Skip navigation

This past week's java.net poll about the emerging JDK 7 drew 488 votes and almost 2000 words of commentary and debate by the voters (in 16 comments). The specific poll question and results were:

What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?

  • 10.4% (51 votes) - It's a major step forward
  • 30.3% (148 votes) - It includes some important features
  • 16.3% (80 votes) - It's a typical JDK release
  • 41.5% (203 votes) - The most significant problems are not addressed
  • 1.2% (6 votes) - Other

Summing the results for the first two responses tells us that just under 41% of the voting expressed a positive point of view toward JDK 7. The poll participants were thus fairly evenly divided with respect to having a positive or negative view of JDK 7, while 16% consider the upcoming JDK 7 release to be "typical".

The comments span the gamut, from endlesslove's sarcastic

I wonder what's so hard in fixing that RFE [bug 6530906]. Maybe in the year 2025, that RFE will graduate from its state of being "accepted"?

to arooaroo's

JDK doesn't seem a massive step forward. I'm pleased to see the nio2 improvements though.

to massimoh's "Jigsaw is big" comment, which states, in part:

My biggest concern is that Jigsaw is done right and delivers an elegant solution to the issues. If they do that, then JDK7 will be a major evolution.

and dutchiedave's

I really don't understand the issue people have with bloat. The number of people that are negatively effected by the size of the JVM is very small. Whether the JVM is 10MB or 15MB really makes no difference to the majority of java clients. Useful features should be implemented in a timel manner and 'bloat' should not be used as a reason not to implement them.

A very big discussion (12 comments) was instigated bycowwoc's brief comment "Reified Generics Please":

Generics through erasure was a major eyesore introduced in Java5. Please improve readability by fixing Generics in Java7!

linuxhippy initiated the "bloat" discussion thatdutchiedave responded to, by aiming this atcowwoc:

@cowwoc: The current generics can't be simply removed, so they will stay. Can you imagine what another (second!) generic implementation would do to the Java language. To be honest I am against bloating the language any further, and try to concentrate on a next-generation Java successor like scala.

Which, not unexpectedly, launched a discussion about Scala.scotty69 challenged the assumption that you can "just use Scala" as the solution to Java inadequacies:

Please help me: I have - say - 200.000+ lines of 3 years old Java code, mature, thoroughly tested, battle proof. My customer wants me to add feature X with about 2.000 lines of new code and and 3.000 lines of existing code to be changed, tight budget as usual. Do your really think that it's a good idea to to introduce Scala in this scenario to "extend Java classes, call methods and so on"? Do you have experience in mixing a large legacy Java codebase with new Scala elements? Can you tell me how the tool-chain could look like?

Which brought a very lengthy response from aehrenr, which brought another response from scotty69, ... See the poll results page for the full discussion.

New poll: Project Kenai

This week's new java.net poll asks What do you think about Project Kenai? Project Kenai is Sun's new "onramp for the developer cloud experience of tomorrow, where you can host your open source projects and code, as well as find and collaborate with developers of like mind." Voting will be open through next Thursday.


In Java Today, Terrence Barr offers Congratulations to our Java ME Rock Stars!: "The JavaOne 2009 Rock Stars were just published. Hinkmond Wong (phoneME Project Lead) andEric Arsenau (Principal Investigator, SquawkVM) made the list.Congratulations!"

The java.net Mac Community points us to the Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 5 Developer Preview (9M3092): 'A post on Apple's java-dev listannounces the release of Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 5 Developer Preview (9M3092). "Please download the new developer preview of Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 5 (9M3092) at https://connect.apple.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/MemberSite.woa/wa/getSoftware?bundleID=20436. Java for Mac OS X 10.5 Update 5 updates..."'

Surikov announces the CRUDfx SDK: "The aim of the CRUDfx SDK is to create tools for CRUD applications development. CRUDfx SDK: Layouts, Grid, Tree, Text/Password components, Localization tools..."


In today's Weblogs, James Gosling has been having some Fun with Dukethis summer: "It's been a really weird summer, mostly in a good way. Easily the weirdest summer of my professional career. A lot of stuff has been going on, much of which would make good blog material, but none of it can be blogged about. The Oracle transition can't happen fast enough. I have spent some time on a silly but fun project: moving the Duke artwork..."

Carol McDonald writes about JPA 2.0 Concurrency and locking: "JPA 2.0 Concurrency: Optimistic and Pessimistic locking, how, why, advantages, disadvantages: Optimistic locking lets concurrent transactions process simultaneously, but detects and prevent collisions, this works best for applications where most concurrent transactions do not conflict. JPA Optimistic locking allows anyone to read and update an entity, however a version check is made upon commit and an exception is thrown if the version was updated in the database since the entity was read..."

And Fabrizio Giudici says Lombok needs NetBeans fans (and Idea too...): "Project Lombok has been talked about at the JavaPosse mailing list. In short, it's a tool that hooks into the compiler for generating boilerplate code, driven by annotations, for things such as JavaBean bound properties. For more information, have a..."


In the Forums,deeppra has Problem while instlling Wonderland module: "Hi, i downloaded wonderland 0.5 dev 5 version and able to run normally. I tried to create a custom 2D application similar to the one which is already there in the wonderland/modules/foundation/swingtest. I created using netbeans and build the jar files. Then i used the wonderland console to deploy the module but i am getting an error message like this: "Unable to deploy the module please try again but clicking the browser back button" ..."

laguz sees Problems When Starting JTHarness: "Hi all, I would like to track down some problems regarding the JUnit integration of JTHarness. To do this I would like to start the graphical UI and open a testsuite. Unfortunately I am not able to do that. All I get is an almost plain window where the File menu does not provide the possibility to open a testsuite. In addition the startup wizard does not show up although it should, shouldn't it?..."

And nithyas asks about Using a custom keystore in prelude, how to?: "Hi All, I am trying to follow the same procedure I used with other glassfish versions. Create a custom keystore and point to it in domain.xml, import the root ca into container jdk and point to this as the truststore. This used to work seamlessly with other glassfish version. However with prelude, I am not able to use it. Fails with message ..."


The current Spotlightis the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What do you think about Project Kenai?". Voting will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 83: JATAF panel discussion: "Excerpts of the panel discussion for the launch of JATAF (the Java Application Terminal Alignment Framework) at JavaOne." OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



This past week's java.net poll about the emerging JDK 7 drew 488 votes and almost 2000 words of commentary and debate...  

Janice Heiss has just published her recent interview with Java Champion Adam Bien on the Sun Developer Network. Adam is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns -- Rethinking Best Practices. He was named a Java Rock Star for his JavaOne 2009 session "Energy, CO2 Savings with Java Platform, Enterprise Edition and More: Project GreenFire".

Project GreenFire is a java.net project that aims to efficiently manage and control home heating to save energy. The project applies GlassFish, Java EE, EJB 3 timer service, JavaFX, SunSPOT, and more. Adam has deployed Project GreenFire in his own home, resulting in a 20-30% energy savings at present (his objective is to ultimately make the savings higher). While I wasn't able to attend Adam's prize-winning session at JavaOne, I did the privilege of speaking with him in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast.

Adam has an interesting point of view on cloud computing. In response to Janice's question "What is your basic understanding of how cloud computing works?" Adam said:

I see two unrelated concepts called cloud computing. The first one is related to grid computing, where parallelizable tasks are distributed to independent computing nodes and then aggregated to a consistent result... The other paradigm is a virtual, private or public, data-computing center with an accessible API.

These paradigms also differ in their usage models. Grid computing is intended to be used by a few power users who need a considerable amount of computing power. On the other hand, in cloud computing, significantly more users access the machines with relatively low resource utilization.

If you think about something like Amazon Web Services, this makes a lot of sense. Many start-ups use Amazon because it's an inexpensive way to "have" a data center that will scale rapidly if the need for that ever arises (they hope will happen, of course). Most of these start-ups are offering services to individuals, and the sudden increase in required computing power would come from their service suddenly catching on, becoming suddenly popular.

Meanwhile, most of the work I've done has been in scientific/engineering data centers, where we've deployed clusters of high powered machines to automatically process sensor data streams (for example, from satellites) and apply complex mathematical modeling algorithms, and simulations. That's the grid computing application. This type of processing could also be done in the cloud, if we wanted to do it that way. As Adam notes:

While these two models are conceptually opposite, the underlying technology could be very similar.

Janice and Adam go on to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of Java EE for the cloud, Rich Internet Applications (RIA) and cloud computing, and open source in the cloud. Adam closed with some comments on Java EE that many people might find surprising:

Java EE has become extremely lightweight. The whole GlassFish v3 EJB 3.1 container is smaller than one megabyte, can be dynamically installed and uninstalled, and is surprisingly "elastic." You can develop and deploy an application with only a few annotations.

Also, Java EE is supported by multiple application servers, so your application is not dependent on a single vendor. Since Java EE 5, applications have become portable as well: There is no vendor-specific code or even XML configuration required.

Moving your application from one server to another is not an empty slogan. Java EE is therefore more interoperable than the cloud itself and can be used as a lean abstraction layer between the bare cloud and your business logic.

Adam convincingly talked about the lightweight nature of modern Java EE in the Communtity Corner podcast he recorded with me at JavaOne. I think he's right about this.

As you can tell from the few snippets I've quoted here, every interview with Adam Bien yields a lot of very interesting, thought provoking conversation. Read Janice's complete interview with Adam for all the details.


In Java Today, Janice Heiss interviewed Java Champion Adam Bien on Java EE and Cloud Computing at JavaOne: "java.sun.com (JSC): What is your basic understanding of how cloud computing works? Bien: I see two unrelated concepts called cloud computing. The first one is related to grid computing, where parallelizable tasks are distributed to independent computing nodes and then aggregated to a consistent result. Frameworks like Hadoop, map-reduce algorithms, are an example of this approach..".

Peligri announces the Schedule for GlassFish v2.1.1: "The next public release in theGlassFish v2 Family is GlassFish v2.1.1. The key dates are: Hard Code-Freeze: Aug. 24; Release Candidates: Sept. 9 - Oct. 7;Release Oct. 28..."

John Rose reminds us that there are only 36 shopping days until the JVM Language Summit: "If you (like me) are someone who actually enjoys contemplating the details of how languages turn into bytecodes and thence into wicked-fast machine code... If you lose sleep wondering about the joint future of programming languages and managed runtimes (especially the JVM)... If you think VM and language designers can save the world from a dystopian future of multi-core computers with no software to run on them... Please read the enclosed Call for Participation! ..."


In today's Weblogs, Jim Driscoll points us to a New David Geary Article on JSF 2: "David Geary has the third of his three part series of JSF 2 articles up. If you're getting started with JSF 2, go check it out - lots of good information there."

And Arun Gupta describes how to Track your running miles using JRuby, Ruby-on-Rails, GlassFish, NetBeans, MySQL, and YUI Charts: This blog introduces a new application that will provide basic tracking of your running distance and generate charts to monitor progress. There are numerous similar applications that are already available/hosted and this is a very basic application. What's different about this ? The..."

In the Forums, Paul Sterk posts an announcement in Update: wiki migration: "All, The migration of the GlassFish, OpenESB, Metro and Update Center wikis is scheduled for tomorrow afternoon. The exact time is yet to be confirmed, but is expected later in the afternoon, PT. Please complete your writes to the wikis by tomorrow at 1pm PT. I will send another email tomorrow confirming the times. I will also notify when the cutover is completed. In the meantime, please try the new wikis and report any problems to me. I have tested authn, edit/save, attachment upload/download and page navigation. All looks in order so far..."

chrjohn asks How to handle OpenMQ failover in MDB?: "Hi all, we are currently doing some test with the OpenMQ failover. We have two Glassfish nodes which each have their OpenMQ broker in REMOTE mode. With a stand-alone program we are sending 100 messages to a persistent queue where an MDB listens to. The MDB sends the message on to another queue. While the sending of the 100 msgs to the MDB is in progress we stop the broker that is used. Now there are a lot of Exceptions but once the failover process is done we see that not all messages were delivered. How should I react on such Exceptions? Should I try to resend the messages again? We found some examples..."

lynggaard is working with Jax WS (and Jax RPC) + security +weblogic 10.3: "I am migrating some webservices from weblogic 8.1 to weblogic 10.3, and I have some questions regarding security handling. In weblogic 8.1 we used a WSDL to java approach but in weblogic 10 we would like to use Java to WSDL and use annotations as much as possible. However I cannot figure out how to enable username+password token as webservice security. * I have found a weblogic annotation (which only works for JAX RPC not JAX WS), but I can not seem to find any standard annotation which specify security.. Have I looked the wrong places or is there none? ..."

And aventuri has questions regarding Phoneme GPL java vm running on SH4 processor: "Hi guys, Jet is Avalpa middleware for interactive digital set top box. It's based on phoneme, the java virtual machine GPL licensed. Jet is actually using the PowerPc porting of the phoneme vm. Anyway, we recently started to evaluate, both technically and economically, the porting of Jet to a high definition System on Chip (SOC) running a SH4 CPU core. As a successful first proof of concept, as of today 29.7.2009, we are releasing, GPL v2 licensed, the missing files to have the latest phoneme svn compile and execute succesfully on the SH4 cpu. More info about this stuff here..."


The current Spotlightis the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?". Today, Thursday, is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: JATAF panel discussion: "Excerpts of the panel discussion for the launch of JATAF (the Java Application Terminal Alignment Framework) at JavaOne." OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Janice Heiss has just published her recent interview with Java Champion Adam Bien on the Sun Developer Network...  

Janice Heiss has just published her recent interview with Java Champion Adam Bien on the Sun Developer Network. Adam is the author of Real World Java EE Patterns -- Rethinking Best Practices. He was named a Java Rock Star for his JavaOne 2009 session "Energy, CO2 Savings with Java Platform, Enterprise Edition and More: Project GreenFire".

Project GreenFire is a java.net project that aims to efficiently manage and control home heating to save energy. The project applies GlassFish, Java EE, EJB 3 timer service, JavaFX, SunSPOT, and more. Adam has deployed Project GreenFire in his own home, resulting in a 20-30% energy savings at present (his objective is to ultimately make the savings higher). While I wasn't able to attend Adam's prize-winning session at JavaOne, I did the privilege of speaking with him in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast.

Adam has an interesting point of view on cloud computing. In response to Janice's question "What is your basic understanding of how cloud computing works?" Adam said:

I see two unrelated concepts called cloud computing. The first one is related to grid computing, where parallelizable tasks are distributed to independent computing nodes and then aggregated to a consistent result... The other paradigm is a virtual, private or public, data-computing center with an accessible API.

These paradigms also differ in their usage models. Grid computing is intended to be used by a few power users who need a considerable amount of computing power. On the other hand, in cloud computing, significantly more users access the machines with relatively low resource utilization.

If you think about something like Amazon Web Services, this makes a lot of sense. Many start-ups use Amazon because it's an inexpensive way to "have" a data center that will scale rapidly if the need for that ever arises (they hope will happen, of course). Most of these start-ups are offering services to individuals, and the sudden increase in required computing power would come from their service suddenly catching on, becoming suddenly popular.

Meanwhile, most of the work I've done has been in scientific/engineering data centers, where we've deployed clusters of high powered machines to automatically process sensor data streams (for example, from satellites) and apply complex mathematical modeling algorithms, and simulations. That's the grid computing application. This type of processing could also be done in the cloud, if we wanted to do it that way. As Adam notes:

While these two models are conceptually opposite, the underlying technology could be very similar.

Janice and Adam go on to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of Java EE for the cloud, Rich Internet Applications (RIA) and cloud computing, and open source in the cloud. Adam closed with some comments on Java EE that many people might find surprising:

Java EE has become extremely lightweight. The whole GlassFish v3 EJB 3.1 container is smaller than one megabyte, can be dynamically installed and uninstalled, and is surprisingly "elastic." You can develop and deploy an application with only a few annotations.

Also, Java EE is supported by multiple application servers, so your application is not dependent on a single vendor. Since Java EE 5, applications have become portable as well: There is no vendor-specific code or even XML configuration required.

Moving your application from one server to another is not an empty slogan. Java EE is therefore more interoperable than the cloud itself and can be used as a lean abstraction layer between the bare cloud and your business logic.

Adam convincingly talked about the lightweight nature of modern Java EE in the Communtity Corner podcast he recorded with me at JavaOne. I think he's right about this.

As you can tell from the few snippets I've quoted here, every interview with Adam Bien yields a lot of very interesting, thought provoking conversation. Read Janice's complete interview with Adam for all the details.


In Java Today, Janice Heiss interviewed Java Champion Adam Bien on Java EE and Cloud Computing at JavaOne: "java.sun.com (JSC): What is your basic understanding of how cloud computing works? Bien: I see two unrelated concepts called cloud computing. The first one is related to grid computing, where parallelizable tasks are distributed to independent computing nodes and then aggregated to a consistent result. Frameworks like Hadoop, map-reduce algorithms, are an example of this approach..".

Peligri announces the Schedule for GlassFish v2.1.1: "The next public release in theGlassFish v2 Family is GlassFish v2.1.1. The key dates are: Hard Code-Freeze: Aug. 24; Release Candidates: Sept. 9 - Oct. 7;Release Oct. 28..."

