yesterday night. Approximately 40 attendees and a great Q&A session at the end made it a truly enjoying experience. The GlassFish slides are available here and Servlet 3.0 slides are available..."

Tim Boudreau tells us about A library for diffing java.util.Lists: "I recently set up a new project on Kenai.com - this is something that has been available in NetBeans for years, and is probably useful to a wider audience. It is a library for taking two java.util.Lists and generating a diff between them..."

And Kohsuke Kawaguchi announces Hudson PXE plugin 1.0 is released: "A new Hudson plugin automates installation of OS on PCs. And as with everything else in Hudson, it's very easy to use..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?" Today (Thursday) is the last full day of voting in this poll, so get your vote in if you haven't already done so.


This week's Spotlightis Ed Ort's article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community: "Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some very interesting applications with it. This is a vibrant, creative, and extremely productive community..."


In the Forums,michaelgriffith has a JPA/View Problem: "Hi all, I've searched the forum and it looks as if JPA does support views, which is what I am trying to do -- but having a problem. In my case, the view is owned by another schema. When I connect to the Oracle 10 schema using a tool like Toad, I can't see the view even though I can query it. I tried the query select * from user_views which produced no result. When I try to configure JPA (backed by Hibernate) I get the error:Invocation of init method failed; nested exception is javax.persistence.PersistenceException: [PersistenceUnit: XXXX] Unable to build EntityManagerFactory ... [junit] Caused by: org.hibernate.HibernateException: Missing table: VIEW_TABLEI complained about this to my DBA, but the answer I get is: 'The system view user_views only shows views that the user owns...' "

dimok is seeing some Problems with GlassFish: "Dear, friends, please help me. I have installed glassfish server v2 and have added it to netbeans 6.5; when I tried to start it in the first time it worked correctly, but when I exited netbeans, then started it again and tried to start glassfish it didn't start. And the error occured: Error refreshing ConfigContext:C:\Distributives\glassfish\domains\domain1\config\domain.xml cause: Failed to create the XML-DOM Document. Check your XML to make sure it is correct. Invalid byte 2 of 2-byte UTF-8 sequence. What should I do? ..."

And question has questions regarding JXMapViewer - JButton as Waypoint: "Hi, I developed a application which places the custom waypoints onto the JXMapViewer. I used WaypointPainter class to customize the waypoint. I have not used Gaphics object to draw the waypoint instead i used setRenderer(..) I used JButton as a waypoints through which i added MouseListener to the waypoints to identify which waypoint was clicked. Problem: 1) When i move the map towards left/right/top/bottom some of the waypoints are strucking up in the corners. They are not losing the GeoPositions. Can you please give me the solution for this. 2) Is there any other way rather than using JButton as Waypoints and adding listeners to the JButton..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Several members of the JavaFX team will be appearing in an open question and answer session in a java.net Community Corner event on Wednesday, June 3, at 2:00...  

Kirk Pepperdine, noted Java performance tuning expert and Java Champion, will be speaking in a Java.net Community Corner event, in the java.net booth at JavaOne, on Tuesday, June 2, at 3:00 PM. Kirk will be conversing with Janice J. Heiss of the Sun Developer Network on the topic of (you guessed it) Java performance tuning.

Performance tuning isn't something that every developer thinks they need to know about, and some even consider it a sort of arcane topic area, with vague connections to magic and the waving of wizard's wands. However, in his recent post Performance tuning is about applying localized optimizations(featured in today's Java Today), Kirk tries to dispel this manner of thinking, noting that:

performance tuning is a local optimization and before you apply any advice given by any manual, guide [or] self proclaimed expert, you need to poke your head up, take a look about to see if it will work for you in your current situation.

So, is he saying he can't tell you much about performance tuning? Well, no. What's he's saying is that, with performance tuning, each situation is unique. He can't stand in front of you and tell you how to tune your application for performance; he can only describe to you the types of strategies that may work in certain types of situation.

In other words: there is no magic wand when it comes to performance tuning. Your application is a unique creature, it has its own bottlenecks that are there due to layers of code having been applied probably by different people at different points in time in response to different enhancement and upgrade requirements. There is no way anyone can listen to you ask "How can I make my application run faster?" and say "Do this, this, and this" -- and Voila! your application suddenly runs 10 times faster.

I like this quote a lot:

At an abstract level, a computer system is nothing more than a series of queues. Response times in this system are guided by Little's Law. The applicable part of Little's Law states that throughput is inversely proportional to service time. Placing more load on a system will have the effect of increasing service time which will in turn increase latency. Putting less load on a system should have the opposite effect. But in this case overall response time is a sum of the response times of all the little subsystems. If you decrease the latency in one subsystem you will increase the pressure on downstream subsystems (queues). The net effect on response time will be determined by the difference between the decrease due to the performance improvement and the increase due to the increase in downstream pressure. If the downstream component's performance is close to the tipping point, it could a performance degradation that swamps out the positive benefits gained from tuning part of a system.

[For your reference, here's a description of Little's Law.]

If you've ever done performance tuning on a relatively complex system, you know what Kirk is saying here. If you've worked on a complex system in a situation where different developers were responsible for different components that run sequentially (one receives the output from another and passes its result to a third component), then you've probably experienced "well, I knowmy component is fast, because it screams in unit testing. Surely the bottleneck is elsewhere..." It's not always that simple. Even a component that is very fast when it is run using a small amount of data (which is how we usually unit test code, right?) can bog down under the stress of high volumes of rapidly arriving data.

Another interesting post, to give you an idea of what it's like to be Kirk Pepperdine on a daily basis (i.e., what kind of stuff does he typically think about as his day proceeds?) is his speculative Non-blocking almost FIFO. Here, he brings up the "problem" of applications running in a "multi-core world":

what does strict FIFO mean in a multi-core world? With more than 1 thread making forward progress, there is in effect a race to the head of the queue which is somewhat non-deterministic. In other words, in complex systems, it's crap shoot as to which thread makes it to the head of any queue prior to any other thread. More over, most people don't really care about first in first out. What they do care about is an ordering of when things get done. I often call this requirement, first in, first done. While that may have made sense in batch/single core, it makes no sense in multi-core. Again, this is a situation where many threads all making simultaneous forward progress are in a race for either the head or tail of the queue.

Multi-core / multithread does indeed change everything.

Then there are issues down at the line-by-line level. Think it's smart to be clever and do in 4 lines what could have been done in 10 straightforward but boring lines of code? Not necessarily. And what about letting yourself get a bit sloppy regarding proper code structure as you race against the onrushing release date? Also not a great idea.

In a 2006 Java Specialists' Newsletter article, Kirk said:

"I have found that violating design principles or writing overly complex code is often the stumbling block to achieving good performance."

In July 2008, Janice Heiss asked Kirk about this, and about writing "dumb" code. Here's part of his response:

While we write code to run on a machine, the primary consumers of code are humans. Dumb code tends to be more readable and hence more understandable. If we can iron out the twists, then we have a better chance of avoiding the dumb mistakes that clever code may hide from us.

Another reason to write dumb code is that most of the complexities are due to some optimization that everyone thinks is needed. In many cases, these optimizations are premature. While I'm all for performance planning, I'm dead set against premature optimizations.

Which brings us to the second question -- how does well-structured code help performance? Most performance problems can only be solved by adding or altering code in the application. I've found that if the code is well structured and loosely coupled, if the classes are cohesive, and the code uses delegation, I can avoid the whack-a-mole problem when I start to change code.

Kirk's live Community Corner 2009 talk with Janice is sure to be an engaging and thought-provoking event. I look forward to seeing you there, at the java.net booth, on Tuesday, June 2, at 3:00 PM.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

In Java Today, we're highlighting Kirk Pepperdine's recent mini-article Performance tuning is about applying localized optimizations: 'I always start my talks with the following disclaimer; "The resemblance of any opinion, recommendation or comment made during this presentation to performance tuning advice is merely coincidental". The slide never fails to both amuse yet cause people to wonder why they decided on my session. Why do I start with this disclaimer?... '

Fabrizio Giudici has looked at many example JavaFX applications, and provides advice on good programming practices in JavaFX: Using Patterns & Clean Code: "We are seeing quite a number of exciting JavaFX demos around, demonstrating the pretty features of the language and the capability of easily integrating cool graphics. But, as a software designer, I can't prevent myself from seeing that in most examples we see bloated code - no good separation of concerns and poor applications of the MVC pattern..."

And Adrian Cole announces jclouds-s3 beta released: "jclouds is an api for concurrent access to cloud services such as Amazon Web Services. Initially we support Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). In the future, we will support other amazon web services, as well other service providers..."


In today's Weblogs, Sean Sheedy, who's visiting the UK, posted Attention London/Southampton mobile developers: "Hi, I'm one of the Java ME Executive Committee (EC) members and an Individual JCP member (that is, representing you, and not a big corporation, on the EC.) I would like to hear from other Java ME developers while I'm in the UK this week for EC meetings..."

Marina Sum tells us OpenSSO Fedlet Named Best Innovation by European Identity Conference: "Well-earned honor for the lightweight service-provider implementation of SAML 2.0. As pointed out by Sun's Pat Patterson and Daniel Raskin, OpenSSO's Fedlet won the Best Innovation Award at the recently held European Identity Conference. The Fedlet, in Pat's words, is..."

And Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein announces Full JavaFX comming for Linux and Solaris: "I noticed that bug RT-3308: Media Support for Linux and Solaris was Resolved as Fixed a few days ago. The media support (which is mostly native code) is the major portability trouble in JavaFX, it's the piece that was missing for Linux and Solaris. The bug was also marked as a Release Driver for v1.5..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?" Voting is open through Thursday.


This week's Spotlightis Ed Ort's article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community: "Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some very interesting applications with it. This is a vibrant, creative, and extremely productive community..."


In the Forums,lupanbr asks WS-Security on JAX-WS - Container specific ?: "Hi everyone! I'm currently starting to study about Web services and JAX-WS in general. I've read some about the WS-Security spec and looked up for it's implementation across some technologies and frameworks. For what I've seen, each container/application server (JBoss,Glassfish,Spring...) have their own implementations of the spec (with custom configuration files and annotations for example) , even though they all have support for JAX-WS. Since I'm making some effort not to get specific to a given Application Server (since my organization may change between them) I'm concerned about using a specific implementation from these frameworks/technologies. So my questions are... "

davyp responds in a PhoneME Feature thread Re: No console output: "Hi Vincent, I have indeed implemented some of the mobile media APIs. With phoneME Feature MIDP you can play some wav files, tones, and single track midi files, but only if you open them as resources in your jar file. Unfortunately, some of the code needs to be rewritten for the phoneME Advanced dual stack, and I am having compilation problems when trying to include JSRs at build time. I assume you have been testing audio with different midlets. The different behaviors can be explained by the fact that some audio formats are not supported (like .au or .mp3) and that some midlets may intercept exceptions that are thrown... "

And jkva asks for assistance with [webtier] EL output filtering in JSP: "Hi, I'm working on a JSP application (non-JSF) and I'd like to do some output filtering on every variable that is used in the JSP pages. The reason for this is security, I want to prevent cross site scripting. We're using a home brewn MVC framework which looks a bit like Struts, so I have plenty of options regarding logic placement. The control flow is very simple, all logic is put into Java controllers, which are executed. The controllers return the model back to the page. The framework does this by calling request.setAttribute() for each model variable. So far, so good. The problem is, not every model variable is a simple string. For example, we pass complete domain objects (Client, Transaction, Account) back to the JSP and the JSP then walks over the object graphs..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Kirk Pepperdine, noted Java performance tuning expert and Java Champion, will be speaking in a Java.net Community Corner event, in the java.net booth at JavaOne...  

There is a definite increase in the number of people expressing, as Terrence Barr has, that JavaOne 2009 is "approaching too fast." I'm certainly feeling that way, finding myself starting to look atBART information on getting from San Francisco International Airport to my hotel, studying the Community Corner schedule and researching the people who will be speaking or providing one-on-one interviews in our little semi-soundproof podcast room, studying the JavaOne site (on which I keep finding more interesting material)... and, last but not least, wondering how all the baby veggies we're putting into our gardens will fare while we're away for more than a full week (flying from Boston Friday afternoon, May 29, arriving back on Saturday, June 6).

Anyway, Terrence is among many who think the conference is approaching too fast, and in today's lead java.net weblog he highlights somenoteworthy bits and pieces intended to help the rest of us start our planning for the show.

Terrence starts out by noting that JavaOne itself isn't the only event happening that week at the Moscone Center: CommunityOne West happens on Monday through Wednesday (June 1-3):

CommunityOne is a free conference that focuses on open source innovation and collaboration. CommunityOne West runs for three days and starts Monday June 1st (the day before JavaOne). You can choose from over 70 sessions, lightning talks, hands-on labs, and a whole lot more. Signing up for CommunityOne West is FREE and includes access to the Pavilion as well as the JavaOne general sessions.

And he highlights Community Corner, where I'll be spending a lot of my time:

The Community Corner at CommunityOne West will be the gathering place for folks to to hear other talks, give a demo, participate in podcasts, meet community leaders and members of the Executive Board, or just relax and hang out for a bit. You can also volunteer to work in the Community Corner and receive a free java.net shirt.

Terrence is a key member of the Java Mobile & Embedded Community, and he highlights the three different JavaOne content tracks that will feature these technologies:

He also points out that there is a JavaOne Twitter channel and aJavaOne Facebook page. I had missed these, due to excessive rapid navigation away from the JavaOne Conference home page using the side menu, but they're right there in the middle of the page. Also, near the bottom of the home page, you'll find a link to the Advance Conference Guide (PDF), a 135-page guide that includes details on all the topics and sessions, including the BOFs. I still need to study that in more detail to see which technical sessions I might want to attend, when I'm not chatting with a member of the community in the java.net booth.

In the coming two weeks, I'll be posting more blogs of this type, highlighting what's ahead at JavaOne from various people's points of view; and I'll also be posting features about some of the speakers who will be visiting Community Corner. Note that there's still room to schedule a podcast about your project (though the schedule is more filled in each time I write that)...


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


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In Java Today, Kirill Grouchnikov announces Release candidate for Substance 5.2: "I am extremely pleased today to announce the availability of release candidate for version 5.2 of Substance look-and-feel(code-named Quebec). The release notes for version 5.2 contain the detailed information on the contents of this release which include the following: the new Dust skin...

The java.net Mac Java Community informs Mac Java users that in a message to the java-dev mailing list, Apple's Matt Drance has announcedJava for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 4 Developer Preview 1. "A new developer preview of Java for Mac OS X Leopard is now available athttp://connect.apple.com. Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 4 updates Java SE 6, Java SE 5.0 and J2SE 1.4 and contains many bug fixes and improvements to the Java support on Mac OS X. This preview requires Mac OS X 10.5.6 or later. This build has received only limited testing and should not be installed on a system with critical data. For more details, please see the Release Notes."