John Rose reminds us that there are only 36 shopping days until the JVM Language Summit: "If you (like me) are someone who actually enjoys contemplating the details of how languages turn into bytecodes and thence into wicked-fast machine code... If you lose sleep wondering about the joint future of programming languages and managed runtimes (especially the JVM)... If you think VM and language designers can save the world from a dystopian future of multi-core computers with no software to run on them... Please read the enclosed Call for Participation! ..."


In today's Weblogs, Jim Driscoll points us to a New David Geary Article on JSF 2: "David Geary has the third of his three part series of JSF 2 articles up. If you're getting started with JSF 2, go check it out - lots of good information there."

And Arun Gupta describes how to Track your running miles using JRuby, Ruby-on-Rails, GlassFish, NetBeans, MySQL, and YUI Charts: This blog introduces a new application that will provide basic tracking of your running distance and generate charts to monitor progress. There are numerous similar applications that are already available/hosted and this is a very basic application. What's different about this ? The..."

In the Forums, Paul Sterk posts an announcement in Update: wiki migration: "All, The migration of the GlassFish, OpenESB, Metro and Update Center wikis is scheduled for tomorrow afternoon. The exact time is yet to be confirmed, but is expected later in the afternoon, PT. Please complete your writes to the wikis by tomorrow at 1pm PT. I will send another email tomorrow confirming the times. I will also notify when the cutover is completed. In the meantime, please try the new wikis and report any problems to me. I have tested authn, edit/save, attachment upload/download and page navigation. All looks in order so far..."

chrjohn asks How to handle OpenMQ failover in MDB?: "Hi all, we are currently doing some test with the OpenMQ failover. We have two Glassfish nodes which each have their OpenMQ broker in REMOTE mode. With a stand-alone program we are sending 100 messages to a persistent queue where an MDB listens to. The MDB sends the message on to another queue. While the sending of the 100 msgs to the MDB is in progress we stop the broker that is used. Now there are a lot of Exceptions but once the failover process is done we see that not all messages were delivered. How should I react on such Exceptions? Should I try to resend the messages again? We found some examples..."

lynggaard is working with Jax WS (and Jax RPC) + security +weblogic 10.3: "I am migrating some webservices from weblogic 8.1 to weblogic 10.3, and I have some questions regarding security handling. In weblogic 8.1 we used a WSDL to java approach but in weblogic 10 we would like to use Java to WSDL and use annotations as much as possible. However I cannot figure out how to enable username+password token as webservice security. * I have found a weblogic annotation (which only works for JAX RPC not JAX WS), but I can not seem to find any standard annotation which specify security.. Have I looked the wrong places or is there none? ..."

And aventuri has questions regarding Phoneme GPL java vm running on SH4 processor: "Hi guys, Jet is Avalpa middleware for interactive digital set top box. It's based on phoneme, the java virtual machine GPL licensed. Jet is actually using the PowerPc porting of the phoneme vm. Anyway, we recently started to evaluate, both technically and economically, the porting of Jet to a high definition System on Chip (SOC) running a SH4 CPU core. As a successful first proof of concept, as of today 29.7.2009, we are releasing, GPL v2 licensed, the missing files to have the latest phoneme svn compile and execute succesfully on the SH4 cpu. More info about this stuff here..."


The current Spotlightis the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?". Today, Thursday, is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: JATAF panel discussion: "Excerpts of the panel discussion for the launch of JATAF (the Java Application Terminal Alignment Framework) at JavaOne." OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Janice Heiss has just published her recent interview with Java Champion Adam Bien on the Sun Developer Network...  

The Java Tools Community has reached a milestone with the publication of the 200th issue of the Java Tools Community Newsletter. That's quite a testament to perseverance and desire to share information with the broader community by the newsletter team. It takes a lot of time to decide what information is relevant and might be of interest to a community, then collate it into a publishable form. I know about this, since it's a primary task in my position as java.net editor, in creating the java.net front page every day.

The first issue of the Java Tools Community Newsletter came out almost five years ago, on August 7, 2004. That issue featured the ofbiz project, an open source enterprise automation software (ERP, CRM, E-Business / E-Commerce, etc.) project; Which4J, a simple utility app that helps you determine where classes are being loaded from; and babaxp, a development cycle tool (now discontinued by the authors, but the code is available on request).

The newsletter was published weekly at first. Soon it switched into its current, less rigid schedule. 200 issues have been published in five years, which averages out to a new issue every 9 days -- still quite a rigorous production schedule!

The current issue features 17 items under the "Tool News" banner, including the Open JDK Milestone 4 news I posted in today's "Java Today" section. Other interesting news items include the Apache CouchDB 0.9.1 release (CouchDB is "a distributed, fault-tolerant and schema-free document-oriented database accessible via a RESTful HTTP/JSON API"); Borland Introduces Silk 2009 ("Silk 2009 is a comprehensive software test suite designed to support the testing needs of both Agile and traditional development teams by simplifying testing activities..."); and Oracle Coherence 3.5 ("Oracle Coherence is an in-memory data grid solution, enabling organizations to predictably scale mission-critical applications by providing fast and reliable access to frequently used data").

Each issue of the newsletter also includes the "Tools Tips" section. This issue's tip is "An Extreme Feedback device for Hudson using the Radiator View Plugin." The Radiator View Plugin "provides a new View implementation displaying project status in a highly visible manner" -- useful for keeping the development team readily informed of project and build status in continuous integration development environments.

Each issue also provides news from the projects in the Java Tools Community, introduces new projects, and lists projects that have graduated (reached Release 1.0).

You can view the entire archive of Java Tools Newletters on the Java Tools newsletter history page.


In Java Today JavaTools Community Newsletter - Issue 200 is now available: "A new edition of the newsletter is available, with news, new projects and tips! If you want to receive the newsletter by email, please subscribe the announcements mailing list - or read the current issue here."

The Java Tools Community points out OpenJDK7 / JDK7 release: Milestone 4 in their latest newsletter. Xiomara, of the JDK team, says: "JDK 7 build 66 which is the final build for Milestone 4 has been released! The last milestone (M3) was released during the JavaOne time frame and since then, the teams have been making progress by fixing bugs and forward porting changes from the other JDK trains to JDK7..."

Charles Ditzel writes on the JavaLobby site What's Wrong With JavaFX and What Needs Fixing?: "With the recent spate of Rich Internet Application frameworks - such as Flex, Silverlight and more recently JavaFX (script) - it is clear that there is a lot of confusion over using a Java-based RIA framework such as JavaFX or using a Rich Internet Platform based on Java such as the Eclipse RCP or NetBeans Platform. Of course - there shouldn't be any confusion except that..."


In today's Weblogs, Jitendra Kotamraju writes about Bing and JAX-WS RI: "Using wsimport to consume bing's wsdl will run into conflicts: Too bad, wsimport doesn't work out of the box to consume bing's wsdl. It reports conflicts for SearchRequest and SearchResponse. You could use an unsupported(and undocumented!) wsimport switch -XautoNameResoultion that resolves the conflicts automatically. . "

Terrence Barr announces Just released: JavaFX Mobile 1.2 EA for Windows Mobile: "Ever since JavaFX Mobile was announced at Mobile World Congress in February developers were asking: When can we get our hands on real devices? Sure, the Mobile Emulator has been available for a while - but nothing beats the real thing...."

And Fabrizio Giudici continues his discussion on Mercurial: async operations are safer too: "I've previously told you that I'm going to blog about why I've switched to Mercurial and how I'm using it. A quick tip for today is to learn how the capability of working in async mode (that is, you first..."

In the Forums,gsong has an issue where a GlassFish Cluster doesn't replicate session: "I have been reading alot on how to set up glassfish cluter and I think I have did everything suggested on the instructions, but I'm still can't get thte
cluster session replication working. I have two server and created one instance on each server. I create a
cluster and deployed the clusterjsp.ear which get from the "$glassfish\samples\quickstart\clusterjsp' on the cluster, and it's seems that the session replication never working but it worked when i deploy the two instance both on one mache. test page of instance_gf1_1... "

Eduardo Peligri is Looking for volunteers for GF v3 FCS community event: "Please contact me if you want to help coordinate the community side of the GlassFish v3 FCS (GA/final) launch. My hope is that we can make it an informative, participative, world-wide event. Hopefully also fun! Please pass it on to other groups in the larger community..."

And mara_fenske provides a PhoneME Windows Mobile MIDP Wish List: "I am only going to list these items as "wish list" items because I am unable to do them myself because I have no legit C experience, but here are a few things that I would love to see added/fixed/reimplemented in the PhoneME builds for Windows Mobile MIDP (Feature and Advanced Dual Stack): * The latest builds of Advanced Dual Stack have serious virtual keyboard issues. It is a pain to try and pull up the virtual keyboard by using the menu each time you want to enter data into a text field in an application. Furthermore, on many devices the keyboard rarely opens even when you choose the Virtual Keyboard in the options..."


The current Spotlightis the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: JATAF panel discussion: "Excerpts of the panel discussion for the launch of JATAF (the Java Application Terminal Alignment Framework) at JavaOne." OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



The Java Tools Community has reached a milestone with the publication of the 200th issue of the Java Tools Community Newsletter...  

Juggy, leader of the java.net Java Finch Project, visited the java.net booth during this year's JavaOne, and spoke with (sometimes "at") Java Tools Community leaders Fabiane Nardon and Toni Epple ]]>Community Corner 2009 podcast.

Juggy opens the questioning by asking Fabiane to describe the Java Tools community. She noted that the community, which is focused on tools related to Java development, has almost 800 projects at present, including three Duke's Award winners. Toni pointed out that Sven Reimers, leader of the Java Tools SQE (Software Quality Environment) project, won a Duke's Award this year, for NetBeans-related work performed as part of his work at his company, ND Satcom. (You can hear Sven talk about both the Duke's Award and SQE in the Java Tools SQE Roundtable podcast.)

Another Duke's Award winner is the Mifos project, an open source toolkit that facilitates microfinance. The project was founded by the Grameen Foundation. See the Mifos home page for more information on how the project's software can be applied.

Last year, the Hudson project won a Duke. Hudson is an extensible continuous integration engine.

Juggy is quite an enthusiastic character. He finds a lot that is going on in the Java Tools Community "very cool!" But, he has little patience for wasted words. He asked Fabiane which Java Tools projects she really likes, and her answer was Hudson, which she uses regularly. When he asked Toni which Java Tools project he likes, and Toni's first response was Hudson, Juggy immediately cut him off: "That one Fabiane already said! Say another one!" To which Toni responded that he likes a lot of the NetBeans plugins (and was allowed by Juggy to continue talking).

About a third into the podcast, a new visitor, Jack Adams, showed up. He had been working previously and wasn't able to make the start of the conversation between Fabiane, Toni, and Juggy. Jack's focus of interest is the Mobile and Embedded realm. Poor Jack had lost his arm, somewhere around the time of JavaOne, the result of too much fast programming. Therefore, he was unable to accept an invitation to help write the Java Tools Newsletter. Perhaps he's gotten his arm back by now...

To be fair and provide full disclosure, I must admit that I know something about Juggy that he himself may not know: he's actually an alter-ego of Bruno Souza. I believe Jack Adams has a similar relationship with Roger Brinkley...

It was an intersting 27 minutes of Java Tools related discussion. If you'd like to hear the full conversation, listen to the Juggy and the Java Tools Team podcast.


In Java Today, In NetBeans IDE 6.7.1 with JavaFX Now Available for Download!, The java.net NetBeans Community announces NetBeans IDE 6.7.1 with JavaFX Now Available for Download!: "The NetBeans Team is pleased to announce the release of NetBeans IDE 6.7.1, which supports the latest JavaFX SDK. Download NetBeans 6.7.1 (A JavaFX-only download bundle is also available.) NetBeans IDE 6.7.1 is an update to NetBeans IDE 6.7 and includes the following changes: Support for JavaFX 1.2..."

Peligri came across something interesting and invites us to Check this Virtual Tour of Sun's DataCenter - And GlassFish v3 Launch?: "I've only used Second Life a couple of times and in either time I didn't spend enough time to have a good feel for the experience - I'll confess I'm not a gamer, unless you count the occasional GT5 and Rock Band - but Mary pointed me to a recent event that seemed compelling..."

Rick Palkovic wrote an interesting JavaOne-related article titled 'Design Patterns' for Dynamic Languages on the JVM Machine: 'Neal Ford is a popular presenter at computer science conferences, and he showed why at the 2009 JavaOne conference. His session, "Design Patterns" for Dynamic Languages on the JVM (TS-4961), was largely a critique of the book Design Patterns by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, and John Vlissides (collectively known as the "Gang of Four")...'


In today's Weblogs, Kohsuke Kawaguchi writes about Why can't we get rid of JNLP @codebase?: 'The real reason why JNLP file needs to know its own URL. "Java Web Start demands that the JNLP file contains the codebase attribute on the root tag, but this is really problematic. The reason this is problematic is mainly because of the difficulty for a web application to know its own URL..."'

Marina Sum writes about New Features in OpenDS 2.0: "Read their highlights, complete with configuration steps and other nuances, thanks to Ludo Poitou. "OpenDS community manager and architect Ludo Poitou has posted a series that highlights the new features in OpenDS 2.0, which he announced on July 17...""

And John Catherino writes about I claim King of the Mountain! ;-): "Hear ye, hear ye: I forthwith throw down the gauntlet, to all Java distributed computing wizards out there: Who is up for a good tourney? Be the network truly the computer? ;-)"


In the Forums, bentomasini asks about Capturing protocol timing information: "Hi, I am interested in capturing the duration of the actual HTTP call made by a JAX-WS client. I understand that content is streamed back, so this may not entirely straightforward. The goal is to, as closely as possible, determine how long the server on the other end spent processing the request, along with network transmission and latency. Parsing time and other client processing should be excluded from this timing as much as possible. Does the JAX-WS RI have any facility to support this? ..."

Paul Sterk asks about Heads Up: GlassFish Wiki Migration: "All, I am in the process of migrating the GlassFish, Open ESB, Metro and Update Center wikis (including all data and history) to an HA environment with updated hardware. The staging server and new wikis are here: http://glassfishwiki1.foundry.sun.com/, http://glassfishwiki1.foundry.sun.com/open-esb, http://glassfishwiki1.foundry.sun.com/metro/, http://glassfishwiki1.foundry.sun.com/updatecenter/. Please take a few minutes to review the wikis and report back to me on any issues..."

And growse asks about Glassfish, JSPs and Java classes. How static is static?: "I've been playing with Glassfish recently and getting to know Java a bit better. I've been building a fairly simple website and had some questions. So, my model is this: I've got some JSPs (tier 1, effectively). These then call methods within classes in various classes / packages (tier 2). The database conneciton (tier 3) is created in the glassfish admin console as a JDBC resource - when one of the methods needs to access the db, it calls this..."


The current Spotlight is the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


-->


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

Juggy, leader of the java.net Java Finch Project, visited the java.net booth during this year's JavaOne, and spoke with (sometimes "at") Java Tools Community leaders Fabiane Nardon and Toni Epple...

I don't spend much time watching videos on the web. However, "A Brief History of Java and JDBC", which Jonathan Bruce pointed out a few days ago, is an interesting and entertaining way to spend four minutes and thirteen seconds of your time.

The video starts with the beginning of Java in 1991. Then, it was named "Oak." Duke was apparently around from very near the beginning. And, well, the video proceeds from there to outline the history of Java, with some focus on JDBC in particular.

The video ties events in the history of Java and JDBC with various entertainment events, such as the appearance of movies and the beginning or end of long-running television series. The evolution of cell phones and digital cameras are also used as reference points for giving us a sense of when and how long ago the various events in Java's history occured.

The video, which is a pretty slick production, is the creation of Jesse Davis (jldavis007). Jesse had this to say about the video when he posted it:

For some internal training I wanted to highlight the importance of Java on the technology industry and the world, so I decided to do this brief history of Java and JDBC movie. My first Google search turned up a history timeline from Sun Microsystems (http://www.java.com/en/javahistory/) and so that was used as the basis for the movie. Java Junkies Enjoy!

Here's the actual timeline Jesse is referring to. The timeline itself includes a few of the entertainment references Jesse included in his video, but he added others as well.

There's one little scene in the video that I disagree with, or don't understand: the statement that Apple at some point "eclipsed" Sun. To me, they are far too different to be seen as direct competitors. And, with respect to Java itself, I don't think anyone would consider Apple to have eclipsed Sun...

Regardless, "A Brief History of Java and JDBC" is entertaining and informative. Thanks to Jesse Davis for creating and posting the video, and thanks to Jonathan Bruce for noticing it and pointing us to it.


In Java Today, In Hudson as Fabric for Distributed Computation, Peligri summarizes some important Hudson advances in Hudson as Fabric for Distributed Computation: "Kohsuke has been expanding the capabilities of Hudson over the last few months to make it easier to manage and provision more machines (Swarm of Machines, EC2 Plugin, PXE Plugin) and then do interesting things on it (Selenium Grid, Hadoop Cluster)..."