And Peligri announces Groovy and GroovyBlogs - This week's Webinar: "This week's webinar will cover the architecture of GroovyBlogs, a blog aggregator site build by Glen Smithusing Grails, GlassFish, OpenMQ and other technologies. Glen is also the author of Grails in Action. We are also trying to schedule a second speaker to provide a technical overview of Groovy. The presentation is on Thursday, May 14th, 12noon US Pacific...


In today's Weblogs, Terrence Barr looks forward to JavaOne 2009: Noteworthy bits and pieces: "As every year, JavaOne is approaching too fast ;-) Only three more weeks to go. I thought I'd collect some of the noteworthy bits and pieces to help you start your planning for the show. CommunityOne WestCommunityOne is a free conference that..."

Tim Boudreau announces a Sneak Preview: Java Card tools for NetBeans 6.7: "I've spent the last few months collaborating with the Java Card team to create Java Card plugins for NetBeans. It's not released yet, but here are some screen shots to whet your appetite..."

And Kohsuke Kawaguchi writes about Automatic Continuous Integration for Grails projects on Google Code: "Another cool stuff around Hudson, which automatically crawls Grails projects from Google Code and builds them on Hudson..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?" Voting is open through Thursday.


This week's Spotlightis Ed Ort's article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community: "Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some very interesting applications with it. This is a vibrant, creative, and extremely productive community..."


In the Forums, Shai Almog responds to a questioner Re: CalendarCellRenderer interface?: "Hi, calendar is under a major rewrite which we hope to complete for J1 (although this might be delayed). We will completely rearchitect the component but we probably won't have a renderer paradigm since the amount of data is fixed and the model is known in advanced. We will try to create a pragmatic way to customize the component though... "

nevermindrider asks about J2ME Insert images onto a svg background ?: "Hi! What I am trying to do is to load images (png) dynamically onto a screen that is build with SVG. I am using NetBeans VisualMidlet Designer. I have created an SVG file, and declared some text with the ID menuItem_X. Then I added an SVG-Menu and put my svg. File into it. The menu items show up and i can assign commands to them. so far so good. look here if u want to see a similiar menu screen: http://www.netbeans.org/kb/55/svg-tutorial.htmlOne menu item is e.g. Shop 1. Now when Shop 1 is opened a screen should show up with the same background... "

And alryndin is wondering How to set address for JAXRPCServlet to substitute REPLACE_WITH_ACTUL_URL: "Hi all, We have a problem. We use jax-rpc (unfortunately it is 1.03 and it is impossble to change it). Our service is running behind the load balancer and we use https. When jax-rpc forms address to change REPLACE_WITH_ACTUL_URL in WSDL it behaves in very strage way. It use external address pointed by user (let say www.company.com), but it doesn't take into account that request was made by https and adds port nubmer service is running on computer. For example if service (servlet container) is running on 8000 port and user submithttps://www.company.com/jax-rpc/service?WSDL then result in WSDL..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



There is a definite increase in the number of people expressing, as Terrence Barr has, that JavaOne 2009 is "approaching too fast"...  

This week's java.net Spotlight is Ed Ort's recent Sun Developer Network article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community. Ed begins the article by telling us that o-rama means "a greater-than-usual number, volume, or variety of a specified thing." His investigation of the applications JavaFX developers have been producing turned up some interesting applications, several examples of which Ed presents in detail (including code snippets) in his article.

The specific applications/toolkits Ed hightlights are:

  • TwitterFX: a JavaFX-based Twitter client and open source project led by IT Architect Steven Herod
  • MemeFX: an open source project initiated by Mauricio Aguilar with the intention of providing rich components that can be used in other JavaFX applications
  • WidgetFX: an open source platform, led by Stephen Chin, that makes it easy to create JavaFX widgets that can be run on the desktop

JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community is informative from several different points of view. First, it's interesting to see the visuals of the applications. Ed also provides links that let you launch the applications and see them in action.

Beyond that, Ed provides extensive code snippets that illustrate key aspects of the example apps, and links to the project home sites (where you can find the entire code base). And, there are comments from the project leads or owners, for example this from Stephen Chin:

"Once you get used to the new bind, trigger, and animation support, it is hard to go back to the old style of imperative, event-driven UI programming."

In closing, Ed provides a nice list of sites where you can find more JavaFX applications, sample programs, and demonstrations (which I'll reproduce here):

JavaFX is also the topic of our lead Java Today entry, an article by Jim Connors titled Registering Multiple Actions (or Handlers) in JavaFX. And this week's java.net poll, "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?", is attracting quite a response thus far.

Clearly, JavaFX is a technology that a lot of people find promising and exciting. It's going to be interesting to follow its progress.


In our Feature Article,

 
--> 

The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 78: JSR 290 XML User Interface Markup Language, in which JSR 290 developers Natalia Medvedenko and Petr Panteleyev talk about JSR 290 and the new power it will give Java ME developers. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

In Java Today, Jim Connors talks about Registering Multiple Actions (or Handlers) in JavaFX: "Java developers, especially those performing any type of GUI work, will ultimately encounter Java's event-driven programming paradigm. In short, if programmers want to act upon some kind of event they bundle up a chunk of code into a Java method, typically referred to as a handler, and register the handler with that event. Whenever that event occurs, the handler code..."

Tomas Brandalik of the Java ME SDK Team announced the PhoneME Feature MR4 plugin: "We've made a plugin for phoneME developers which helps to integrate their custom builds into Java ME SDK. PhoneME plugin is available on sdk autoupdate. A short notice will popup automatically when sdk is started or go to Tools -> Plugins and look for Java ME SDK 3 binding to PhoneME MR4. Choose to install plugin if you are phoneME developer and you're building your own virtual machine..."

And Doug Clarke and Shaun Smith talk about Java Persistence on the Grid: Approaches to Integration: "The Java Persistence API (JPA) is the enterprise standard for accessing relational data in Java. JPA provides support for mapping Java objects to a database schema and includes a simple programming API and expressive query language for retrieving mapped entities from a database and writing back changes made to these entities. JPA offers developers productivity gains..."


In today's Weblogs, Fabrizio Giudici talks about My demo at All4Web: "All4Web has been a pretty promising prime and attendees gave us a very good feedback. For sure we will make another in future, even better.I gave a quick demo of a JavaFX application, a very simple prototypical Contact List -..."

Rajiv Mordani announces Proposed Final Draft of Servlet 3.0 now available: "The proposed final draft of the Servlet 3.0 specification is now available at the JCP site . In addition to the specification, also refer to Shing Wai's blog describing in detail the ordering solution for fragments and the use of..."

And Marina Sum found an interesting Directory Application for iPhone: "In late April, OpenDS community manager Ludo Poitou wrote about the Directory application for his iPhone. The application not only returns search results of corporate directory servers, including Sun Directory Server and OpenDS, but also enables secure email and phone calls to contacts in the iPhone's address book..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?" Voting is open through Thursday.


This week's Spotlightis Ed Ort's article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community: "Although the JavaFX platform is only a few months old -- its initial full release was in December 2009 -- people are already building some very interesting applications with it. This is a vibrant, creative, and extremely productive community..."


In the Forums,sezgin_kucukkaraaslan, working with jax-ws, has an issue where the Response is coming but instances are not created: "Hi, I am using jax-ws 2.1.7 to consume some web services. I generated class files from wsdl definition with wsimport. Everything seems ok until this point. But when I try to invoke (a get request to db table) a web service which I expect to get some data, I got nothing. When I monitor the soap message coming with "com.sun.xml.ws.transport.http.client.HttpTransportPipe.dump" system property, I see that the message is actually coming, but the instances are not created. After some digging I realized that the response has extra fields (approval_history, comments,work_notes) which have not been declared in wsdl definition. Is this the main problem, or do I have to look somewhere else? ..."