The java.net Mobile & Embedded Community noticed an interesting article by Geertjan Wielenga on the JavaLobby site, JavaLobby Report on Latin America's Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days: 'Three years ago Roger Brinkley (Mobile & Embedded Community Leader) and Terrence Barr (Senior Technologist and Community Ambassador) realized that there wasn't really a conference focused on mobile and embedded Java topics. Though there were several Java conferences, they never provided a space where details relating to mobile and embedded devices could be discussed. So Roger and Terrence asked a few people: "What if we were to put together a conference specifically geared towards mobile and embedded Java topics?" '...

William Louth has come up with some interesting methods for Visualizing Sequential & Hierarchical Execution Aspects of Metered Software: "Last week I managed to get back working on cool and innovative (hopefully you will agree) visualization work that I had designed (lots of sketches scattered around my office) a long time back but never managed to get the push to actually realize them within the product until today when we released a first in a series of visualization updates I am actively working on that will raise the bar..."


In today's Weblogs, Fabrizio Giudici has Switched to Mercurial: "During this month I've written just a few new code, focusing instead on the conversion of my projects from Subversion to Mercurial (and also converting almost everything from Ant to Maven, and working on a much improved build workflow with..."

Jonathan Bruce points out A Brief History of Java and JDBC: "It's been quite some time since I've posted here, but this deserves a mention. More importantly, this... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAy9mgEYb6o"

And Carol McDonald writes about JSF 2.0, JPA, GlassFish and MySQL: "This Pet Catalog app explains a web application that uses JSF 2.0, JPA, GlassFish and MySQL."


In the Forums,elwood33 has an issue involving AWT resource cleanup - conflict with external app: "Hi all, I have a very simple java class that displays a black screen using a frame and window and then setting fullscreen with the setFullScreenWindow exclusive API on the graphicsdevice. After this I'm calling a runtime.exec on an external 3rd party process (C++ full screen output app) that seems to require fullscreen mode as well, this process hangs until the java application has exited. The external program loads correctly if no frame/window or getDefaultScreenDevice() commands are called in java. I've tried setting the fullscreenWindow mode to null and disposing of the frame and window and setting them to null but only a java program exit releases the required resource and lets the external app load..."

George Turner has a situation with Resource injection not working when url-pattern is not default: "I am trying to find a real answer to a real problem, preferably an answer that does not include "use the defaults". I am using the latest releases of Glassfish (2.1) and Metro (2.0 ea). I am deploying a web service developed from a WSDL. I have arranged the @WebService annotations and the attributes in the endpoint element of the sun-jaxws.xml in multiple ways, and I cannot find any combination that will work that will deploy the service to listen ONLY at the address specified by the url-pattern attribute. If I access the service at the pattern specified, the call will work BUT any variable initialized by resource injection will be null. If I access the service at the default pattern, the variable are initialized correctly..."

And vladfi2 asks How to represent a Multiset as a List: "I am designing a multiset implementation that i would like to work with JAXB. Internally, the multiset uses a map to keep track of each element's count-this is the most efficient way (that i know of). However, I would like it to be represented in XML as a list, with possible repeats (since it is a multiset)-this is more human readable and editable..."


The current Spotlightis the Alice Team Roundtable. Sonya Barry moderates a discussion with the Alice Team in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne: "Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



I don't spend much time watching videos on the web. However, "A Brief History of Java and JDBC", which Jonathan Bruce pointed out a few days ago, is an interesting and entertaining way to spend four minutes...  

The results of this past week's java.net pollwere both not surprising and highly surprising to me. I expected to find that most developers use open source tools in their daily work, but I did not expect the prevalence of open source to be as comple ]]>

A total of 440 votes were cast. Here's the actual question, and the results:

Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?

  • 25.2% (111 votes) - OSS is integrated into the products I work on
  • 14.3% (63 votes) - I use OSS developer tools
  • 0.9% (4 votes) - I use OSS office tools
  • 0.0% (0 votes) - I use other OSS
  • 56.5% (249 votes) - Multiple of the above
  • 2.7% (12 votes) - No, I don't use OSS in my daily work
  • 0.2% (1 vote) - Other

What didn't surprise me is that a lot of developers use open source tools. What did surprise me was that less than 3% of people said they don't use open source software tools in their daily work. I thought that surely there are lots of companies that require developers to use commercial tools for everything. The tally in this poll suggests that that's not the case. (Of course, this is not a scientific poll.)

So, 97% of people are using open source software in their daily work, with the majority using multiple types of OSS. A tiny fraction uses only OSS office tools. And about 1/7th use open source developer tools, but no other open source software in their daily work. Everyone who uses open source tools at work uses either OSS developer tools or OSS office tools, or OSS is integrated into the products they work on (there were 0 votes for "I use other OSS").

I had a hard time framing the first response, "OSS is integrated into the products I work on." I didn't want Java itself to be included in that category, but it's possible that that wasn't clear. I mean, Java itself is open source. I was hoping people would view that response as meaning open source packages are integrated into the products they work on. Ah, yes! After the poll is closed I think of a better way to frame the response. Convenient!

Anyway -- that 97% of developers are using open source in their daily work speaks volumes about the success of open source. Who (among those old enough to remember software development in, say, the 1980s) would ever have thought free software developed significantly through unpaid contributions of time and effort by developers would come to fully saturate the professional software engineering work environment?

New poll: JDK 7

The new poll asks "What's your view of the emerging JDK 7?" Think it's great? OK? Typical? Useless? Cast your vote! Voting will remain open through next Thursday.


In Java Today, Sahoo announces the OSGi Declarative Service bundle in GlassFish: "Starting with build #56, GlassFish v3 now comes pre-installed with Apache Felix Service Component Runtime, which is an implementation of OSGi Declarative Service Specification. This bundle is located in modules/ directory and is started automatically when server starts. "

Ed Ort has written New JDK 7 Feature: Support for Dynamically Typed Languages in the Java Virtual Machine: "This article describes a new feature provided in JDK 7: support for dynamically typed languages in the Java virtual machine (JVM). This feature, which implements JSR 292: Supporting Dynamically Typed Languages on the Java Platform, is the logical follow-on to JSR 223: Scripting for the Java Platform. Support for JSR 223 was provided as part of Java SE 6 and implemented in JDK 6..."

And Jean-Francois Arcand announces Atmosphere 0.3 Released: "Atmosphere 0.3 released with support for Scala, Clustering, Injections, Grails Support, Cometd/Bayeux Protocol, many performance improvements, and many new extension points!! ..."d otherwise, add an annotation to a property and hop it's validated..."


In today's Weblogs, Varun Nischal writes about Wiki to XML using Ant: "I have written my first-ever Ant task that could simplify the task of converting WikiCreole Markup to XML format. This conversion was made possible due to the efforts of Martin Junghans and Dirk Riehle. Refer blog for more details.."

Kumar Jayanti describes MTOM threshold for Secure WebServices: "Setting MTOM threshold for Secure WebServices"

And Fabrizio Giudici asks Do you complain Sun is not open enough? Have a look to NetDEV for NetBeans: "I seldom post just to link to others' posts without further comments, but this is a very important step forward for the NetBeans Community. Have a look at Toni's post for learning about NetDEV."


In the Forums, elaltaico wonders how to make color stable on lwuit: "Hello. I have several buttons at my forms. These colors are red. When I click red button it turns to white color then it can go to next page successfully. It works very well but I do not want my button to change its colour to white when I clicked it. I used Resource Editor to give colors to my buttons, labels, textfilds. Could you please tell me a way not to chaneg my button's color when someone clicks it? ..."

judys has an issue involving JSF2: MethodExpression attribute doesn't get set: "I'm converting a couple of components and their demo programs from 1.2 to 2.0. The components have an attribute whose value is a MethodExpression: In JSF2 I'm finding that the value gets set as a ValueExpression in the attributes map rather than setting the component's configuration property as a MethodExpression. Workarounds would be to extract the String value from the ValueExpression, or define a new attribute that takes a String value "handler.configure" (as I did) and build a MethodExpression from it. But..."

And pkotla asks about How to refresh the cache using glashfish server: "Hi Guys, I have an application with two layers, front end – JSF and business layer is in JCAPS (web services). My front end application is deployed on Glassfish server. My problem is that I have some of the master data stored in cache at application scope which I want to refresh periodically. This can be done programmatically but it has a few performance drawbacks given in the current scenario. Also when doing it programmatically it would require a user action to trigger the refreshing event. Can this be done in some other way..."


The current Spotlight is Chris Hegarty's "Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java": "Providing support for Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java has been approved as one of the JDK 7 features. The work of defining the API and reference implementation was done through the sctp openjdk project. This work was integrated into JDK 7 Milestone 3 and is available in all future promotions..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?". Today (Thursday) is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


-->


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

The results of this past week's java.net poll were both not surprising and highly surprising to me...

The java.net Mobile and Embedded Community pointed out an interesting new article by Bruce Hopkins, Faster Data Transfer With Bluetooth and Contactless Communication. Bruce is the author of Bluetooth for Java. The article was published on the Sun Developer Network.

Bruce starts out with some basic facts about data transfer speed:

Bluetooth technology allows two devices near each other to communicate at a maximum speed of 3 Mb per second. In the grand scheme of wireless communication, Bluetooth is roughly two times faster than the data throughput of a 3G wireless phone but still 10 to 20 times slower than today's Wi-Fi speeds.

He then talks about how difficult and time consuming it is for Bluetooth devices to discover one another, even when they are right next to each other:

due to the inherent nature of most wireless communication protocols, Bluetooth devices need to discover other Bluetooth devices, even if both devices are right next to each other... To find the available services on a remote Bluetooth device, you also need to search for a service... But device discovery and service searching are extremely time-consuming and frustrating to use when you're trying to communicate with a device that's right in front of you.

Is there a solution? That's the point of Bruce's article. In the main body of the article, Bruce introduces Near-Field Communication (NFC) and JSR 257: Contactless Communication API. Taken together, these enable Bluetooth devices to completely bypass the standard device-discovery and service search processes, speeding up the process of finding and connecting with nearby Bluetooth services immensely.

NFC is a radio communication standard that enables wireless data transfer between two devices at a very short distance -- less than 10 centimeters. NFC devices include a certain class ofradio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and contactless smart cards. NFC devices operate within the 13.56 MHz frequency range, and they support extremely low data rates -- a maximum of 0.42 Mb per second.

So, the communication speed is very slow, yet NFC is still worthwhile? Well, yes -- because the setup time for NFC is virtually nil. So, in fact, your connection with the nearby device occurs much sooner than with the traditional network based device discovery process.

JSR 257, the Contactless Communication API, is the Java ME API that allows mobile phones to communicate with a variety of devices within proximity.
figure1_sml.png 

Bruce demonstrates the speed difference between basic Bluetooth and Bluetooth with NFC through a Java application he created that applies the NFC classes in JSR 257. Here are the results:

In my testing, the total time to transfer a 50k file using standard Bluetooth device discovery and service searching is between 40 seconds, which is OK, and 90 seconds, which is terrible.

But the use of NFC technology reduced the total transfer time to 11 seconds -- that's roughly a 75 percent to 90 percent performance increase.

Read Bruce's article for all the details.


In Java Today, the java.net Mobile and Embedded Community points out a new article on the Sun Developer Network, Faster Data Transfer With Bluetooth and Contactless Communication, by Bruce Hopkins: "Learn how Bluetooth applications can bypass the device discovery and service searching by using Near-Field Communication (NFC) technology and JSR 257 (Contactless Communication API)."

Peligri announces the upcoming GlassFish Porfolio Webinar in Chinese - Aug 6th, 2009: "In two weeks (Thu, August 6th, 2009, 10-11am) we will host our first Webinar in Chinese. Judy(Ms FishCAT) will present; she is a native speaker and has presented on GlassFish in multiple occasions, including online and in Person.

Emmanuel Bernard wrote about the Road to Final: Bean Validation JSR 303 and Hibernate Validator 4: "JSR 303 Bean Validation and Hibernate Validator 4 (the reference implementation) are now in their last draft before final. Bean Validation standardizes constraint declaration, definition, validation and metadata for the Java platform. Said otherwise, add an annotation to a property and hop it's validated..."


In today's Weblogs, Cay Horstmann says Say Sayonara to sPAL!: "When I teach my JSF crash course to my software engineering students, everyone nods, works through the lab, and I don't hear any JSF issues from them for a couple of weeks. Then they run into links with parameters and the need for the dreaded sPAL. Not anymore! JSF2 supports parameters in action methods, which let you express your intent without contortions. Here is how."

Felipe Gaucho had some fun recently: RSJUG BBQ: "During my holiday in Porto Alegre I met the RSJUG leaders during a friendly BBQ. The agenda included Java in the local market, PUJ and - of course - the best meat you can find in Brazil."

And Fabrizio Giudici writes about Installing Mercurial with no root privileges: "After more than one year of experience with Mercurial (because NetBeans repository moved to hg time ago), I feel good with it and I've decided to switch most of my projects from Subversion to it. I'll talk in another post..."


In the Forums,dmaroto83 finds that CellCache doesn`t work with standalone client: "Hi, I`m running a standalone client in Wonderland 0.5 to do some tasks (based on the connectionsample module programmed by Jonathan Kaplan), and I`ve found that CellCache doesn`t work with these type of clients. When I try to get the references to cells placed in world doing a "session.getCellCache().getCell(cellID)", I always obtain a null reference, even when the cellID corresponds to a cell that I`ve just created and inserted in the world. How can I get the references to cells in world from this standalone client? Thanks."

jferrandi asks for information on The way to manually request the secured token: "Hi all, I've got a Client/Webservice/STS application, using glassfish v2.1, switching metro 1.5 and 2.0EA( cause of integrated fixes in 2.0EA). I ask myself what the steps are (on each side, client, STS ...) to manually ask a token to the STS. I've already seen all the posts of user Vietda, but it doesn't seem clear to me. To my mind, the steps are : 1 - Manually ask for the token from the client to the STS, in a Servlet for example. (using IssuedTokenManager); 2 - Configure the STS to provide this token. (If i'll already configure the STS, there's nothing to change); 3 - Once the client get the token, include it in the SOAP message, for consuming the targeted web service. To my mind this step is achieve in a callback handler... "

And cinacio is getting a NullPointerException in getDeployedWebInfo(ApplicationHandlers.java:698): "Ladies and Gentlemen, While display the Web Applications list after adding my third of ten Web Applications to the Web Admin Tool for GlassFish v2.1 I received a NullPointerException in: getDeployedWebInfo(ApplicationHandlers.java:698). The add appeared to have worked based on the results using the CLI. I continued to add the other Web Applications to the server without problems using the CLI. Any ideas on restoring the Web Interface would be helpful..."


The current Spotlightis Chris Hegarty's "Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java": "Providing support for Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java has been approved as one of the JDK 7 features. The work of defining the API and reference implementation was done through thesctp openjdk project. This work was integrated into JDK 7 Milestone 3 and is available in all future promotions..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?". Today (Thursday) is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



The java.net Mobile and Embedded Community pointed out an interesting new article by Bruce Hopkins, "Faster Data Transfer With Bluetooth and Contactless Communication"...  

At JavaOne, in the java.net booth, Jim Wright interviewed Pavel Suk (Director of the Prague Engineering Center) and Jakub Podlesak (head of the Prague JUG) in a java.net Community Corner podcast. Pavel and Jakub are also both members of the Open Source User Group (OSUG) in Prague.

Jim starts out by noting that Prague is a beautiful city, wondering why Pavel and Jakub left there to visit San Francisco. The response was "have you been to Prague?" When Jim said he hadn't, the Czechs expressed amazement: "How can that happen!?"

Jim asked about how Java development got started in Prague. The answer was that, quite a long time ago, several students at one of the oldest universities in Europe, in Prague, were working on diverse concepts that eventually emerged as aspects of JavaEE. The team decided they needed an IDE, and called their IDE work "NetBeans." In 1999, they approached Sun, because Sun was seeking an IDE. Sun decided to acquire this "NetBeans" project team!

The Prague developer community has grown over the years, contributing to OpenSolaris and many other open source projects. In addition, user groups are quite active in the Czech Republic. The Prague JUG is a focal point for Java developers, and for companies that are seeking Java developers. A typical Prague JUG meeting draws about 100 attendees.

So, what draws people to the Prague JUG meetings? Well, there's the pizza and beer... but, actually, the JUG brings in a lot of speakers who talk about the latest cool technologies, which the developers clearly want to hear about. To fully accomodate the Czech developer community, the JUG moves its meetings around the republic, rather than always requiring members to travel to Prague for the meetings.

I really enjoyed listening to this podcast. It's exciting to hear about, and feel, the energy that is happening in places in the world I know little about. At the end of the podcast, it's agreed that we all should take the time to make a visit to Prague. Sounds like a good idea to me! So, when's the next Prague JUG meeting??

Visit the java.net Community Corner podcasts page to listen to all the podcasts we recorded at this year's JavaOne (and at prior JavaOne's as well).


In Java Today, the JavaDesktop Community points out Writing PacMan in JavaFX, an interesting tutorial showing how to build a game in JavaFX. I wrote at length about Henry Zhang's JavaFX PacMan article series in my June 11 Editor's blog, PacMan in JavaFX. It looks like Henry has extended his article series since my post. Thanks to the JavaDesktop Communityfor pointing this out to us!

Danny Coward points out an emerging option for phone applications in Java ME: Bluetooth or NFC ?: "Most new feature phones now haveBluetooth, and so most support the Java APIs to allow Java (and JavaFX) applications to drive it. And as you can see in this survey of Java ME tools, all the major development tools for Java ME phones support the APIs too. You may also have noticed some rather naughty uses of it too."

Abel Avram presents lessons on RIA from Anthony Franco and Gerd Waloszek in his InfoQueue article "Good" Lessons on How To Fail a RIA Project: "In a presentation calledTen Ways to Ensure RIA Failure, Anthony Franco, president of EffectiveUI, gives 10 pieces of advice to those who want their RIA project to fail. Gerd Waloszek, SAP AG, wrote 18 Golden Rules for Bad User Interfaces..."


In today's Weblogs, Sonya Barry writes about Women's Voices - I don't hear them very often here.: "The first Community Leadership Summit was held last weekend in San Jose, California. I attended and become involved in a different kind of discussion about women in tech."

And Cay Horstmann writes about Add an XSD file to Eclipse and Eliminate Those Pesky XML Warnings: "If you work with Eclipse and JSF 2, you too may be annoyed at the little warning triangle that shows up next to all your faces-config.xml


In the Forums,kingdomheart asks How to make JComboBox flash (red color)?: "For example, the user select "cat" from the list of JComboBox, it then fire up an event to load some texts in some of the text boxes. When the user change the content of one of the boxes, the JComboBox (with the selected item is "cat") flash (red color maybe) to indicated that the content of "cat" has been change. That the user need to save. How can I do that? I have done something similar in C# using Window Form Validated and Validating, but somehow it is much harder in java. I been looking around but nothing come close to what I want. Thanks in advance."

danielrech asks Does 'SoftButton' support 'Selected' an 'Pressed' styles?: "I'm trying to configure the 'Selected' and 'Pressed' styles of the SoftButton component in the latest resource editor (LWUIT 1.2), but they don't show in the preview or in the actual MIDlet (e.g. SoftButton.bgColor = 0x0). So my question is: Does 'SoftButton' support 'Selected' an 'Pressed' styles?"

digitalsam007 is facing a problem with JPA - A Complex Relationship Scenario. Help!!!: "Hello friends, I am currently stuck in a complex scenario which I am not yet able to solve with JPA 1.0. The problem statement is as follows - The domain objects concerned in this scenario are User, Mentor, Topic. User U1 can be a Mentor M1 of other User U2 in a particular Topic T1. Again, the same user U1 can also be a Mentor M2 for another User U3 in a Topic T2. Also, User U2 can be a mentor M3 of a fourth User U4 for a Topic T3. As if this was not complex enough, now, User U2 can again be a Mentor M4 for User U1 and U3 in Topic T4. Can anyone help me in implementing this use case in JPA?"

a_schwarte has an issue where WSGEN digests stacktrace when starting in ANT build: "Hey guys, I have encountered another really annoying problem with wsgen. Assuming I have an error in my WebService class. Note: this problem is independent of the error: When I invoke WSGEN from my ANT build script, it digests (i.e. doesn't show) the stacktrace in the output. It just says "Error starting wsgen", which is obviously not very helpful. But when I run the same command from the command line I retrieve a perfectly fine stack trace. Is there any possibility to tell wsgen to print the stack trace, when invoking it from an ANT build script?..."

And this_is_mark asks about Clustering Glassfish across a wide-area network (WAN) ?: "Is clustering Glassfish server instances across a wide-area network (T3/DS-3 connections) a recommended and supported enterprise application environment? Have you successfully done so or know of such Glassfish deployments? We are using servlets, EJBs and JMS. If clustering across a WAN isn't supported or isn't a wise thing to do, why not and what issues will we encounter? I have a colleague that's proposed clustering across our VPN, and while open to new ideas I'm somewhat skeptical."


The current Spotlightis Chris Hegarty's "Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java": "Providing support for Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java has been approved as one of the JDK 7 features. The work of defining the API and reference implementation was done through thesctp openjdk project. This work was integrated into JDK 7 Milestone 3 and is available in all future promotions..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



At JavaOne, in the java.net booth, Jim Wright interviewed Pavel Suk (Director of the Prague Engineering Center) and Jakub Podlesak (head of the Prague JUG)...  

Development of the SailFin project, which provides high-availability and clustering capability for SIP servlets (JSR 289), is proceeding toward a scheduled October release for Version 2. Binod P G just posted a summary of the latest SailFin news in the Aquarium:

Diameter support in SailFin is progressing well. Venu has blogged about steps to use Sh api for updating user profile information in HSS (eg: Open IMS). In another post, he explains using onine charging in SailFin.

Geertjan Wielenga interviewed SailFin developers Vince Kraemer and Binod P G in March 2008 on the JavaLobby site in an article titled SailFin: When Java EE Met SIP. He starts out the article with an introduction to SIP:

SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) technology is behind many of today's popular services, such as VoIP, instant messaging, and web conferencing. Underpinning SIP is the SIP Servlet, initially defined in JSR-116 and, since then, updated in JSR-289. The latter defines a standard application programming model to mix SIP Servlets and Java EE components.

SailFin's unigue role is that it brings these capabilities to the GlassFishapplication server. The Version 2 software has just entered SCF (soft code freeze), and the SCF build is currently available for download. The current SailFin Version 2 development schedule calls for a hard code freeze on August 26, and final release on October 28.

So, what does Binod mean by "Diameter support"? He wrote about this in an April post:

The Diameter protocol (RFC 3588) is designed to provide an Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA) framework for applications.SailFin will be adding support for Diameter protocol by 2nd half of CY2009. Sh (Subscriber profile interface), Rf (Offline Charging interface), Ro (Online charging interface) will be available.

The RFC says that Diameter is "intended to work in both local Authentication, Authorization & Accounting and roaming situations." Naman Mehta wrote a fairly detailed Introduction to Diameter Protocol in March. It turns out that the name "Diameter" came about as a pun on RADIUS, the predecessor protocal. RADIUS stands for Remote Authentication Dial In User Service. As Naman notes, " diameter is twice the radius."

Diameter protocol came as a result of developments to eliminate limitations with the radius gateway. It serves similar purpose in AAA applications however, advanced processes and operations were added to the protocol to make it reliable. This included the addition of attribute value pairs (AVPs) and error notification which was not present on older protocols. Diameter is not directly backwards compatible, but provides an upgrade path for RADIUS.

Venu Gopal summarized the Diameter support that will be included in SailFin in a recent blog post:

Highlights of Diameter support in Sailfin

  • 1.Easy to use API , interfaces provided for AVP's defined in 3GPP specs and RFC's
  • 2.Easy to query additional AVP's in a Grouped AVP.
  • 3.Easy to add new AVP support using dictionary or annotations.
  • 4.Ability to send messages in a synchronous or asynchronous manner(Listener support to receive asynchronous responses)
  • 5.Interfaces defined to build messages as per 3GPP specifications.
  • 6.Easy to build custom messages as shown in the code snippet.

For more information on SailFin, visit the project's home page on java.net


In Java Today, Sonya Barry moderates the Alice Team Roundtable discussion in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne. 'Alice is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Created at Carnegie Mellon University, Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming. Alice 3, currently under development, enables a transition from Alice to Java, allowing students to "open the hood" and work with the Java code for 3D animation programs.'

java.net's Gary Thompson hosts the James Liu and OpenSolaris Team Roundtable in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne.

In SailFin Diameter Support - Online Charging, Sh API., Binod PG writes "Diameter support in SailFin is progressing well. Venu has blogged about steps to use Sh api for updating user profile information in HSS (eg: Open IMS). In another post, he explains using onine charging in SailFin..."


In today's Weblogs, Elie Levy writes about Managing 800,000+ Lines of Code: "Imagine you get to an organization that has several applications accounting for more than 800,000 lines of code. There are defects everywhere, releases after releases, lots of developers cranking code, after every release more defects... how do you stop the spiral?"

And Fabrizio Giudici has an idea if you need Better properties in BetterBeansBinding? Put it on the whiteboard!: "When I created the BetterBeansBinding project, I spent a considerable amount of time for setting up a complete software factory with Continuous Integration (a thing that I've reasonabily completed only a few days ago, and now only misses a Maven..."


In the Forums,alex_boyko is working with a Japanese String with Tahoma on BufferedImage: "Hi all, I'd like to paint a Japanese string with Tahoma font on a BufferedImage. The string is displayed with SWT. When I export the contents of SWT canvas to AWT BufferedImage and paint SWT constructs on AWT Graphics 2D (the result of BufferedImage#createGraphics()) the japanese string becomes a string of squares. Is there any way to fix that? I've read somewhere that FontUIResource instaed of java.awt.Font may help, but it didn't..."

wakaoz has an issue involving Bypass firewall/NAT: "Hi all, I am new here ... I am facing firewall/NAT problem. I want to ask if it is good for me to use JXTA ONLY for this purpose? If so, where should I start to look into? Any suggestions will be highly appreciated!"

vinsek found that JAXWS SecurityTubeAppender removed SOAP Body attributes: "Hi, I am signing the whole SOAP Body and adding a new xml:id attribute for signed element reference. I am appending the Signature element in the SOAP using SOAPHandler. However the JAXWS tool kit removes the outgoing SOAP Body attributes [xml:id] while passing the packet in the SecurityTubeAppender. Metro tool kit treats SOAP body and header as mutable objects. Which means, If I have the webservice-rt.jar in my client class path or server's class path, the SOAP message will be altered on the way..."

And this_is_mark asks about Clustering Glassfish across a wide-area network (WAN) ?: "Is clustering Glassfish server instances across a wide-area network (T3/DS-3 connections) a recommended and supported enterprise application environment? Have you successfully done so or know of such Glassfish deployments? We are using servlets, EJBs and JMS. If clustering across a WAN isn't supported or isn't a wise thing to do, why not and what issues will we encounter? I have a colleague that's proposed clustering across our VPN, and while open to new ideas I'm somewhat skeptical."


The current Spotlightis Chris Hegarty's "Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java": "Providing support for Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP) in Java has been approved as one of the JDK 7 features. The work of defining the API and reference implementation was done through thesctp openjdk project. This work was integrated into JDK 7 Milestone 3 and is available in all future promotions..."


This week's java.net Poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include an article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Development of the SailFin project, which provides high-availability and clustering capability for SIP servlets (JSR 289), is proceeding toward a scheduled October release for Version 2...  

The voting in this past week's java.net poll indicates that the NetBeans user community (our sampling of it, anyway) considers native Maven support to be the the most significant new feature in the new NetBeans Version 6.7 release. A total of 257 votes were cast. Here's the actually poll question and the responses:

What's the most significant new feature in NetBeans 6.7?

  • 5.4% (14 votes) - Integration with Project Kenai
  • 30.7% (79 votes) - Native Maven support
  • 4.2% (11 votes) - Hudson integration
  • 12.0% (31 votes) - Language support enhancements
  • 5.4% (14 votes) - GlassFish integration
  • 7.0% (18 votes) - Other
  • 35.0% (90 votes) - I don't use NetBeans

So, of the 65% of votes that expressed an opinion on what the most significant new feature in NetBeans 6.7 is, 79 out of the 167 votes (47.3%) were cast for native Maven support. Looking at just the 167 votes that expressed a view about what new feature is most significant in NetBeans 6.7, the percentages are:

  • 47.3% - Native Maven support
  • 18.6% - Language support enhancements
  • 8.4% - Integration with Project Kenai
  • 8.4% - GlassFish integration
  • 6.6% - Hudson Integration
  • 10.8% - Other

There were seven comments posted. In a midst of a somewhat heated discussion of the NetBeans stability, and the risks and benefits of upgrading an IDE version in the middle of a project,carcassi noted:

One of the other features NB 6.7 has is that it more or less automatically disables what you are not using... That alone was why I upgraded: the startup time was cut in half for me. It also seems to be more clever in the initial scanning of the projects, which in NB 6.5 essentially froze my IDE for a few minutes before I could actually do anything relevant...

Meanwhile, vprise said "All of the mentioned features aren't useful for me personally. So far I'm staying with 6.5."

trcorbin expressed significant frustration with the current NetBeans support for Groovy.

And swpalmer noted:

JavaFX support would be nice. The fact that it is missing is a significant "feature".


 

New poll: use of open source software tools

This week's new java.net poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?"


In Java Today, we're featuring Juggy and the Java Tools Team. In this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at JavaOne 2009, Java Tools Community Leaders Toni Epple and Fabian Nardon speak with Juggy (Bruno Souza) in a wide ranging "conversation" (if you can call it that - Juggy tends to take over, wherever he is).

Jim Driscoll announces JSF 2 Beta 2 released: "The Mojarra team are proud to announce the release of our Beta 2 version of Mojarra 2.0, implementing the PFD version of the JavaServer Faces 2.0 spec. You can find it on our downloads page, as well as in the GlassFish Update Center. And as always, be sure to check the release notes for more information..."

And Terrence Barr announces LWUIT keeps crankin': Version 1.2 released: "The LWUIT project (Lightweight UI Toolkit) just keeps crankin' ... Among many other recent developments the LWUIT team yesterday released version 1.2. The list of improvements is too long to list here - check out the LWUIT blog..."


In today's Weblogs, Arun Gupta posted Are you using GlassFish ? - Let us know!: "Are you using GlassFish for development, deployment/production, testing, teaching or in other interesting ways ? Help us fill out this short survey so we understand you better. The survey will not take more than 5-10 minutes of your time. blogs.sun.com/stories has a partial..."

Kohsuke Kawaguchi announces Distributed Groovy computation across a Hudson cluster: "I released the Hudson distributed fork plugin today, which lets you use Groovy for coordinating computation across multiple JVMs in a cluster, all connected to your shell on your laptop."

And Amy Fowler talks about a Good Book, Great Authors: "Taking a moment to recommend a great JavaFX reference: Even before I started working on the JavaFX project, there were a handful of very brave outside individuals who have dedicated tremendous energy to tracking our bleeding edge. I've had the pleasure of working with two of them in particular, Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver..."


In the Forums,mckaym is seeing More interface and JAXB shenanagins: "Hey everyone, I'm having problems deploying my webservice that extensively uses interfaces. I've been trying method 1 listed here (https://jaxb.dev.java.net/guide/Mapping_interfaces.html) and I have not found any success. I was able to write XmlJavaTypeAdapter that uses reflection to make wild stabbing guesses at what the object is supposed to be based of a static list of known implementations.... but it isn't a proper solution I'm at the end of a project and all I have to do is deploy the thing. I've tested all of my code with test cases and it all works fine. I just need this silly thing to deploy!..."

jules_ asks for Help with phoneME: "Hello all, I am trying to use phoneME on the THC Diamond as I am having issues with LWUIT on my app at the moment and a few people have sugestd using phoneME. However, when I try and run phone ME on the device it opens and then closes immediately and doesnt run the jar file. Im using the feaute version of phoneME and am trying to run the runmidlet jar file in the phoneME/MIDP/bin/arm folder. I would really appreciate any advice as this is holding me up a great deal..."

And gransi asks about JXTreeTable Sorting?: "Hello, I am a newbie to swingx. I need a sorting function in the JXTreeTable by clicking on the tableheader. I found some examples in the internet, but they will not work with swingx 1.0 and Java 6. Can you explain me, how I get a sorting function in JXTreeTable..."


The current Spotlightis "Podcast: Global Software Engineering Class Teaches FOSS Development Techniques": "Educator Dragutin Petkovic talks with java.net's Gary Thompson in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast recorded at JavaOne, presenting a synopsis of a Global Software Engineering class. The class is designed based on Dragutin's years of experience of teaching jointly at San Francisco State University (SFSU), the University of Applied Sciences, Fulda University, Germany, and recently with Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The class uses numerous Free and Open Source Software tools and teaches FOSS development techniques."


The new java.net Poll asks "Do you use open source software (OSS) tools in your daily work?". Next Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include a new article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



The voting in this past week's java.net poll indicates that the NetBeans user community (our sampling of it, anyway) considers Native Maven Support to be the the most significant new feature in the new NetBeans Version 6.7 release...  

The very last podcast interview I did at this year's JavaOne was one of the best: my talk with Adam Bien on JavaEE and rethinking best practices. I am primarily a server-side, data center guy, in my software engineering experience. I've been around a while, and have an historical perspective on this. Hence, it was incredibly interesting for me as Adam told me about some surprising (to me) new developments in the enterprise software engineering realm.

Adam's presentation occupied 33 minutes (making it among the longest of our Community Corner 2009 podcasts), but it was definitely time well spent for me. Be sure to download Adam's slides (PDF) so you can follow along as you listen to the podcast.