Ming Dong announces the Invitation to Glassfish EA localization program: "Hi Everyone, Glassfish v3 is scheduled to be released in Sept. 2009. To help you get an early access (EA) of this new product in your own language, we plan the community project to localize the Glassfish EA program. We invite you to join us in this effort. The instructions and related information for participation, translation and testing are provided on the Glassfish G11n wiki page: http://wiki.glassfish.java.net/Wiki.jsp?page=G11nPlease go through the *General Information* and *How to Get Started* first, then review the process in project 1 (v3 EA software
translation) and project 2 (Testing). We have designed an online translation tool..."

And Dennis Gesker needs information about Dynamic Persistence Unit?: "Could someone recommend a site or tutorial on how to create a persistance unit on the fly? For instance... in my app my login and customer data is in a PrimaryDb. When I add a new customer to the PrimaryDb (and a reference new customer specific Db e.g. CUST1, CUST2, etc.) I want to be able to create a new PU on the fly without having to manually pull the app and edit the xml file and re-deploy. I've done this pretty regularly in the past when I I was using plain old jdbc but I'm looking for a good clean jpa example. Any recommendations?"


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



This week's java.net Spotlight is Ed Ort's recent Sun Developer Network article JavaFX App-O-Rama: Applications From the Community...  

Almost half of the participants in this past week's java.net poll believe that five years from now handheld devices and mobile phones will be the devices people use most to connect to the Internet. There were 500 total votes, with these final results:

Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?

  • 7.2% (36 votes) - Interactive television
  • 10.2% (51 votes) - Desktop computers
  • 25.8% (129 votes) - Notebook / laptop computers
  • 8.0% (40 votes) - Netbooks
  • 46.4% (232 votes) - Handheld devices / mobile phones
  • 2.4% (12 votes) - Other

In one sense, the results indicate that a lot of people share the view I expressed in The Growth of the Small, and the Disappearance of "Computers", where I said:

as computers grow smaller, they are "disappearing" into the devices that they power, everything from automobiles to netbooks to mobile phones. Twenty years from now, if someone asks a person who is an infant today "Do you own a computer?"--I wonder how long the pause will be before that person can provide an answer.

Clearly, we access the Internet using computers. But do we think of handheld devices and mobile phones as computers? Most users of such devices would not think about it that way.

I was a bit surprised about the relatively low vote totals for interactive television and netbooks. But, I suppose interactive television is one of those technologies that have been talked about and talked about -- yet, where is it? Do we know anyone who has it and loves it today?

As for netbooks, certainly they are a type of notebook / laptop computer, and not all that many people have one (I'm among the few). I put netbooks into the poll partly to create a more complete continuum in the answers: from large, stationary devices (I don't think anyone's going to carry their big-screen interactive television around) to increasingly less stationary items (computers of various sizes) to devices that are so entirely portable that it's easy to "lose" them by not remembering where we last put them (handheld / mobile devices).

In an insightful comment, jwenting called into question the basic concept of "connecting to the Internet" five years from now:

Quite possibly by then people won't consciously connect to anything. In fact that's the case already with DSL lines which are "always on", except for the moment special software is still used to retrieve the data (web browsers for example). I envision the integration to increase to the point where people no longer see the difference between local and remote data (a process already underway in some areas). This will of course require a change in the way internet connections are provided and billed...

Indeed, jwenting is right: I already experience some difficulty explaining to my wife (she's only been online for a few years) which data is local, which data is actually "on" another computer on our home network, which data is on the server in Utah that hosts her web site, etc. So, she sees a bunch of windows, applications, file manager directory and file icons, etc., on her Ubuntu Studio desktop, and she doesn't intuitively know which view represents data that resides locally on the disk drive in the box under her work table. To her it's all just a bunch of images that let her access something she wants to see or use if she clicks the icon.

So, if in five years we ask people (especially young people) "How do you connect to the Internet?" most may well look at us with a blank stare: "Huh? Connect?" -- or even (if they're sufficiently young): "What's the Internet?" It will be the same kind of blank stare that I expect will be returned if 20 years from now a 20 year old is asked "Do you own a computer?"

New poll: JavaFX adoption

This coming week's poll moves into an entirely different topic realm: the new rich internet applications (RIA) technology JavaFX. The specific question and answer options are:

How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?

  • It's growth will be explosive
  • Eventually it will be a dominant technology
  • It will endure as a secondary option
  • It will never be widely used
  • What's JavaFX?
  • I don't know; other

Voting is open through next Thursday, May 14.


In Java Today, Bytor reports the release of WebSpace Server 10.1 - It's happening again!: "On the heels of the successful 10.0 release, the WebSpace server team brings you another series of community and milestone builds for the next release, 10.1. The first in this series, WebSpace server 10.1 Community Build 1, is now available. Just like the 10.0 development effort, this series gives you a chance to exercise new features and updates that will be in the 10.1 release, leading up to the final release..."

Ken Fyten reports ICEsoft Open Sources ICEpdf - Leading Java PDF Rendering Library: "ICEsoft has released ICEpdf, their pure-Java PDF library and rendering engine under the MPL open source license. ICEpdf is a lightweight open source Java PDF rendering library that can be easily integrated within any Java server-side application (headless mode) as a PDF servlet (JSP or JSF)...

In Using Java Assertions? Use an Assertion-failed Breakpoint! , Zviki Cohen provides some useful debugging tips in Using Java Assertions? Use an Assertion-failed Breakpoint!: "I'm a big fan of assertions. I use them very often in my code as safeguards. I was very pleased when true, native assertions were introduced to Java: they allow adding more tests while keeping the code running faster when disabled. If you like assertions, you will appreciate the following tip. A failed assertion will throw a java.lang.AssertionError runtime exception..."


In today's Weblogs, Kohsuke Kawaguchi presents Hudson's growth chart: "Seiji Sogabe, a Hudson committer, put together Hudson's growth chart. He put together a chart of the hudson.war size from 1.100 to 1.300. This is another way to see the progress in Hudson. Off the top of my head, a big jump in 1.160 or so is probably the native Maven2 support..."

Terrence Barr tells us that Most session videos posted for M3DD: "Sorry for the delay ... we finally got around to processing and posting most of the remaining session videos. To find the videos please check out the links on the Sessions tab (both for Technical Sessions and Lightning Talks). Note that..."

And Karl Schaefer announces SwingX 1.0 in Sight: "SwingX 1.0 is coming to fruition. We are making the final dispositions of what's in and what's out for the 1.0 release. If you have any comments regarding the decision to include or remove something from the 1.0 target list, please see my thread in the SwingLabs Forums..."


Our new java.net Poll asks: "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology?" Voting will be open through next Thursday, May 14.


This week's Spotlight is The java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network. I wrote this. In it, I'm requesting that people who will be at JavaOne post their Twitter addresses as a comment to my post, so that people who cannot be at JavaOne this year (and there are a lot of people who wish they could attend, but can't) will be able to follow the events as they happen. If you'll be at JavaOne this year, please post your Twitter address, so we can keep everyone who wants to follow the conference well-informed.


In the Forums, sureshraju has an issue involving JAXB: Java code generation for Annotation tag elements: "Hi, Can anyone help me with the following issue? I have defined TestObject object in WSDL schema definition. This object has defined annotations (documentation and appInfo) in its schema. I am trying to get the JAVA code generated for these defined annotations. I am also posting my sample TestObject and CustomAppInfo elements schema definition. We are using CXF's WsdlToJava for the code generation tool. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. ..."