Adam starts out by addressing the assumptions people have regarding EJBs, for example, that they are heavyweight. This is actually is not true, if you really understand EJBs. They actually have a minimal implementation that is very compact and fast. The full capabilities are extensive, but EJBs can be implemented in concise manner that is indeed highly efficient.

Are EJB applications portable? Extensible? Many think not. But Adam shows that in fact these ideas are illusory, especially when it comes to EJB 3.

What about performance? Adam found a difference of only 3% between a well-designed EJB and an equivalent POJO in his testing. EJBs are actually lightweight in their minimal implementation. But, what they give you is free added capabilities that you don't have to develop and implement on your own - which you'd have to do if you were working on your own trying to extend a legacy POJO into the enterprise realm.

I found Adam's discussion of the conception that "EJBs are too complex" really interesting. I had suggested that the perception of complexity was one reason why developers avoid EJBs. Adam quickly distinguished "essential complexity" and "accidental complexity." Essential complexity is, for example, when you're working with distributed systems. You have to think about things like caching, synchronization. You can't have a genuinely working distributed system that doesn't fully solve these issues. So - do you want to develop your own infrastructure to solve these problems? Well, EJBs do it for you, for free.

What's the simplest possible EJB? One that implements a single POJO. So, why is this valuable? Because implementing the POJO within an EJB instantly gains you all the enterprise-level capabililties that EJBs provide, without any additional work on your part. You just build a jar and deploy it, and suddenly your POJO is available at the enterprise level.

Adam has found that often the perceived complexity of JavaEE and EJBs is really the result of design decisions made by software architects. If the design is overly complex, then the developed EJBs will necessarily be complex. EJBs are indeed powerful. But that potential can sometimes induce a desire to use features of EJBs that aren't really necessary in the specific application at hand -- resulting in unneeded complexity.

I really enjoyed the discussion we got into near the end of the podcast regarding the relationship between stateful components and today's new rich internet clients (RIAs). So-called "fat clients" were in vogue perhaps 10 years ago. Then, suddenly, thin clients (with stateless server-side interactions) were absolutelyrequired. Now, with RIA, we're shifting back to the concept that used to be called "fat clients." Well, EJBs happen to be ideal for addressing this need. Adam tells us how, in the latter minutes of our conversation.

I loved it when, in response to one of my statements about the history of stateful and stateless objects, Adam said:

"In my eyes, everything repeats in 10 years. If you wait long enough, in the next cycle, exactly what you did 10 years before, you get over."

That seems so true to me, thinking about the evolution of client-server applications, the advent of web applications, and today's new RIA focus. We just give it a new name, and everyone thinks it's something that's never been seen before. We agreed that software engineering progresses in a spiral pattern.

Adam has a wonderful knowledge of the history of JavaEE and EJBs. If you're an enterprise Java developer, or if you work in other areas buts you're interested in the high-availability server side realm, I think you'll find listening to my conversation with Adam to be a very worthwhile way to spend 33 minutes of your time. I myself found it fascinating! Check outAdam's site if you'd like more information about his work and his very interesting Enterprise Java ideas.

You can find all this year's java.net Community Corner podcasts as they are published on the JavaOne Community Corner Podcastpage.


In Java Today, there are two new java.net Community Corner podcasts. In Real World Java EE Patterns: Rethinking Best Practices, Java Champion Adam Bien talks with java.net editor Kevin Farnham about JavaEE and enterprise computing best practices: "The complexity and bloat often associated with Java EE are largely due to the inherent complexity of distributed computing; otherwise, the platform is surprisingly simple. Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3.1 actually consists of annotated classes and interfaces that are even leaner than classic POJOs; it would be hard to find anything more to simplify. Nonetheless, (mis)use of Java EE can lead to bloated and overstated architectures. I would like to discuss the essential ingredients of a lean service-oriented architecture (SOA), then explain how to implement one in Java EE without compromising maintainability..."

In Pavel Suk and Jakub Podlesak on Prague and Java Communities, Jim Wright interviews Pavel Suk (Directory of the Prague Engineering Center) and Jakub Podlesak (head of the Prague JUG): "Prague is not only one of the most mystical cities in the world, it also hosts Sun Engineering Center. Do engineers there work on transmutation of metals into gold, elixir of life or something else? Why are the communities in Czech Republic active? Is beer cheaper than water? Myths and truths about communities revealed during this session."

Janice Heiss recently published All Things Java: Continuing the Conversation With Java Champion Alan Williamson : "java.sun.com (JSC): You are the original creator, chief architect, and coder for the J2EE CFML engine BlueDragonthat runs MySpace. Give us a glimpse of how you created it and how it works..."


In today's Weblogs, Roberto Chinnici posted Help with the Java EE 6 training courses and certifications: "We are in the process of updating the training and certification materials for Java EE 6. We've done the first part of the job in collecting and analyzing the tasks that a Java EE developer may be expected to perform as..."

Ed Burns announces Recording of May JSF2 Complete Tour Webinar Available: "Recording of May JSF2 Complete Tour Webinar Available. Well, even though this webinar was performed for about 60 people and recorded live on 14 May 2009, and the slides were published that same day, it's taken much longer to get the recording published"

And Terrence Barr posted New & noteworthy: "Just wanted to make sure you check the Java Mobile & Embedded Community home page once in a while - we've just posted a bunch of new content: Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA LWUIT Designer Update: Redesign Your Resources Prototype..."


In the Forums,elaltaico is working on a keyReleased problem: "Hello. I have lots of buttons and I use keyReleased to define what they will perform when user clicks them. They work fine. But, unfortunately when I click one button first it goes to next button then it does what I want. I meant first it goes to next button then it does what I defined for keyReleased. For instance, when I pressed button1, first of all it goes to button2 then it will go to form2A() which is defined inside keyReleased method of button1. Could you please tell me how to avoid it is going to next button ? Also, it does not happen when I use keyPressed()... "

eniojr asks about a Java Module: "Hi all, I have a question about Glassfish I hope you can help me with: How can I execute a class with a main method in the application server? I've created a class with the main method, I've created the jar file and added as a java module in the deployment description file. I was expecting that once I started the application server, the main method would be automatically executed. But instead, I only can make it to execute by launching the Java Web Start..."

And cheatex has a Problem with using jax-ws maven plugin 1.10 on JDK 1.5: "Hi, i have used jax-ws maven plugin version 1.10(this version used by default) in java 1.6 successfully, but when i attempt to build projects under 1.5 i get following error: $ mvn install -e Warning: JAVA_HOME environment variable is not set. ..."


The current Spotlightis "Podcast: Global Software Engineering Class Teaches FOSS Development Techniques": "Educator Dragutin Petkovic talks with java.net's Gary Thompson in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast recorded at JavaOne, presenting a synopsis of a Global Software Engineering class. The class is designed based on Dragutin's years of experience of teaching jointly at San Francisco State University (SFSU), the University of Applied Sciences, Fulda University, Germany, and recently with Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The class uses numerous Free and Open Source Software tools and teaches FOSS development techniques."


The new java.net Poll asks "What's the most significant new feature in NetBeans 6.7?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include a new article by Jeff Friesen, Introducting Custom Cursors to JavaFX. In this article, Jeff shows developers how to leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom cursors in versions 1.2 and 1.1.1. Meanwhile, Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



The very last podcast interview I did at this year's JavaOne was one of the best: my talk with Adam Bien on JavaEE and rethinking best practices...  

At JavaOne, Jim Wright interviewed SwingLabs project members Jan Haderka and Alex Potochkin in a java.net Community Corner podcast. The 16-minute interview covered curr ]]>SwingX.

First, Jan announced that Alex is taking over leadership of the project from Richard Bair. Alex noted that the many SwingLabs subprojects are actually independently managed, and the great work the subproject leaders have done makes his role as leader of the umbrella SwingLabs project much easier.

The SwingLabs project is intended as a playground for development of future Swing-related components and capabilities. Multiple elements that were originally developed in SwingLabs projects have been incorporated into Java 6 and JDK 7.

In addition to SwingX, the jxlayer subproject was highlighted in the interview. Jxlayer, a universal decorator for Swing components, is among the subprojects which have contributed to the broader Java releases.

Significant development is also happening in the swingx-ws subproject. Swingx-ws addresses web-oriented tasks using JavaBeans and Swing.

The SwingLabs project is seeking new contributors. You can assist with one of the existing subprojects, or start a new incubator project. Visit the SwingLabs project site to learn more about the project and subprojects, and find out how you can contribute.

You can find all this year's java.net Community Corner podcasts as they are published on the JavaOne Community Corner Podcast page.


In Java Today, theTrident animation library for Java applications (code-named Acumen). Trident aims to simplify the development of rich animation effects in Java based UI applications, addressing both simple and complex scenarios - and you can read the available documentation in the project Wiki."

And Ed Burns reports on his Brief interview with Cay Horstmann, author of Core JSF, on 20090602 at JavaOne: "Summary of a JavaOne hallway conversation about JSF: it's gotten a lot better. I had a brief conversation with Cay Horstmann during JavaOne at which I was eager to hear his list of gripes about JSF..."


In the Forums, elaltaico asks how to make a panel nonscrollable: "Hello. I do develop applications for Nokia mobilephones and I use LWUIT design to design my application.I have two panels inside one panel. Third panel is full of buttons which are inserted one under other. There are some data at fourth panel. When I go to next button at third panel, also third panel goes next line. It means user can't see other line when I go to next button. Because third panel and fourth panel are BoxLayouts (Y_AXIS). I want to make fourth panel stable. I meant when user goes to next button, fourth panel will remain as it remains before I am going to next button. It means I want fourth panel to stay as it should be..."

jagwire has questions regarding Data inside ClientConnectionHandler: "Hello, I have a ClientConnectionHandler I'm using to map WonderlandClientIDs, WonderlandClientSenders, and CallIDs from the voicebridge. The problem is, I'm grabbing the sender and ClientIDs from messageReceived() and (trying to) putting them inside a hashmap, but when I try to grab them back out of the hashmap, I get null values. There's been talk that it might be an issue with ManagedObjects. I've looked into it, but I'm not entirely sure what I'm doing. Does anyone have any ideas?..."

And falnik has a WebService encryption problem: "Hi, I'm having a tough time trying to encrypt a WebService I'm developing. I'm using NetBeans 6.5.1. The WebService is using the Mutual Certificates security mechanism; I generated both the client and server keys/certificates and set them on both sides. When I'm accessing this WebService from an application that is deployed on the same machine, it works perfectly. But when I try to access it from an another computer, it doesn't seem to work. I'm receiving this message(server side): WSS1913: Key used to decrypt EncryptedKey cannot be null ..."


The current Spotlight is "Podcast: Global Software Engineering Class Teaches FOSS Development Techniques": "Educator Dragutin Petkovic talks with java.net's Gary Thompson in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast recorded at JavaOne, presenting a synopsis of a Global Software Engineering class. The class is designed based on Dragutin's years of experience of teaching jointly at San Francisco State University (SFSU), the University of Applied Sciences, Fulda University, Germany, and recently with Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The class uses numerous Free and Open Source Software tools and teaches FOSS development techniques."


The new java.net Poll asks "What's the most significant new feature in NetBeans 6.7?". The poll will run through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include two new articles today. Francesco Azzola's Integrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol. Atif Razzaq's Getting Started with BlackBerry J2ME Development teaches you how to set up a development environment for BlackBerry applications, using three sample applications to demonstrate how to get started.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


-->


Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

 

 

 

At JavaOne, Jim Wright interviewed SwingLabs project members Jan Haderka and Alex Potochkin in a java.net Community Corner podcast...

Janice J. Heiss of the Sun Developer Network interviewed Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine in a java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at JavaOne. Early in the interview, Janice asked Kirk about the nature of performance tuning. Kirk opens many of his presentations with the following statement (for example, see slide 4 in the presentation Kirk used in the Java Performance Tuning mini-talk he gave in the java.net booth at JavaOne):

The resemblance of any opinion, recommendation or comment made during this presentation to performance tuning advice is merely coincidental.

By this, he means that each performance tuning problem is unique. There is no such thing as one answer that fits all cases.

Kirk makes a distinction between developers and testers. Developers believe they know innately how to make an application faster. But often, what seems from a developer's point of view to be a way of coding that will result in better performance doesn't turn out that way. Meanwhile, someone whose job is to test software looks for bottlenecks in the code as it executes, rather than thinking in terms of the design and implementation of the code.

Kirk says that one of the greatest causes of poorly performing applications is overly complicated code. One of the reasons for this, in Java code, is that complex code can confuse the compiler, resulting in the code not being fully optimized. In this sense, sometimes writing 10 lines can produce a faster application than a clever 3-line implementation that accomplishes the same task. If the compiler doesn't "understand" the cleverness, it won't know how to optimize it; whereas the more straightforward 10 lines will be reduced into highly efficient byte code. Hence, the developer's fewer lines and characters can end up having poorer performance in the actual operational application.

Kirk sees cloud computing as not too different from the large data centers that we have today. The network issues are a potential complication. With respect to performance tuning in the cloud, Kirk says the difficulty is the lack of tools available for analyzing applications that run in the cloud.

Janice asked Kirk about JDK 7. He sees the added concurrency aspects as being the most important, along with improvements that will become available in developer tools.

In response to Janice's questions about JavaOne 2009 and the general mood of the conference, Kirk said people are concerned about the acquisition of Sun by Oracle. His view is that the other recent Java-related acquisitions by Oracle have generally turned out well. He thinks there are definitely some positive possibilities that might come out of the acquisition, especially with regard to addressing the issue of fragmentation of the Java platform.

The 26-minute podcast lets you see a different side of Kirk Pepperdine from what you see in one of his formal presentations (for example, the mini-talk podcast mentioned above). Janice has interviewed Kirk in the past, so their chat proceeds like it's part of a conversation that's been going on for years, and which (they and we hope) will continue at next year's JavaOne conference.

You can find all this year's java.net Community Corner podcasts as they are published on the JavaOne Community Corner Podcastpage.


In Java Today, In Janice J. Heiss interviews Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine about Java performance tuning and more, in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne.

Peligri reports the Top 7 Reasons ... Why GlassFish v3 is Your Lightweight Solution: 'One of our goals with GlassFish v3 is to significantly expand the number of use cases where GlassFish can be used. To do this we want to retain (and expand!) the enterprise quality attributes present in GlassFish v2(.1) but also make it much more "lightweight"...'

Meanwhile, the GlassFish team is asking GlassFish users to Help Sparky with this Survey on Glassfish: "Dear Friend of GlassFish: Please help us in the Sun GlassFish core team better understand the patterns of adoption of GlassFish by taking a few minutes to answer this brief survey. Please click on the "Next" button below to move to the next page and start the survey..."


In today's Weblogs, Terrence Barr is Back from Brazil (and vacation ...): "Back from Brazil and a nice two-week break from traveling. Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days Latin America (M3DD/LA ) was extremely successful - sold-out at over 550 attendees, buzzing with activity and enthusiasm, and well-organized. It was a pleasure to..."

Fabrizio Giudici announces jrawio 1.5.0 released (with experimental OSGi support): 'All the relevant information in my DZone post: "jrawiois one of the projects I'm managing and delivers the capability of reading "camera raw" image formats with Java (technically, it's just a plugin of Java Image I/O, so it doesn't have a specific API). As far as I know it's the only FLOSS 100% Java library able to read everything in a "camera raw" file...'

And Kohsuke Kawaguchi announces the upcoming Hudson Hackathon/Meetup, 7/18 in San Francisco: "We'll have a meet up at Slide.com San Francisco office on this Saturday. If you are around, please join us. To quote the announcement e-mail from R. Tyler Ballance..."


In the Forums,jvrobert wonders if there is news related to Metro initialization performance: "I could have sworn I saw something on one of the Metro pages about Metro no longer needing to download the WSDL at runtime - is that the case? It seems to be doing it in my case. I've got a maven generated web service client with all the policy and WSDL data included in the jar file, but creation of the service client proxy is still very slow (a few seconds, which for a short-running command-line tool seems like forever). Is there some trick to get the initialization time down?"

pccontact asks Dose Glassfish each SOAP request use one HTTP Thread to handle the
process?
: " process?
Dear all, In my SOAP application, it looks like that each request from the client will use one HTTP thread even the NIO is the nature of the Glassfish. If in my SOAP process wait for some period of time, the thread will not relase for another incoming request even in NIO, right? Can anyone explain about this for me? Thanks!"

And kameit00 has a Question: Overlay on a JTable when editing a cell: "Hi, is it possible to use JXLayer to paint a button on a JTable, when the user starts to edit a cell? Example: The user starts to edit a cell in the table. If that happens, I want to draw a button beside the edited cell. With the examples I've found, I'm not sure if I can do this with JXLayer. Regards, Kai"


The current Spotlightis "Podcast: Global Software Engineering Class Teaches FOSS Development Techniques": "Educator Dragutin Petkovic talks with java.net's Gary Thompson in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast recorded at JavaOne, presenting a synopsis of a Global Software Engineering class. The class is designed based on Dragutin's years of experience of teaching jointly at San Francisco State University (SFSU), the University of Applied Sciences, Fulda University, Germany, and recently with Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The class uses numerous Free and Open Source Software tools and teaches FOSS development techniques."


The new java.net Poll asks "What's the most significant new feature in NetBeans 6.7?". The poll will run through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include two new articles today. Francesco Azzola'sIntegrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol. Atif Razzaq's Getting Started with BlackBerry J2ME Development teaches you how to set up a development environment for BlackBerry applications, using three sample applications to demonstrate how to get started.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Janice J. Heiss of the Sun Developer Network interviewed Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine in a java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at JavaOne...  

At last month's JavaOne, Josh Marinacci visited the java.net booth and was interviewed by Ed Ort about his work with JavaFX and the new Java Store. Josh is well known for his work on JavaFX, but he had been secretly working on the Java Store for quite a while by the time JavaOne happened.

Unfortunately, there were some technical difficulties during the interview. Still, with a few volume adjustments, you can indeed hear pretty much everything that was said in the podcast.

Josh talks about the latest advances in JavaFX, including the new Version 1.2 release that came out during JavaOne. Among the major recent advances is the addition of Solaris and Linux to the list of platforms that support JavaFX applications.

The interview included many demos of new JavaFX capabilities. Josh said that all the demos he presented, along with lots more, are available on the JavaFX site. There you can also find documentation, tutorials, and the latest JavaFX news and updates.

This interview was actually a Community Corner mini-talk, so there was a live audience that asked plenty of questions. Josh told Ed that one of the questions he has been asked again and again during JavaOne was if the Java Store was limited to Java and JavaFX applications, or if the store was going to be available for Swing applications and applications in other languages. Josh's answer: the Java Store is for any application that runs in a JVM. For example, you could write an app with a Scala GUI and put it into the store.

The Java storefront itself is a JavaFX application. WebStart is used in the store, running in JavaFX. The store's back end is Solaris running GlassFish, with JSPs, etc. Josh didn't know all the server-side details, since his focus has been on the front end, the APIs, etc.

The Java Store will include information for each application in the store that defines dependencies, such as the software that a user must have installed on their system in order to run the application.

I myself didn't get to experience much of the almost 21-minute interview and the Q&A that followed as it happened -- I was in the back trying to resolve the technical issues. I'm happy to say that we did get a listenable podcast out of Josh's visit, and it was indeed a very interesting talk. So, if you're interested in Josh's recent work, JavaFX 1.2, the Java Store, etc., have a listen!

You can find all the Community Corner 2009 podcasts as they are published on the java.net Community Corner Podcastspage.


In Java Today, Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein announces JavaFX Balls 2.2: Effects and more: "In the last updates, I did a quick port to JavaFX 1.2 and evaluated its performance again (and again). But as I keep playing with this benchmark and learning JavaFX, I added a few extra enhancements: * New options of 512 Balls (desktop) / 128 Balls (mobile), and Adaptive 60fps. These make easier to compare to some other versions of Bubblemark..."

Fabrizio Giudici writes about his Sun radio interview regardingThe state of the Union, pardon, of the Tidalwave projects: "Yesterday I've been interviewed by Sun Microsystems Radio (yes, Sun has got a radio) about my take on JavaFX. Since Chhandomay Mandal asked me about my current and future projects with JavaFX, I think it's a good opportunity to recap the state of my FLOSS projects and their plans. So maybe I can understand what I'm doing..."

And Sahoo announced that btrace is now integrated in GlassFish v3: "Expect a detailed message from Sreeni and/or other monitoring folks of GlassFish, but I just came to know that BTrace has found its way into GlassFish v3. This project, which started as a one-man effort by Sundar, has been able to attract other open source developers' attention and is now a well established project. It is used by many of us to solve issues where debuggers can't be used efficiently..."


In today's Weblogs, John Ferguson Smart talks about Maven in the Real World - talk available online: "Earlier this week I gave a talk at Skills Matter on "Getting Serious About Build Automation: Using Maven in the Real World". The video/podcast version of this talk is now available online, thanks to the folks at SkillsMatter. You..."

John O'Conner presents his Speculations regarding Google Chrome OS: "Maybe Google Chrome OS will finally be the successful reincarnation of JavaOS? The similarities are just too obvious. Today's announcement of Google's Chrome OS is exciting in a few ways. I think it has implications for Java developers. With hindsight, I now think that Larry Ellison was hinting about Google's Chrome OS when he expressed some of his desires for JavaFX on small netbook-like devices..."

And Harold Carr points us to A Common Ant Build File for Metro-Based Services and Clients: "There are many ways to build Metro-based services and clients. This common ant build file handles most of them. For example: starting from Java and running containerless; starting from WSDL and deploying to GlassFish or Tomcat. An article I wrote shows a common ant build file for many configurations..."


In the Forums,Annies is seeing a Felix fileinstall issue in latest build: "With b54, when I copy a bundle to autodeploy-bundles dir, Felix fileinstall picks it up and installs it. But it fails to start the bundle with an error like this - Error during dispatch. (java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: URI is not absolute. This used to work fine before. Last I tested was with b51..."

Alexis Moussine continues a conversation Re: Glassfish v3 in very small scale (memory and cpu): "Hello Burak, How are you measuring the memory used? Could it be that the 200MB you are seeing are the -Xmx192m (same as
-Xms) JVM settings for the heap and reported by an OS tool like top? Will the application run (no outofmemoryerror) if you lower these values (that would require lowering -XX:MaxPermSize to something like a 1/3rd of the heap size)? ..."

And ming_chan has run into a problem Re: Customizing marshalling: "Hello, I am using Hibernate 3 in glassfish v2.1 and I ran into this same problem. In my project there are stateless session beans exposing SOAP web service interface. These SLSBs access Hibernate entities and in many cases, returns one or Collection of these entities in the web service response. During JAXB marshaling when constructing the web service response, if a entity (the one to be returned) has related entities via a lazy load association then it throws: org.hibernate.LazyInitializationException: could not initialize proxy - no Session..."


The current Spotlightis Paul Dietel's java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study": 'Educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Deitel talks about the ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study from his book "Java: How to Program, 8/e" in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at at JavaOne 2009. Download the slides so you can follow along as you listen to Paul's presentation.'


The new java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". Today (Thursday) is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include two new articles today. Francesco Azzola'sIntegrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol. Atif Razzaq's Getting Started with BlackBerry J2ME Development teaches you how to set up a development environment for BlackBerry applications, using three sample applications to demonstrate how to get started.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



At last month's JavaOne, Josh Marinacci visited the java.net booth and was interviewed by Ed Ort about his work with JavaFX and the new Java Store...  

Kirk Pepperdine gave a very interesting mini-talk in the java.net booth at JavaOne. We recorded his talk and made it into ajava.net Community Corner 2009 podcast.

Kirk's presentation includes lots of interaction with the audience, and plenty of doses of humor, though not humor that anyone who's not a developer would understand. In fact, if you haven't done a fair amount of work on performance tuning, you may not get all that many of the jokes right off. Kirk's jokes are sometimes subtle on the surface, just like performance tuning itself.

In the talk, Kirk presents many examples of attempts to isolate performance issues, deftly illustrating how difficult it actually is find bottlenecks and increase the performance of a poorly performing application. At many points in the talk, Kirk shows results of performance testing that seem to produce strange results -- for example, the case where a measurement of the time to complete a section of code produces a result of zero seconds. How can this be?

At this point in the talk, Kirk matter-of-factly states that this test proves that Java is indeed the most efficient programming language in existence, because if you programmed the same application in any other language, for example C++, executing the code would indeed occupy at least some time. After the audience ponders these strangenesses for a few seconds, aware that something doesn't quite seem right, Kirk explains what was really happening: the Java execution time was zero because the compiler saw that the code does nothing, and so it is in effect excluded in the byte-code representation of the application.

See the earlier post, that I wrote at JavaOne, for a few more examples of the points Kirk made during his Community Corner mini-talk.

At the end of Kirk's talk, he says he's making the slides available. I'm checking with him about that, and I'll add a link to the presentation on our podcast page as soon as I have it. [Update: Kirk sent me his presentation, and I've made it available for download (PDF).]

Visit the java.net Community Corner Podcasts page to find the 2009 podcasts as they are published. We've published about half of the podcasts now.


In Java Today, In Kirk Pepperdine on Java Performance Tuning, Kirk Pepperdine talks about Java performance tuning in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne.

In Josh Marinacci on JavaFX and the Java Store, Ed Ort interviews Josh Marinacci in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, recorded at JavaOne. Josh talks about his work with JavaFX and the new Java Store.

In Hudson on iPhone and Android , Peligri writes about Hudson on iPhone and Android: "Hudson fans no longer have to be envious of POssO (the portable administration console for OpenSSO) or of Zen (the OpenDS variant); now you can also show-off your iPhone through the Hudson Helper for iPhone - see it in action Building Galileo..."


In today's Weblogs, Arun Gupta announces that he received a FISL 2009 Speaker Certificate: "Received a "certificate of attendance as speaker" for recently concluded FISL 10. This is sweet, thanks FISL organizers! It certainly adds a personal touch to the whole experience. I don't remember receiving a personal certificate like this :)"

Cay Horstmann asks Are Web Services the New CORBA?: "I am updating the Core JSF book and just got to the section on injecting a web service into a JSF managed bean. The example I used in the previous edition is no longer usable and I can't seem to find a replacement that is interesting, long-lived, and works with JAX-WS. Am I beating a dead dog?"

And Kumar Jayanti completes an earlier post in Security Token Configuration in Metro Contd....: "Continuation of the previous post on Security Token Configuration in Metro. My previous post Security Token Configuration in Metro has exceeded the maximum limits (even after having used the extended entry) of a post and hence when i added some more details yesterday, i am seeing that the tail end of my post was truncated. So here is what was in the tail end..."


In the Forums,errorken is wondering about JSF 1.2_13 on glassfish 2.1: "We are using glassfish2.1. I'm trying to use the latest JSF (RI) version : 1.2_13 in our application. I know I could be upgrading the version in the lib dir of the server (the admin console will probably work with _13 as well) but I'm trying to avoid this. Its better if applications can decide on themselves which libraries they want. I first tried to turn off class loader delegation via the sun-web.xml. This is not a problem since the webapp is standalone and does not depend on other modules (such as ejbs etc). But no luck, the version output on startup is still the same as before..."

tanvirtonu asks about Getting the beans property at runtime.: "I have made a bean component automatically created by netbeans.Then I bind a jtextfield's text property to that bean's property and in my main method I set the property for that bean.Yet, I m not getting the property name in my textfield after the program runs.Can anybody help. Here is the bean component that netbeans created for me by default. package saraelectro; import java.beans.*; import java.io.Serializable; public class myBean implements Serializable { ... "

And iliasr initiated an extended conversation involving Streaming over JXTA: "Hello, I was trying to implement a streaming mechanism over a JXTA network, with the platform's transport methods (pipes and sockets)... Using JxtaSocket I came to find that the performance of the streaming was much less than acceptable. I then replaced the sockets with the purer JxtaBiDiPipe, but neither this method proved efficient... Is such a thing as streaming over jxta with its own transport methods possible, or have I to implement it using the plain Socket API of Java? I came across a couple of jxta projects... "


The current Spotlightis Paul Dietel's java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study": 'Educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Deitel talks about the ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study from his book "Java: How to Program, 8/e" in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at at JavaOne 2009. Download the slides so you can follow along as you listen to Paul's presentation.'


This week's java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". Today (Thursday) is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include two new articles today. Francesco Azzola'sIntegrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol. Atif Razzaq's Getting Started with BlackBerry J2ME Development teaches you how to set up a development environment for BlackBerry applications, using three sample applications to demonstrate how to get started.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Kirk Pepperdine gave a very interesting mini-talk in the java.net booth at JavaOne...  

I learned quite a lot about robotics at JavaOne. Most of the time I when I was manning the counter at the java.net booth, I was accompanied by members of the java.net Robotics Community. In the early evening of the opening day of JavaOne, community members Jim Wright, Bruce Boyes, Roger Brinkley, and Brian Jenkins gathered to record a java.net Community Corner podcast. The scheduled topic was "robotics and education," but the discussion was more wide ranging than that, starting out with talk about java.net and Oracle, Larry Elison's presentation at the end of the opening keynote, and the future of the java.net Robotics Community given Oracle's acquisition of Sun.

While robotics seems the "odd man out" among java.net communities, in terms of immediate relevance for Oracle, the group agreed that robotics might be important to Oracle in the future, given Larry Elison's statements about his interest in hardware, and his desire to not allow other innovative companies to entirely own the marketplace for handheld mobile devices, etc.

The discussion did include a lot of talk about robotics, as well as the value of the java.net community. Brian Jenkins is a student, who will be graduating and enter the job market soon. He spoke about the value he has found in being a member of the java.net community. He hopes for greater engagement with universities by the java.net community, and vice versa.

The value of collaboration within the context of education was discussed. Brian noted that once students graduate, they need to collaborate with co-workers. Hence, it would be better if universities brought collaboration into their teaching methods. He considers java.net to be an ideal platform for bringing engineering students into collaboration with professionals and other students.

With respect to university education, times are changing, certainly. For the non-students in the discussion, collaboration was not allowed when they were in college. It would have been considered cheating. Today things have moved a bit in the collaborative direction, but there is still a long way to go.

Listening to this discussion, I was reminded of Felipe Gaucho'spodcast about the PUJ (Premio Universitario Java) Competition, where software developed by students is judged by other students, professors, and software engineering professionals. Awareness of the value of the collaborative approach is definitely on the rise.

The discussion ended with some wondering about how java.net will evolve into the future: will it become more of a standard "developer network"? Will its open, free-wheeling nature be extended through increased involvement with universities?

These questions weren't answered in the Robotics Community podcast. I'd say it's ultimately up to the java.net community itself to provide the answers. My guess is that's what Oracle would like to see as well.


In Java Today, we've posted the java.net Robotics Community Roundtable: Robotics and Education, a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast that is a round table discussion between Robotics Communitymembers Jim Wright, Bruce Boyes, Roger Brinkley, and Brian Jenkins on robotics and education.

We've also posted The SwingLabs Project and Subprojects. In this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, also recorded at JavaOne, java.net's Jim Wright interviews SwingLabs team members Jan Haderka and Alex Potochkin. The podcast is a discussion of the Swinglabs project and subprojects, current and future development of SwingX, common use cases for components provided by SwingX, and explanation of new demos.

Ed Ort recently wrote an article titled Building Cool RIA Enterprise Applications With JavaFX: "Java FX is a platform for creating and delivering rich Internet applications (RIAs) -- web applications that use rich media types such as video, audio, and graphics -- that can run in a wide variety of devices, anywhere from handsets to laptops to desktops. Although the JavaFX platform is only half a year old -- its initial full release was in December 2008 -- people are already building some very cool applications with it..."


In today's Weblogs, Varun Nischal writes about DocWeb | Dynamic Implementation of Javadocs: "DocWeb is a dynamic implementation of javadoc which allows a user to browse and search API documentation. An SDN member can contribute translations, comments, code samples and bug references as well as rate the contributions."

Jean-Francois Arcand posted @Cluster: Clustering your Comet application using Atmosphere: "It is really simple to add clustering support to an Atmosphere's Comet based application, and deploy it inside any Servlet Container supporting Servlet 3.0, Comet or not. You just have to decide which group technology you want to use, thanks to Atmosphere Plug in: Shoal or JGroups!"

And Tim Boudreau asks Do you really want long running examples in tech books?: 'I've coauthored two books about programming, and in both I heard the complaint (paraphrasing) "There wasn't one cohesive example that was built up chapter-through-chapter"'


In the Forums, Uwe Seimet has a problem with [webtier] ManagedProperty annotation not working: "Hello, The @ManagedProperty annotation does not work as I expect it for both of my setups (Tomcat 6.0.22 with the latest Mojarra 2.0.0 snapshot and a recent Glassfish preview). My code looks like this: @ManagedBean final public class MyBean { @ManagedProperty(name = "folder", value = "#{param.folder}") ..."

jferrandi is working with Service side Jaxws-maven-plugin wsgen generate wsdl with security policies: "Hi all. I've got an Ejb Maven project, implementing a Web Service. I use jaxws-maven-plugin in my pom, withwsgen ti generate the WSDL file. this work fine. The goal is to generate the wsdl without deploying the WS on a container. Right now i want to use Security policies. The wsit file is well located, but WSDL never contains any security policies. This is not the traditional use of wsgen, so i wonder if wsgen Can generate wsdl with the security policies. To my mind, this should be possible, because for exemple Glassfish generate the wsdl at runtime, with the security polices..."

And bcatrysse has a problem with LWUIT on real STB: "I tried to run a Hello LUIT World Xlet on real GEM based STB (with Sun based CDC/PBP CM 1.1.2) and can't get it running. It seems it cannot work with implementations that can only have one window (one Hscene) (Mulitple windowing support is not required by MHP. For starters I run against initXlet() java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: Cannot create more than one window per graphics device at java.awt.Window..."


The current Spotlightis Paul Dietel's java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study": 'Educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Deitel talks about the ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study from his book "Java: How to Program, 8/e" in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at at JavaOne 2009. Download the slides so you can follow along as you listen to Paul's presentation.'