Ray Martin is wondering why, in his project, glassfish croaks: "I have three JBI service assemblies running in two Glassfish instances. Two service assemblies are running in one Glassfish node on Windows, the third service assembly is running in a Glassfish node on Linux. The first service assembly commands the second service assembly, receives a response, then the first service assembly commands the third service assembly and receives a response. Everything appears to have worked - but, in reality the Glassfish containing the third service assembly has died. The logs do not show anything..."

And lilwong asks How does SynchronizationServlet work?: "Here's what I noticed after a period of time using my Glassfish app cluster: - I have 2 servers, appserv01 and appserv02. - DAS running on appserv01 together with a node agent app01-agent. - Another node agent app02-agent running on appserv02. - I have a cluster my-app-cluster running with app01-instance and app02-instance on each server respectively. Typically, when I start up my cluster, the SynchronizationServlet will kick in and be done in about 10 seconds. Quick enough. Let's say I deploy an EAR file, say about 20MBs in size while the cluster is active. The deployment is successful and I can use the application immediately (as expected). However, if I were to stop and restart the cluster at this point of time (after deploying the EAR file)..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

Almost half of the participants in this past week's java.net poll believe that five years from now handheld devices and mobile phones will be...

Sonya Barry provides an update on java.net Community Corner 2009, in today's lead java.net weblog . Community Corner is a series of round-table discussions and podcasts that will take place Monday, June 1, through Thursday, June 4, at the java.net booth at this year's .

For developers, the schedule includes talks with Kirk Pepperdine (performance tuning), open Q&A with a Sun VP, Fabiane Nardon and Bruno Souza (JavaTools, user groups, etc.), and Josh Marinacci (JavaFX). There are also talks that will be of special interest to educators, including sessions with the Alice team, Paul Deitel (ATM Object case study), and Bruce Boyes and Ian Utting (Robotics and Greenfoot).

In addition to the high-profile presentations and panel discussions, we'll be recording interviews with many members of the java.net communtity and the larger Java community. See the full Community Corner schedule for details. All the Community Corner events will eventually be available online (in the form of videos or podcasts).

If you look at the Community Corner schedule, you'll see that there are still some open slots. If you'll be at JavaOne and you'd like to propose a podcast about your java.net project or community, visit the Java.net Community Corner 2009 wiki for details and instructions.


In Java Today, Danny Coward reports on the ongoing JDK 7 Watch: UI week: "It seems the Janitor is not the only one on JDK 7 watch these days. Last week's JDK 7 build was a GUI flavored one, with a couple of the most visible features added to Java SE 6u10 making it into the JDK 7 codebase. Alex blogged about the addition of Nimbus Look and Feel (did you know which L&F most people like best ?), and translucent and shaped windows are now in. There's also a rumor that JXLayer is nearly ready - this is the handy utility that helps you add effects to composite Swing GUIs, like..."

Kelly O'Hair ran into a painful CLASSPATH issue, which she describes in Painful Ant Bite: A generous CLASSPATH and ant.bat out of hell: "Had a lovely time (

Peligri announces This Week's Webinar - Ehcache, Architecture, Features and Usage Patterns, which takes place today, Thursday, at 11am US Pacific time: "This week's webinar is on Ehcache, the popular java-based cache - #1 among GlassFish users, according to a recent informal survey. This presentation, by Greg Luck, its lead maintainer and the Chief Architect of Wotif.com, covers the theory of caching, the architecture of Ehcache, Features of the product, Usage Patterns ..."


In today's Weblogs, Sonya Barry sends out a reminder about Community Corner Podcasts at JavaOne: "Take a look at the podcast and speaker schedule to see who will be in the Community Corner during JavaOne. Let me know if you'd like to be added to this list. We've scheduled quite a few VIP talks as well as round-table discussions and Q&A with teams from some popular projects. Right now the speaker schedule looks like this..."

Masood Mortazavi found that it can take only 43 seconds to build a database in Java: "On this MacBook Pro laptop I'm currently using (2.5 GHz, intel Core 2 Duo, 4GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, Mac OS-X 10.5.6), with lots of other apps running, it took exactly 43 seconds to build the Apache Derby database. Apache..."

And Sahoo extends his discussion on Using Felix Web Console in GlassFish v3: "Earlier I had written how one could use Apache Felix Remote Shell to administer OSGi runtime hosting GlassFish v3. This time, I shall be showing how you can use Felix Web Console to do the same..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?" Today (Thursday) is the last full day for voting.


This week's Spotlight is The java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network. I wrote this. In it, I'm requesting that people who will be at JavaOne post their Twitter addresses as a comment to my post, so that people who cannot be at JavaOne this year (and there are a lot of people who wish they could attend, but can't) will be able to follow the events as they happen. If you'll be at JavaOne this year, please post your Twitter address, so we can keep everyone who wants to follow the conference well-informed.


In the Forums, johnwenwft asks How can I run phoneME MR4 on phoneME emulator: "Hi guys, I try to run phoneME MR4 with phoneME emulator on window XP, Following the readme from this link "https://phoneme.dev.java.net/content/mr4/client_feature.html" But it seems something wrong,I got the message like below. Maybe it is because of lime? Anything comments would be appreciated! john..."

aardyb has questions involving JAX-WS with JAX-RPC in glassfish: "Hi - I'm fairly new to Web Services and want to get my JAX WS client to use a JAX-RPC Web Service. The client is running inside Glassfish 9.1_02, connecting to a legacy set of Web Services running on Sun App Server 8.2 implemented with JAX RPC. I am getting an com.sun.xml.ws.server.UnsupportedMediaException: Unsupported Content-Type: text/html Supported ones are: [text/xml When attempting to call the Web Service. I've installed TCPMON and can see that for the failing calls an HTTP POST is sent whilst for the successful ones it's a GET. I have seen several threads on the web saying it's a SOAP 1.1 vs SOAP 1.2 issue such as..."

And pakito wonders How to remove a J2EE server resource programmatically: "Hello!!! I am Pakito, we are researching trying to configure a JDBCResource programmatically in a Glassfish AppServer. So we create, using the AMX objects, the connection pool and the resource. All this was succesful. (Using: domainRoot.getDomainConfig().createJDBCConnectionPoolConfig and createJDBCResourceConfig().) Unfortunately, we are trying to remove programmatically the same resource we had created, we could remove the datasource and the JdbcResource using (domainRoot.getDomainConfig().removeJDBCResourceConfig(jdbcDataSourceName); and domainRoot.getDomainConfig().removeJDBCConnectionPoolConfig(jdbcDataSourceName)... "


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

Sonya Barry provides an update on java.net Community Corner 2009, in today's lead java.net weblog...

kfarnham

Can JavaFX Compete? Blog

Posted by kfarnham May 4, 2009

Sun's Joshua Marinacci, who works on the development of JavaFX, was recently interviewed by Scott Hanselman, in a podcast titled "JavaFX and the Web's Four Virtual Machines" (see today's lead Java Today story). Within the Java community itself, JavaFX certainly gets a lot of attention. A reasonable question, however, is: what chance does this new technology have for widespread adoption given the established strength of competing technologies?

A look at the Google Trends graph for JavaFX shows a recent significant increase in search levels, starting with the December 4, 2008 Slashdotted story "Sun Releases JavaFX" and stories that covered the news elsewhere.

Back then, some were quite skeptical about the possibilities for eventual widespread adoption of JavaFX. For example, in the CNET article "With JavaFX, Sun seeks new coders, new revenue", Illuminata analyst Jonathan Eunice said:

"I would like to think there's a role for Java on the client, but it's very late."

Eunice believes the incumbent players have an edge: JavaScript has matured as an interface language, Flash has many loyal developer fans, and Silverlight is powerful.

Indeed, the Google Trends plot for JavaFX, Silverlight shows a considerable lead for Silverlight in search volume; but it also suggests that after an initial surge of interest following Silverlight's release, interest in the technology may have plateaued. Look at the search trends for JavaFX, Silverlight, Flash, and you see that the mountain both JavaFX and Silverlight have to scale to overtake Flash is substantial indeed.

Still, time may be on the side of JavaFX. Ten years ago, who would have thought HP would today be selling the HP Mini 1120NR Netbook with Mobile Internet, designed to facilitate Internet access for activities such as email, IM, video chat (built-in camera), social networking, listening to music, doing homework, etc. (the seemingly perfect little box for many teens, college students, or on-the-road business people whos work is primarily Web- and/or document-centric)? The HP Mini 1120NR runs a tailored version of Ubuntu Linux! Can/will Linux someday displace Windows, or at least strongly compete, on the desktop? I'd say the HP Mini 1120NR certainly suggests that possibility. At a $329 price tag, there's not much room for pricey operating systems...

So, time may be on the side of JavaFX, provided that its development continues to warrant statements like James Sugrue recently made in his blog post "JavaFX: I'm Starting To Believe":

It always takes some time for new technologies to prove themselves, and JavaFX is no different. It still gets more than it's fair share of bad press, but as more examples using JavaFX appear, I'm starting to believe that it has it's place for Java developers.

Anyway, the history of JavaFX is quite brief at the moment. In Scott Hanselman's podcast interview of Joshua Marinacci you'll find the current perspective of a JavaFX insider, who's well aware of the competition, but who also sees the strengths and potential of JavaFX more clearly than almost anyone else can.


In Java Today, Scott Hanselman interviews Sun's Joshua Marinacci in a podcast on the topic JavaFX and the Web's Four Virtual Machines: "In this episode Scott talks to Joshua Marinacci from Sun, a Staff Engineer working on JavaFX. JavaFX, along with Flash and Silverlight battle to be The VM for the Web. We chat about how JavaFX approaches things and muse on who will win the web."

Peligri reports on A Hudson Release Milestone and New CLI with Groovy Support: "Two weeks ago Hudsonreached release 1.300 (yep, three hundred releases, and the latest is already 1.303!) and Kohsuke wrote a short Commemoration Post summarizing some of the accomplishments. By all metrics the project is doing very well: I'll argue that Hudson is now the leading CI tool, the traffic on USERS@Hudsonis over 1200/month and the project is very well grounded in the community with over 140 committers..."

And Kirill Grouchnikov writes about Translucent and shaped windows in JDK 7: "The latest weekly drop of JDK 7 (b57) has finally exposed the functionality of translucent and shaped windows as publicly supported APIs on thejava.awt.Window class. Bug 6802853 has tracked the progress of exposing these APIs previously available in 6u10+ in the internalcom.sun.awt.AWTUtilities class, and it's time to update the examples to use the new public APIs..."


In today's Weblogs, Alexander Potochkin informs us that JDK 7 is moving forward!: "Java desktop team is working hard to move JDK7 forward. I am happy to announce that Nimbus Look and Feel has been forward ported to JDK 7. Among all other changes, the latest build #b57 contains the fix for 6591875: Nimbus Swing Look and Feel. It is a real pleasure to see the Nimbus LaF under "javax.swing.plaf" package..."

Sebastien Dionne reports on his recent efforts to Enhance DisplayTag: "I did some enhancements to DisplayTag. You can start by reading my previous post on DisplayTag. There were some features that I needed and Displaytag didn't have them. I took the source code and I did it. The enchancements are not in Displaytag trunk, you will have to take my build or add it your self to the trunk. I didn't see recent activities on DisplayTag, but I would like to see them sometime to the repository. Now.. what are theses enhancements..."

And Sahoo provides instructions on Using filesystem operations to manage OSGi bundles in GlassFish: "I have intergrated Felix FileInstall bundle in GlassFish and here I will show you how you can deploy/undeploy OSGi bundles by copying/removing your bundles to/from a designated directory. A few days back, Jerome blogged about how to deploy OSGi bundles in GlassFish using "asadmin deploy --type=osgi" command. In his blog, he also mentioned why you should not copy your bundles to glassfish/modules directory..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?" Voting is open through Thursday, May 7.


This week's Spotlightis The java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network. I wrote this. In it, I'm requesting that people who will be at JavaOne post their Twitter addresses as a comment to my post, so that people who cannot be at JavaOne this year (and there are a lot of people who wish they could attend, but can't) will be able to follow the events as they happen. If you'll be at JavaOne this year, please post your Twitter address, so we can keep everyone who wants to follow the conference well-informed.


In the Forums,kbohnenberger has questions about about the open mq resend delay and resend limit: "Can you set the reply delay and reply limit on open mq? For example, I have a jms subscriber listening to a queue. The subscriber gets the message but something bad happens and an exception gets thrown back to open MQ. What seems to happen out of the box is that a nasty loop takes place. The client throws an exception, the servers resends the message and so on. Other JMS servers I';ve used have the idea of a resend delay and resend limit. So in my case, once openMQ got an exception back from the JMS subscriber, openMQ would wait forresend delay amount of time, then resend the message. If exceptions continued to get thrown by the JMS subscriber..."

neighbour is seeing a regular JVM crash with si_signo=SIGBUS: si_errno=Not enough space: "We've been facing the problem of JVM crash which is reproduced usually in 12 - 24 hours. This happens on Solaris/T1 and Solaris/Opteron hardware. The environment is: - JDK1.6.0_13, Solaris, Sun-Fire-T1000 (1 CPU, 1 GHz, 8 cores); - JDK1.6.0_13, Solaris, Sun-Fire X4200 (2 CPU, 2.2 GHz, dual core AMD Opteron 275). Unfortunately, we are not able yet to localize the bug (or the cause of the bug) and provide a simple test which reproduces the problem. But probably hs_err_pid*.log files in the attachment will provide some clue. I've found only one bug in the SUN bug DB similar to this one... "

And Shai Almog has an unfortunate situation, wherein Re: Focus problems are in love with me....HELP!: "I'm not entirely sure I understand the problem so let me try to rephrase that: When you scroll sideways you have some information which isn't focusable and when you return to your leftmost column you would like to be able to see that information. If this is the problem this is probably a bug in LWUIT, we have such as "trick" for the vertical scrolling (so you will see the form title when scrolling up) but we might not have such a solution for sideways scrolling. If this is the issue please file an issue within the issue tracker so we can follow the fix for this..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Sun's Joshua Marinacci, who works on the development of JavaFX, was recently interviewed by Scott Hanselman, in a podcast titled "JavaFX and the Web's Four Virtual Machines"...  

This week's java.net Spotlight is my invitation to people who will be at JavaOne this year to form an informal "java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network". There are a lot of people who wish they could attend JavaOne this year, but who can't attend. So, my thought is to provide these people with an opportunity to follow the conference via Twitter.

So, if you will be at JavaOne, please consider posting a comment to my "java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network" blog post, with your Twitter address and, if you'd like, a brief bio or description of your core interests and the type of sessions you plan to attend (or the events where you'll be speaking, hosting, etc.).

I won't be attending many sessions myself (I'll be primarily stationed at the java.net booth). But I will be talking to a lot of interesting people, including interviewing many people as part of the CommunityOne podcasts series. So, I'll be tweeting about that, along with everything else that happens.

So, if you wish you could attend JavaOne, but can't, visit thejava.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network home page between now and the conference, and you'll probably find some interesting people you'd like to follow via Twitter at the conference.