This week's java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". Thursday is the last full day of voting.


Our Feature Articles include two new articles today. Francesco Azzola'sIntegrating JavaFX with JavaEE Using Spring and Hessian Protocol shows how a JavaFX client can call remote JavaEE services using the Spring framework and the Hessian protocol. Atif Razzaq's Getting Started with BlackBerry J2ME Development teaches you how to set up a development environment for BlackBerry applications, using three sample applications to demonstrate how to get started.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



I learned quite a lot about robotics at JavaOne...  

I always find it interesting to talk to people who are engaged in developing highly-scalable software. I very much appreciate the difficulties they face and must overcome, having worked on developing multithreaded applications myself since the early 1990s (using Sun's early C SMP threading libraries).

So, I very much enjoyed talking with Sun's Owen Kellett, a lead developer for Project Darkstar, an open source, highly scalable, server-side platform for massive online games and virtual worlds. If scalable server-side platforms interest you as much as they interest me, I think you'll find the 13-minute podcast we recorded at this year's JavaOne well worthy of a listen.

Owen talks about the differences between gaming and applications such as banking as being related primarily to the trade-off between latency and data durability. For example, in a banking application, it is absolutely critical that the transaction is guaranteed to complete, or it must be rolled-back if completing it does not occur for some reason. In this situation, it's OK if there is some latency. It doesn't matter if a bank application user sometimes has to wait 25 seconds, as long as they are sure that the monetary transaction is correctly completed.

With online gaming, however, a delay of even a few seconds between when a player issues a command and sees the response can make the game unplayable. So, with online gaming and virtual worlds, minimizing latency is critical. Meanwhile, the absolute rigorous data integrity that is required in a banking application isn't necessary in an online game. Does it really matter if the last few seconds of a game player's actions are lost once every few months? Not really.

This difference is in large measure the defining factor for why a gaming-centric application server platform is needed. Most commercial application servers are tuned for the business environment, emphasizing transactional integrity at the cost of increased latency.

Still, Darkstar is a transactional system, with automated data persistence. If a server goes down, the user can resume the game normally with less than a few seconds of lost data. The Darkstar event-driven transactions are normally processed in less than a few milliseconds, much faster than is typically the case with business transactions where ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability) must be rigorously enacted. In online games and virtual worlds, it's advantageous to sacrifice a little bit on the durability side in order to dramatically decrease latency. This is what the Darkstar server accomplishes.

Project Darkstar is written entirely in Java on the server side. However, it is language-agnostic on the client side, providing the possibility for anyone to develop an API that can interact with the Darkstar server. The external developer community has already developed Flash clients, C# clients, Python clients, and others.

The Darkstar server currently scales superbly when it is run on a single machine with multi-core processors. The server can run on multiple nodes as well. Currently, significant effort is being put into increasing the scalability in the multi-node environment, where you face the issues of having multiple nodes interacting with a single data store on the back end.

In addition, the team is researching means to automatically discover when multiple clients are interacting with each other, modifying the same data areas. In this case, in the multi-node environment, it is most efficient to have the same node perform the processing for both clients.

I asked Owen about "the 15-minute experience" I'd seen on the web site. What's this? Basically, the Darkstar server can be downloaded, installed, and deployed in 15 minutes. You can get your first little demo application (provided with the download) running in just 15 minutes, which confirms for you that you have a proper install and base configuration.

If you're interested in online gaming and virtual worlds software, and/or scalable transactional platforms in general, I think you'll find listening to Project Darkstar: the Open Source Highly-Scalable Server-Side Gaming Platform an interesting way to spend 13 minutes and 34 seconds (yes, in the podcast Owen beat his own "15-minute experience" criterion!).


In Java Today, we've published Project Darkstar: the Open Source Highly-Scalable Server-Side Gaming Platform. Owen Kellett talks with java.net editor Kevin Farnham about the Project Darkstar, the open source massive online gaming platform, in this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast recorded at JavaOne. Here's Owen's preview of the Project Darkstar presentation he prepared for the podcast: "Project Darkstar is an open-source server-side Java platform for the development and exectution of horizontally scalable online games, virtual worlds, and social networking software. More than just a communications framework, Project Darkstar boasts a simple API that transparently provides a multithreaded, transactional, persistent, and scalable system without the need for zones or shards..."

Educator Dragutin Petkovic talks with java.net's Gary Thompson in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast that was recorded at JavaOne. In the podcast, Dragutin presents a synopsis of a Global Software Engineering class. The class is designed based on Dragutin's years of experience of teaching jointly at San Francisco State University (SFSU), the University of Applied Sciences, Fulda University, Germany, and recently with Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The class uses numerous Free and Open Source Software tools and teaches FOSS development techniques.

The JavaChecker Project team reports that JavaChecker-2.5.1 is ready: "JavaChecker-2.5.1 is out. This is static analyzer of Java source code, which provide set of basic checks and allows users implements own checkers using JavaChecker infrastructure. This releases include set of checks, developed forproject coin, which may be used for studying of applicability of proposed language features to existing codebase."


In today's Weblogs, Tim Boudreau looks at tradeoffs in API Design vs. API Usability: "I took last week off to work on some Wicket web programming - seeing as my day-job is desktop programming. I've done a lot of talks on API design, focusing on how to not "paint yourself into a corner" in terms of backward compatibility. There is a complementary subject - API usability, that deserves equal consideration. But reconciling the two is a hard problem."

Mauricio Leal reports on OpenSolaris Tour 2009 - Day 2 - Sao Leopoldo/BRAZIL: "Sao Leopoldo is a small city outside of the great metropolitan area of Porto Alegre. In there, just happened the Day 2 of OpenSolaris Tour 2009 at UNISINOS."

And Jim Driscoll posted A tale of two components (JSF2): "In this blog, I'll examine two different ways to create a poll component with JSF 2, and in doing so, we'll look briefly at the two different ways that you specify id's in the two JSF 2 Ajax APIs."


In the Forums,sourabhpawar is Upgrading to GF v2.1 - Problem with WS-Addressing: "Hello Metro folks, We have a NHIN gateway implementation from last year that we developed using an older OpenESB and Metro build. We are in the process of testing the feasibility of upgrading the base software to the latest Glassfish ESB v2.1. We are trying to deploy one application (and its dependencies) onto a fresh Glassfish ESB v2.1 installation and are getting errors with respect to WS-Addressing. This test does not involve security at the message level, or transport level. Here is the error we get (attached log-with-policy section from log.txt)..."

peppeme has a problem where a jconsole connection failed with remote glassfish: "I wish to monitor the entire remote glassfish server (no only one applications) with jconsole, but I can't the connection failed. I add in domain.xml these lines: -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.ssl=false -Dcom.sun.management.jmxremote.authenticate=false Add this to the admin-service element..."

And rjounwal wonders about Navigation in Multiple Component: "Hi, I have three component in a Single Row (Label1,TextField1,ComboBox1) which is added using BorderLayout, same in Second (Label2,TextField2,ComboBox2) and third (Label3,TextField3,ComboBox3) Row.So here my questions are: 1) When I use setMargin(top,down,l,r) method to fixed GUI issue, and i press Up and Down Navigation key then i found that control sequence TextField1->TextField2->TextField3->Combobox1->Combobox2->Combobox3. When i remove this SetMargin() then it's working fine and found control sequence which i have require..."


The current Spotlightis Paul Dietel's java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study": 'Educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Deitel talks about the ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study from his book "Java: How to Program, 8/e" in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at at JavaOne 2009. Download the slides so you can follow along as you listen to Paul's presentation.'


This week's java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". The poll will run through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include an article by John Ferguson Smart, Grails and Continuous Integration: An Essential Combo, which shows how to set up a Continuous Integration (CI) build job to compile and test your Grails application in Hudson, for automated continuous integration. We're also featuring Felipe Gaucho's article, Exposing Domain Models through the RESTful Service Interface, Part 1, which describes domain models and demonstrates how to create a generic CRUD application.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 82: M3DD/LA: a conversation with the organizers of Mobile, Media, and eMbedded Developer Days/Latin America in Goiania, Brazil. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



I always find it interesting to talk to people who are engaged in developing highly-scalable software...  

Finding specific information has never been easy. At JavaOne, I interviewed Clark Richey in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast titled "MarkMail's java.net Email Search".

In his presentation, Clark demonstrates a lot of capabilities that I think developers will find highly useful when we're searching for information. Think about searching through forums, or searching online using a search engine. It's a time consuming and tedious process. You know the information you need is out there somewhere, but how do you find it?

Java.net on MarkMail catalogues and analyzes emails posted on the java.net site, by members of the java.net communities and projects. As you might guess, a lot of these messages include discussion of programming problems, along with the solutions to those problems. In this sense, MarkMail turns the java.net community email postings into searchable forums.

I had experimented a little bit with the MarkMail search before, but not all that much. After hearing Clark's presentation, I plan to use it a lot more. MarkMail provides some pretty amazing search capabilities, including visualizations that enable you to hone in on specific information that has been posted in potentially multiple email lists. You can create "sets" where you in essence create your own "web site" containing email search results that are of interest to you, and possibly to others (you can share your sets with others). These sets also include capability to create a feed that you and your associates can subscribe to, so you'll receive new updates that match your set's search criteria as new matching emails are posted.

So, let's do an experiment. Say I'm working with GlassFish, and I'm running into some issues trying to configure it with OpenESB. I type

glassfish openesb

into the "java.net on MarkMail" search box and hit my "Enter" key. I'm brought to a MarkMail.org page that shows me a histogram that categorizes by date the more than 4300 email messages somehow related to GlassFish and OpenESB that have been posted on java.net mailing lists. There are also tables showing the email lists where the messages were published, names of people who wrote the messages (for example, Mark S White has sent more than 200 messages that fit the glassfish+openesb search criteria), types of messages, attachments... From this page, I can dig deeper, selecting messages by date, author, list, attachments, etc. If I use the attachments box, I can find messages with a certain type of attachment (for example, jpg images), and can actually look at most types of attachment without having download the files. For example, right now I'm looking at a screenshot that Bing Lu attached to a message he posted in the net.java.dev.open-esb.users mailing list last September.

If you're a developer and you haven't yet tried out the java.net MarkMail search, the next time you're searching for specific information, or if you just want to find out what's being talked about by certain people or in certain java.net communities, give it a try. On every java.net page that has the gray sidebar on the left, you'll find a "java.net on MarkMail" search box at the bottom of the sidebar.

Clark produced a movie (.mov format) that you can download, in addition to listening to the podcast. Do listen to the podcast if what I've described above interests you. java.net on MarkMailreally is an incredibly powerful tool.


In Java Today, we've published "MarkMail's java.net Email Search". In this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, which was recorded at JavaOne, MarkLogic's Clark Richey talks with Kevin Farnham about the MarkMail java.net email search capabilities. In addition to listening to the podcast, you can download and watch the accompanying movie (.mov format).

In Swing Sighting: XKCD Velociraptors, The JavaDesktop Communitynoticed Matthew Beckler's Solution to XKCD Velociraptors Problem #2, and posted the link "because it's a moral imperative. And there's dinosaurs involved." Matthew writes about an unusual problem he solved using Java: 'After introducing my housemates to the wonderful webcomic XKCD, we discovered a quite interesting puzzle in the comic titled "Substitute." I have reproduced it on the right side of this page...'

In Developing for iPhone with Java and XMLVM, From the Mac Java Community: Coke and Code blogger Kevin Glass describes a roundabout means of using Java to create iPhone applications in Portable Game Code - Applet / Android / IPhone - Part 1. "I like Java, I find it very productive. I don't particularly want to alot of work in Obj-C. One code base is better for me, one set of bugs to fix. Being able to test the same code an applet, before having to go to my Mac and IPhone is better. Enter XMLVM, it's a tool that converts from Java byte code into an XML document, and then translates this into other languages - one of these being Obj-C. Ok, it's not really as simple as that but I'll describe the details in the next post."


In today's Weblogs, Cay Horstmann writes about WebBeans in Glassfish v3: "As I am updating my share of chapters in the Core JavaServer Faces book (with the hard parts fortunately being tackled by my coauthor, David Geary), I started playing with WebBeans, erm, Java Contexts and Dependency Injection. I'll keep calling it WebBeans - the alternative JavaCandi is more than I can take. There are two features that are crucial for JSF users: Conversation scope and access to stateful session beans from JSF pages."

Mauricio Leal reports on M3DD/LA - A gather of mobile and embedded community in Latin America: "On June 20th, Brazil hosted the first edition of M3DD/LA (Java Mobile, Media and eMbedded Developer Days - Latin American Edition), in Goiania. The event was huge success (600 attendees) and organizers are considering a big event for next year."

And Jim Driscoll posts a note about Automatic compression of jsf.js: "Just a quick note that we've now added automatic compression of the jsf.js file served by JSF 2. The file size of jsf.js, 71k uncompressed, comes to about 16k compressed (there are a lot of comments in there). There is no user action required to make this happen: If the Project stage is Development, the file is served uncompressed (for ease in debugging with something like Firebug), but if the Project stage is anything else, then the file is compressed (and essentially unreadable, since besides stripping all comments, variable names are stripped, as well as all line breaks)."


In the Forums,alecswan asks about Metro: How to determine the size of the SOAP response on the server?: "I am looking for a way to determine the size of the SOAP response returned from a web service call before it is sent back to the client. A rough size estimate will be sufficient. I tried to estimate the size of the response in a handler method with @PreDestroy annotation, but wasn't able to find a way to do that. Does anybody have an idea on how to get a rough estimate of the SOAP response before sending it to the client? ..."

ikevintv has questions regarding Setting up GlassFish v3 (Prelude) with Solaris 10 SMF: "Hi, I am trying to use Service Management Facility (SMF) with GlassFish v3 Prelude. I tried to follow this documentation: http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/819-3671/gewdn?a=view. I looked into the asadmin help but could not find the "create-service" command listed. I then simply executed "asadmin create-service" to test it and it says comannd is not available. Is the "asadmin create-service" removed with GlassFish v3 Prelude? What about the GlassFish v3 or GlassFish Preview versions?..."

And michaelmaguire announces that Our app finally converted over to LWUIT: BlueWhaleMail: "After some months of work we have finally converted our mobile Facebook and push email application BlueWhaleMail over to using LWUIT. Thanks to the LWUIT team and all the people on the forum for helping us to get this done. [Shameless product endorsement:] It is free. If you'd like to try it out, you can download it from: http://www.bluewhalemail.com/Note that as a demo and to help you get the app set up with your account, we also use microemu on our website to run the actual midlet in your browser... "


The current Spotlightis Paul Dietel's java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study": 'Educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Deitel talks about the ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study from his book "Java: How to Program, 8/e" in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at at JavaOne 2009. Download the slides so you can follow along as you listen to Paul's presentation.'


This week's java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include an article by John Ferguson Smart, Grails and Continuous Integration: An Essential Combo, which shows how to set up a Continuous Integration (CI) build job to compile and test your Grails application in Hudson, for automated continuous integration. We're also featuring Felipe Gaucho's article, Exposing Domain Models through the RESTful Service Interface, Part 1, which describes domain models and demonstrates how to create a generic CRUD application.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 81: JTDF, in which Eric Areseneau talks about Victor D'yakov talks about the new Java Device Testing Framework project in the Mobile & Embedded Community. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Finding specific information has never been easy. At JavaOne, I interviewed Clark Richey in a java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast titled "MarkMail's java.net Email Search"...  

This past week's java.net poll on the Java technologies job market implies that the global economic downturn is far from over, at least for Java developers. In total, 275 votes were cast. Here is the actual question and the results:

What's the current status of the Java technologies employment market?

  • 20.3% (56 votes) - Excellent, plenty of opportunities
  • 46.9% (129 votes) - Stable, I have enough work
  • 6.9% (19 votes) - Better than 6 months ago
  • 22.9% (63 votes) - Still not good
  • 2.9% (8 votes) - Other

So, about 1/3 of the responses were for options that state that imply that the Java employment market is in a recession. Only 2/3 of the votes state that the person has enough work.

Mu posted the comment:

This is an oddly constructed poll: The employment market has currently dried up. Ergo, none of the responses apply

Cajo replied that, in this case, the "Other" category applies. I think Mu would have prefered an option "There currently is no Java technologies employment market," or something like that. Globally, there surely is a Java technologies market, since 20% of respondants are seeing plenty of opportunities. But, in different localities, there may well be virtually no market at all for Java skills and experience.

In a healthy economy, I would expect the "Stable" and "Excellent" categories to garner a combined 95% of the vote. At the 67% level reflected by this poll (which, admittedly, is not scientific), there are a lot of people who are unemployed or under-employed.

In a java.net poll from exactly one year ago, 34% of respondants said that job prospects in their field had gotten better over the past year, and 20% said prospects had gotten worse. And in an August 2006 poll, 75% of respondants were working in a mode that included frequent "time crunches" (emergency situations requiring much more work than normal, to meet release deadlines, etc.).