If you'd like to follow me on Twitter, my address is @diyincite.


In Java Today, Danny Coward returns from Mexico and provides us with a Java, JavaFX news round-up: "Marking a mask-free return from Mexico and provides us with a Java, JavaFX news round-up: "Marking a mask-free return from Mexico, the Janitorreturns to a pile of acivity in the Java and JavaFX world. As Remi noted, invokedynamic, the bytecode centerpiece of JSR 292 has been committed to JDK 7, as have method handles, good job since its on the list for M3, which is the release for JavaOne. And speaking of M3 features, SCTPis now in the latest weekly build. Things are shaping up ! ..."

Mozer helps developers get started with Maven in Five tips for successfully deploying Maven: "Maven is one of those things that people seem to hate rather intensely, but nevertheless adoption is steadily rising in the Java community. I've worked with Maven almost daily since the 1.0 betas, and here are five things that I think could help your team working more efficiently with Maven..."

Terrence Barr pointed out an interesting interview, Interview: Patrick Curran, chair of the JCP, published at the H Open site: "The H went to Qcon and sat down with Patrick Curran, chair of the Java Community Process for a chat about how the JCP is changing and looking for more transparency in all aspects of its work..."


In today's Weblogs, Ed Burns tells us about his recent JSF2 European Tour, Spring 2009: "I just returned from presenting JSF2 at three wonderful conferences in German speaking Europe. Mathema Frühjarcampus, in Erlangen, Germany Irian JSFDays in Vienna, Austria S&S; Verlag JAX in Mainz, Germany My trip to JAX included a side trip to Michael Hütterman’s Köln..."

Masood Mortazavi posted Derby, the Cauldron and Java DB: "Apache Derby project is the cauldron where Sun starts the forging of Java DB, the premier Java database in the world! Most recently, Knut Anders Hatlen, Java DB engineering and committer to the Apache Derby project, has been writing about the new features being shipped in Java DB 10.5. It is important to know that Java DB is a project 3 years in the making..."

And Carol McDonald announces that she will be Speaking at JavaOne: "preview of 2 Hands On Labs I am working on for JavaOne. I'm working on 2 Hands On Labs for JavaOne this year: * Building RIA Dojo and JavaFX Pet Catalog Clients for MySQL backed RESTful Web Services;* Developing Real-Time Revolutionary Web Applications, Using Comet and Ajax. You can read the HOL details and download some preview documentation and code below..."


This week's java.net Poll asks: "Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?" Voting is open through Thursday, May 7.


This week's Spotlightis The java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network. As I described above, I'm requesting that people who will be at JavaOne post their Twitter addresses as a comment to my post, so that people who cannot be at JavaOne this year (and there are a lot of people who wish they could attend, but can't) will be able to follow the events as they happen. If you'll be at JavaOne this year, please post your Twitter address, so we can keep everyone who wants to follow the conference well-informed.


In the Forums,Alex has an LWUIT question regarding CSS Class like styling: "HI friends! Sorry if my question has been already overdiscussed. In the LWUIT Developper guide you say that a theme file is very similar in spirit to a CSS file. I understand what you mean by that when considering application wide style properties of components. However, I was wondering if it was possible to define stale classes such as we would in real CSS. This would enable us to define a given style into a class and apply it (or not) to a given Component. Let's say I want all my textAreas to have blue background with white font. I would define it as it actually is possible in the LWUIT designer. And everything would be nice..."

Jeff Haynes is trying to choose between Metro vs Jaxws: "We are trying to determine if we should use Metro or just Jaxws. I realize that jaxws is a subset of Metro. We are using Metro to generate the Java client stubs from WSDL files. Then using those stubs to invoke the web services. Does Metro provide anything more than jaxws in this regard? Is there a comparison of these somewhere? If not, can someone from the Metro/Jaxws teams provide some input here? ..."

And vscarpenter Cannot deploy JAX-WS app to WebLogic 9.2: "Hi there. I am building an application with JAX-WS 2.1.1 (Build-Version: JAX-WS RI 2.1.1-b03) and deploy it as a war file under WebLogic 9.2 SP3 (Sun JVM 1.5.0_12). To make sure I am actually build and deploy a JAX-WS application, I created a simple class that returns a String and annotated it as a webservice. Since WebLogic bundles some of the classes that JAX-WS needs, I've added the following stanza to my weblogic.xml file..."


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



This week's java.net Spotlight is my invitation to people who will be at JavaOne this year to form an informal "java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter Network"...  

A lot of people will be at JavaOne 2009, but due to the present economy, there are a lot of other people who wish they could attend, but can't. For this reason, I'd like to create a "java.net JavaOne 2009 Twitter network" -- wherein people who would like to follow the events at JavaOne 2009 via Twitter will be able to "follow" a group of people who have the good fortune to actually be there.

If you'll be at JavaOne 2009 and you'd like to invite other Twitterers to follow your coverage of the conference, please post a comment below, stating your Twitter address and, if you'd like, some bio info.

My Twitter address is @diyincite -- which stands for "Do-It-Yourself incite" -- trying to "incite" the "do-it-yourself" creative mentality. It's a name I came up with when I was doing a project for O'Reilly on MySpace, trying to get some young people interested in programming.

I'm not a "big" Twitterer, historically. At JavaOne I'll be primarily stationed in the java.net booth. I won't be roaming around the conference or attending many sessions. However, I will be interviewing a lot of interesting people as part of the CommunityOne podcasts event. I'll surely be tweeting about those interviews, both in advance and after the fact -- and I'll post the links as the podcasts come online.

In addition, I expect to meet a lot of people (I'm asking them to stop by at the java.net booth). So, I'll be tweeting about that as well.

That's nice, but I need help from other people who will be at JavaOne -- people who will be speaking/presenting, developers who will be attending sessions I can't attend, etc. If you'll be at JavaOne, please consider posting your Twitter address in a comment below, so those who cannot attend will be able to follow your activities as well as mine, and stay informed regarding the innovations and the debates that will form the important content of the conference, and also participate in the general excitement and enthusiasm that we'll witness there.

The past two java.net pollstook the four core topics that will be featured at this year's JavaOne conference, and asked developers: 1) which technology is of greatest importance for the future of Java? and 2) which technology is the primary focus of your current work efforts?

Coincidentally, in today's lead Java Today story (Good News for Java Developers in a Tight Economy), Eugene Ciurana reports on another kind of "poll" -- the one where the marketplace decides which IT skills are currently most important by "voting" with money. I'll take a look at these "poll" results as well, after I review the results of our own last two java.net polls.

Two weeks ago, the greatest importance for the future of Java poll ended in a virtual dead heat, with Rich media applications and interactive content and Core technologies each garnering about 39% of the vote. Those results surprised me, but as I thought more about it, I realized that the relatively low vote totals for Mobility and Servicescould be due in part to the fact that the four JavaOne topic categories are not rigidly distinct, there's a lot of overlap between them.

Anyway, given developers' sense of which technologies are most important for the future of Java, one would hope that Java developers are fortunate enough to actually be working on those technologies. Assessing this was the point of the second poll. Here are the final results:

Which aspect of Java technology is the primary focus of your current work efforts?

  • 17.7% (66 votes) - Rich Media Applications and Interactive Content
  • 7.8% (29 votes) - Mobility
  • 14.2% (53 votes) - Services
  • 39.6% (147 votes) - Core Technologies
  • 13.4% (50 votes) - More than one of these
  • 7.0% (26 votes) - Other

So, based on these results, I think we'd have to say that, indeed, the majority of Java developers are actively working on the technologies we believe are most important for the future of Java.

What the marketplace "poll" is saying

Of course, our java.net "polls" are actually surveys, not scientifically-constructed polls. I consider "the marketplace" to be a more accurate and objective "poll" of the currentimportance of areas of technology. What someone is willing to pay someone else who has certain skills and core competencies is a fairly objective statement of the importance of that skill at that particular point in time. But I emphasis "current" and "at that particular point in time," because the marketplace provides only a snapshot of current value. As anyone who has investments in the stock market knows, today's price does not guarantee any particular future trend.

Nonetheless, the NetworkWorld article Some IT skills see pay hikes during downturn that was cited by Eugene Ciurana in his Good News for Java Developers in a Tight Economy post provides a relevant assessment of today's situation, and possibly a preview or forecast of the near-term future. Why possibly a preview? Well, I've studied the stock market for decades, and in a downturn, often the companies that somehow buck the downward trend become the powerhouses of the subsequent market boom.

So, here, in a downturn that many consider the worst since the global Great Depression in the 1930s, we see certain IT skills becoming more valuable, more pricey for their consumers, our employers. Whereas demand for employees in general continues to plummet worldwide, demand for certain skill sets is increasing -- i.e., these skill sets are bucking the trend.

Which particular technology skill sets? Look at these year-to-year pay increases:

  • +28% - Linux
  • +25% - Apache
  • +25% - Sybase
  • +20% - Java
  • +20% - HTTP
  • >14% - PHP
  • >14% - SAP
  • >14% - Unix

Now, these increases are for "skills" -- which I take to mean that these are the year-over-year changes in consulting rates. I doubt companies are providing these types of raises to employees at this time. But that's the trade-off between consulting and being a full-time employee. I'm sure most of us know that consulting rates fluctuate a lot, and the amount of work you have as a consultant can also rapidly fluctuate between 90 hours a week and 10 hours a week.

So, what's the consulting marketplace saying about Java? The need for skilled Java professionals is rising within the context of a broad global economic downturn. Java, as a technology, is bucking the trend. That's very good news for us all.

New java.net poll

The new java.net poll is now posted. This one veers into the consumer hardware aspect of technology, and isn't entirely Java-specific. Yet, the answer to the question surely has relevance for Java and Java developers. The new question is:

Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?

  • Interactive television
  • Desktop computers
  • Notebook / laptop computers
  • Netbooks
  • Handheld devices / mobile phones
  • Other

Please take a moment and vote!


In Java Today, Eugene Ciurana discovered some Good News for Java Developers in a Tight Economy in a recent NetworkWorld article: "Some IT skills see pay hikes during downturn. Java, Linux, virtualization and business process skills among those seeing an increase in pay. Budget dollars may be tight, but enterprise IT departments can't do without the technology skills, talent and certifications they need to better navigate a down economy..."

Dan Evans announced the Jt - Java Pattern Oriented Framework (Jt 3.8) release: "Jt3.8 has been released. Jt is a pattern oriented framework for the rapid implementation of Java applications. Jt implements many well-known patterns including Data Access Objects (DAO), GoF design patterns and J2EE patterns. Jt3.8 features portal components and capabilities: Account and Profile management; Mailing list capabilities; Photo upload capabilities..."

bytor posted Deep Dive: Sun GlassFish WebSpace Server, which talks about an interview series he participated in recently: "As part of the theWebSpace Server 10 release, Ed Ort (from java.sun.com) and I sat down to do a deep dive webcast for GlassFish WebSpace Server. We tried to cover a lot of ground, and it ended up being split into 4 parts (intro, administrator, developer, end user). The first two parts are now available!...


In today's Weblogs, James Gosling talks about The Developer Cloud: Netbeans 6.7 + Kenai: "One of the many interesting things we've been working on lately is the Developer Cloud. There are two major components to it. One is the cloud infrastructure itself: Kenai a much-more-than-a-forge collection of developer facilities that allows you to assemble project areas from a selection of services that range from several SCM systems, bug management systems, wikis and forums. There's a lot more stuff in the pipeline for Kenai, but it's pretty impressive already. The other major component is the tool support that is showing up in NetBeans 6.7..."

Jan Haderka provides instruction on Magnolia Cache in clustered environment: "Look into details and pitfalls of caching content in Magnolia instances with clustered JCR repository underneath. I might have mentioned something aboutcache in Magnolia here before, today let's look at another aspect of it. While in general Magnolia follows well known and understood publish/subscribe model when it comes to page activation (the activation is always done in direction from authoring to public instance), there is one notable exception to this model - public generated content. This it the kind of content like forums, page comments, etc."

And Fabrizio Giudici writes about semantic technologies in The Observation API (hey, it's not the Observable pattern): "Crossing fingers, I can declare myself out of a load peak and resume with fully technical blogs after a pause of mostly useless "opinional" posts. As I said in February, I'm going to post on my blog a series about the use of Semantic Technologies and how they are being used in some of my projects. Today let's start giving a small domain model and then design a related abstract API. In the next post I'll show you how to implement it on the top of a RDF triple store."


As I mentioned above, starting today we have a new java.net Poll: "Which device will people use most to connect to the Internet five years from now?" Voting is open through next Thursday, May 7.


This week's Spotlightis The Developer Insight Series, Part 2: Code Talk, in which Janice J. Heiss asks renowned developers about the keys to writing good code: "In Part Two, we hear code advice from five distinguished developers: Joshua Bloch and Masood Mortazavi echo Goetz's advice to keep code simple. Jaron Lanier and Victoria Livschitz want to radically change the way code is created. And renowned bug fixer Brian Harry provides tips on bug fixing while emphasizing what the process can teach us."


In the Forums,christiano_carrilho has an issue with MDB Cluster not consuming JMS Queue: "Server 1 (S1), Server 2 (S2) and Server 3 (S3) are in the cluster running an same application. This application is a MDB to consume messages from a broker (OpenMQ) remote (Server 4 - S4), which is not in the cluster. I'm using the broker OpenMQ 4.3 that is installed on the outside of S4 Glassfish, in standalone mode. The S1, S2, S3 are in the cluster with Glassfish 2.1 B60. The following is happening: The cluster of servers S1, S2, S3 are not able to consume messages from the broker. Nothing happens. Messages are sent to the broker and not consume MBD. If I set S1, S2 and S3 without cluster, the MDB consume messages from the broker normally. What may be happening?"

iggar needs help with JAAS with standalone JavaFx + remote EJB: "Hey all, I don't seem to get my head around JAAS in JavaFx. I almost had it, but I worked with the ProgrammaticLogin and now i found out this isn't the way it should go because of it's lack of portability. Can anyone here point me in the right direction of what I should do, because I keep on reading about implementing loginmodules, callbackhandlers, realms and so on... Most of these things are very new to me, so if anyone could provide a step-by-step overview, I could start looking on the internet for more info. I'm deploying my EJB jar on Glassfish v2ur2 in netbeans 6.5..."

And scit continues a conversation Re: Virtual Servers not working correctly on Glassfish: "Because this has been causing me so much aggravation, I went ahead & tried yet another clean install of glassfish v2.1 on a brand new Ubuntu 8.04 install... Loaded up all the webapps, directed my external IP (and thus all the DNS names for the virtual hosts) at it. STILL same exact problem reproduced. I am flabbergasted that I don't see anyone else having this same problem in my searches. Again, this all works fine on Tomcat. Through my further hours of struggles and trying this over and over, I finally came up with just the right oddball way of steps to get it all working correctly: 1. Deployed the webapp that was to serve as the default webapp for the system FIRST... "


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