These polls all asked different questions, but they all indicate the overall level of vibrancy in the Java technologies employment marketplace. In 2006, the experience of too much work to get done in the available time was common. That's certainly not the case today for many Java developers. Of course, again, these are not scientifically administered polls...

New poll: Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?

This week's poll asks Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7? The much-anticipated NetBeans 6.7release came out a few days ago. Are you already using it? Do you plan to try it out soon? Let us know by voting.


In Java Today, Danny Coward posted JavaFX: gr8 2 c on fonz: "What with the release of JavaFX 1.2 andJavaFX phones on sale to developers, and on view, for example here and here, the fact that the JavaFX language and common APIs are the same whether you are on the desktop or on a mobile device (or a TV set top box) is worth chatting about."

Kirill Grouchnikov demonstrates Project Marble - augmented reality in Java with JMF, Java3D, NYArToolkit and Trident: "Today i'm going to talk about setting up the development environment for running the augmented reality demo shown in this video from my previous post: Here are the steps..."

Arun Gupta provides quotes from developers in Rails on GlassFish - "most performant of all", "simpler and just works", "blazing speed": "Here are some quotes about running Rails applications on GlassFishfrom user@jruby mailing list: 1) I find the glassfish gem to be the most performant of all -- and I don't need to war-up my app. 2) I also have some mongrel cluster stuff, but glassfish is simpler and just works. 3) Voila...blazing speed, can handle lots of traffic..."


In today's Weblogs, David Walend writes about Event Based Programming in JavaFX: "I decided to try my hand at some JavaFX programming to see what the language had to offer. Two of the key features of JavaFX are its ability to bind to data, and its access to all Java libraries. I used that to see how it handles for event-based programming. I built this minesweeper game, enjoyed using bind and on replace, and found myself wishing for more."

Carol McDonald recaps her June events in 2 JavaOne Hands On Labs , Sun Technology Exchange, Java Technology Day Israel, and Java Day Turkey: "I had a very busy June, I gave two Hands on Labs at JavaOne, two sessions at the Sun Technology Exchange, three sessions at Java Technology Day in Tel Aviv Israel, and one session at Java Day in Istanbul Turkey."

And Harold Carr announces My CommunityOne 2009 presentation is online: "My CommunityOne 2009 presentation is now available online: 'S305138: Metro Web Services, NetBeans IDE, GlassFish Application Server, and OpenSSO in Action with Amazon WS, Azure, and Office'"


In the Forums,pccontact has a question about Glassfish Performance??: "Dear all, I have a SOAP application which doing some work takes about 1-4 secs to complete then response back to client. and the request and reply SOAP size is about 10K bytes long. My Glassfish is on a Q8200 4 core CPU with 4GB RAM on Cent OS 5.3. I use Threads.Sleep(1000) to simulate the process. The glassfish only can response 500 TPS(response per second back to client). I used SOAP UI to open 1024 threads(actually, 512-1024 get almost the same response TPS) for concurrent requests. If I use Threads.Sleep(2000) then the response only about half 250 TPS..."

wasedaxiao is seeing an open jdk7 build error: "I am building open jdk 7 on my Vista PC. Although I found j2sdk-image was successfully generated(I can launch java, javac under it) but the terminal prompot output the following errors. Could some please point where the problem exists? Constructing Javadoc information... ..\..\..\..\src\share\classes\javax\swing\JTabbedPane.java:651: cannot find symbol @Transient..."

And klauern asks if it's Possible to set http listener with web application at / context?: "I've been banging my head against this problem, so I thought before I start making too many changes or add any more frustration, I should ask whether it is even possible. I have a Glassfish V3 Prelude server set up on our environment that is listening on port 8070. Specific to this, I have deployed Hudson to it at context /hudson. So, the Hudson application can be reached at: http://localhost:8070/hudson Is it possible to set a specific http listener to be dedicated to only one web application?..."


The current Spotlightis the Christine Montilla Dorffi's article "2009 JavaOne Conference Wrap-Up: A Solid Show": 'The JavaOne conference is the kind of event where the declaration "Classpath is dead!" causes hundreds of people to applaud soundly and hoot their approval. We're talking hardcore, middleware-loving, certified-geeky Javaheads coming together to share their love of -- and frustrations over -- the Java programming language and platform, and the extended technology that it informs...'


The new java.net Poll asks "Have you tried out NetBeans Version 6.7?". The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include a new article by John Ferguson Smart, Grails and Continuous Integration: An Essential Combo, which shows how to set up a Continuous Integration (CI) build job to compile and test your Grails application in Hudson, for automated continuous integration. We're also featuring Felipe Gaucho's article, Exposing Domain Models through the RESTful Service Interface, Part 1, which describes domain models and demonstrates how to create a generic CRUD application.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 81: JTDF, in which Eric Areseneau talks about Victor D'yakov talks about the new Java Device Testing Framework project in the Mobile & Embedded Community. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



This past week's java.net poll on the Java technologies job market implies that the global economic downturn is far from over...  

Have you ever thought about starting a Java User Group? Matt Stine spoke with me at JavaOne about his experiences with starting and growing the Memphis/Mid-South Java User Groupin a java.net Community Corner podcast titled JUG Leadership: Lessons Learned. Go to Matt's blog to get theslides so you can follow along as you listen to the podcast.

Matt works at St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. He started the Memphis/Mid-South JUG in 2007. The JUG reaches out to three states: Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi. Matt started the JUG soon after JavaOne 2007. He put up a web site, and serendipitously the JUG's biggest sponsor saw the web site and expressed interest in providing support almost immediately. Carol McDonaldalso found out about the new JUG and came in to speak early on.

So, Matt doesn't feel like it was all his doing that the JUG got off to a strong start. But keeping the group going is something I think he can take a lot of credit for. He had the experience of belonging to a JUG in the 1990s. That JUG did not continue, so Matt was quite aware that there's more to keeping a JUG going than just creating it.

Matt's two years of experience with founding and growing the Memphis/Mid-South JUG led to a list of eight key points of advice, the lessons learned that he offers to other JUG leaders and anyone who might be thinking of starting a JUG. I can't go into all the details Matt presented in our almost 26-minute talk in a blog post, but here are Matt's eight focal points for starting and growing a JUG:

  • Web Presence
  • Cultivate Sponsorship
  • Network
  • Grassroots Marketing
  • Encourage Participation
  • Wide Topic Spectrum
  • Never Say No
  • Stay the Course

It was a very interesting interview for me. I'm not a JUG leader, but I do think there are similarities between my role as java.net editor and what a JUG leader tries to accomplish. We're both trying to bring people together and stimulate participation and community that is hopefully beneficial to everyone who participates. In fact, as I sit here writing as I re-listen to the podcast, I find myself wanting to find my local JUG (I'm in rural Northeastern Connecticut, the "Quiet Corner"), schedule a visit, and maybe even give a talk of some type...

It was great to have Matt in for the JUG Leadership: Lessons Learned podcast. I learned a lot, and I think anyone who is considering starting a JUG or who currently leads a JUG will come away with valuable information from listening to the podcast.

You can find all the 2009 java.net Community Corner podcasts on our JavaOne Community Corner Podcast page.


In Java Today, In The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study, In this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, educator, author, and Java Champion Paul Dietel presents an overview of "The ATM Object-Oriented Design and Implementation Case Study"from his book "Java: How to Program." Paul describes the presentation like this: "A key concept in object-oriented programming is the interactions among objects. Most programming textbooks show code examples that create and use one or two objects to demonstrate specific features of the language. In addition to small examples like these, our textbook Java How to Program, 8/e (published March 2009) presents an object-oriented design/UML 2 automated teller machine (ATM) case study and its complete code implementation. This ATM case study is a nice business example that students can relate to..."



In this java.net Community Corner 2009 podcast, Matt Stine talks about JUG Leadership: Lessons Learned.



Peligri reports on Hudson Growth - Plugins, Jobs, Eclipse: "Hudson continues to show very nice growth; This post reports on three different indicators..."

 

In today's Weblogs, Greg Brown reports on What is new with Pivot?: "Discusses some aspects of the forthcoming Apache Pivot 1.3 release."

Rémi Forax reports on the JSR292 backport - First release: "First release of JSR292 backport. You can now test invokedynamic with your old :) JDK (1.5 or 1.6)."

And Kumar Jayanti writes about Attaching Security Policies to Individual Operations: "Securing individual operations of a WebService differently by attaching policies at the operation scope."bugs found out-of-the-blue, that could very well be cause serious problems."


In the Forums,singhabhi23 asks about SUNONE APP Server 8.2 and JMX MBeanServer: "Hi All, Can any one tell me how SUNONE console and MBeanServer is related to each other. In my application I'm creating MBeanServer. This MBean Server is breaking communication between SUNONE console and nodes. If I remove my app then SUNONE console shows node is running fine but if I start my app then SUNONE console shows node is not running but I checked it is running fine..."

zai87 has a problem: NEED HELP!! how to Display IMEI number on Java ME emulator device: "Hi all.. i'm doing my final project for my degree.. the problem that i face is about displaying an IMEI number on Java ME emulator device. i found the code from http://www.java-forums.org. but its not working though i have change some values inside System.getProperty does anyone have an idea on this? your help will be highly appreciated dude.. thanks a lot below is the code: import javax.microedition.lcdui.*; import javax.microedition.midlet.*; ..."

And Chris Dumoulin is getting an Invalid user or password after undeploy: "I'm running GlassFish Enterprise Server v2.1. I've been using it to run OpenSSO 8.1. I'm able to login to the GlassFish administration console no problem, and am able to use asadmin to start/stop the domain and perform command line configuration. However, any time I undeploy OpenSSO from the admin console, afterward I'm not able to log back in to the admin console until I restart GlassFish. Also, I'm not able to undeploy using asadmin; I'm able to successfully use asadmin for many other things, but when I try to use "undeploy", I get "Invalid user or password"..."


The current Spotlightis the Christine Montilla Dorffi's article "2009 JavaOne Conference Wrap-Up: A Solid Show": 'The JavaOne conference is the kind of event where the declaration "Classpath is dead!" causes hundreds of people to applaud soundly and hoot their approval. We're talking hardcore, middleware-loving, certified-geeky Javaheads coming together to share their love of -- and frustrations over -- the Java programming language and platform, and the extended technology that it informs...'


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's the current status of the Java technologies employment market?". Today is the last full day for the poll.


Our Feature Articles include a new article by John Ferguson Smart, Grails and Continuous Integration: An Essential Combo, which shows how to set up a Continuous Integration (CI) build job to compile and test your Grails application in Hudson, for automated continuous integration. We're also featuring Felipe Gaucho's article, Exposing Domain Models through the RESTful Service Interface, Part 1, which describes domain models and demonstrates how to create a generic CRUD application.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 81: JTDF, in which Eric Areseneau talks about Victor D'yakov talks about the new Java Device Testing Framework project in the Mobile & Embedded Community. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Have you ever thought about starting a Java User Group? Matt Stine spoke with me at JavaOne about his experiences with starting and growing the Memphis/Mid-South Java User Group in a java.net Community Corner podcast...  

Felipe Gaucho talked about the Premio Universitaro Java (PUJ) competition with Jim Wright in a 16-minute java.netCommunity Corner podcast recorded at JavaOne. PUJ is:

an academic competition to promote the synergy between the academy goals and the market needs. The prize stimulates the students to submit their homework projects to analysis by IT experts - senior professionals who will evaluate the quality and the market adequateness of what the students are coding (the homeworks) in the local universities.

Felipe started the competition within his JUG in Ceara, Brazil as a means of bridging the gap between academia and industry. Each semester computer science students produce and enormous volume of applications. In the contest, the student's applications are submitted to teams that assess the applications. The evaluators include other students, professors, and industry experts.

Felipe considers what students produce as a product, and establishing communication between students and professionals stimulates the students themselves to consider their work in a more professional light. It's an idea that could be implemented by JUGs almost anywhere in the world.

The first year of the competition drew only five applicants -- a small number that had even Felipe wondering if his idea was going to succeed. But the contest drew significant interest from professors and industry professionals.

The second year's competition (which included a first prize of a paid trip to the DEVOXX conference) drew 25 submissions. The competition was intense, with many very high quality applications making it difficult for the judges to determine the winner. The winning application won by a single point over the second place entry.

Students are eagerly anticipating the third annual competition, asking Felipe when it's going to get started. Felipe has now created a PUJ web site. There you can find detailed instructions about the competition, along with a PUJ 2008 video.

Visit the PUJ, a Jug Contest, JavaOne 2009 Podcast page to listen to the complete 16-minute discussion between Felipe and Jim.

You can find the 2009 Community Corner podcasts as they are published (along with the podcasts from previous years) on the JavaOne Community Corner Podcast page.


In Java Today, we're featuring PUJ, a Jug Contest, JavaOne 2009 Podcast, in which Felipe Gaucho tells Jim Wright about the Premio Universitario Java Competition in this java.net Community Corner podcast recorded at JavaOne 2009.

Peligri reports on a study that lets you answer What's the Right GlassFish Release For You?: "Alexis has a nice summary of the different GlassFish releases, explaining how to Choose the Right Release: GlassFish v2.1, GlassFish v3 Prelude or GlassFish v3 Preview. In a nutshell, v2.1 is for production deployments, v3 Preview is a beta for v3 final and v3 Prelude is/was a transitional release..."

And Robilad provides his roundup of Jazoon in his post Conference Roundup: Jazoon 2009: "This year was my first time at Jazoon. It's a conference in central Europe in Zurich, Switzerland, a few weeks after JavaOne and almost 6 months away from Devoxx, the large European Java Event at the end of the year in Antwerp, Belgium. It attracts international speakers, and a diverse European audience. It has continuously grown in attendance..."


In today's Weblogs, Harold Carr tells us My JavaOne 2009 presentations online: "My JavaOne 2009 presentations are now available online."

Arun Gupta presents his FISL 2009 Wrapup - 3 talks, 1 talk show, 14 blogs, 10 videos, 275 pics, 2 GlassFish production stories: "FISL 2009 wrapped up over the weekend. Even though the conference officially ended on Saturday but the connections made there will certainly allow us to continue all the great momentum. The conference celebrates open source and it was certainly great to see Federal Government..."

And Varun Nischal writes about Fixing bugs in RHN v1.x: "RHN v1.0 stands for plug in: Revamped Hyperlink Navigation (version 1.0). This blog would focus on 2 bugs found out-of-the-blue, that could very well be cause serious problems."


In the Forums,technolgia asks about Support For BlackBerry: "Hi, In my application i use the forms setBackCommand() method to map the escape key of blackberry using Thorstons port. In the same way is it possible to map the dialogue's Cancel command to the escape key and dialogue's Ok command to fireclicked? Can someone help me out with this..."

deronj provides a Warning about accessing Swing or AWT objects from inside a commit: "If you are a Wonderland 0.5 developer who uses the App Base, you should be aware that if you try to access a Swing or AWT object from inside a Processor commit method or an EventListener commitEvent method, a deadlock can result. For example, if you try to make a WindowSwing visible from inside a commitEvent or even create an AWT mouse event, the client can deadlock. To avoid this, you should use SwingUtilities.invokeLater..."

And rafik777 wonders about Glassfish+jersey+json+natural convention and new jaxb: "Hi, I want to deploy jersey application on glassfish v3 Preview and I mainly use json provider with natural convention. When I try deploy my app I get error: INFO: Initiating Jersey application, version 'Jersey: 1.1.0-ea 04/30/2009 06:59 PM' SEVERE: [failed to localize] error.jaxb.ri.2.1.10.missing() SEVERE: The provider class, class org.mycompany.core.rs.provider.CommonJaxbProvider, could not be instantiated. Processing will continue but the class will not be utilized
java.lang.RuntimeException: [failed to localize] error.jaxb.ri.2.1.10.missing()
at ..."


The current Spotlightis the Christine Montilla Dorffi's article "2009 JavaOne Conference Wrap-Up: A Solid Show": 'The JavaOne conference is the kind of event where the declaration "Classpath is dead!" causes hundreds of people to applaud soundly and hoot their approval. We're talking hardcore, middleware-loving, certified-geeky Javaheads coming together to share their love of -- and frustrations over -- the Java programming language and platform, and the extended technology that it informs...'


This week's java.net Poll asks "What's the current status of the Java technologies employment market?". Tomorrow (Thursday) is the last full day for the poll.


Our Feature Articles include a new article by John Ferguson Smart, Grails and Continuous Integration: An Essential Combo, which shows how to set up a Continuous Integration (CI) build job to compile and test your Grails application in Hudson, for automated continuous integration. We're also featuring Felipe Gaucho's article, Exposing Domain Models through the RESTful Service Interface, Part 1, which describes domain models and demonstrates how to create a generic CRUD application.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 81: JTDF, in which Eric Areseneau talks about Victor D'yakov talks about the new Java Device Testing Framework project in the Mobile & Embedded Community. OpenJDK Podcast is The latest JavaOne Community Corner Podcast is


--> 

Current and upcoming Java Events :

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.



Felipe Gaucho talked about the Premio Universitaro Java (PUJ) competition with Jim Wright in a 16-minute java.net Community Corner podcast...  

Filter Blog

By date: