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The voting in this past week's poll suggests that the decision by JetBrains to offer a free and open source IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition was a good one. A total of 332 votes were cast, with the following resuts:

Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition?

  • 5% (16 votes) - I use IntelliJ IDEA, but now I'll switch to the Community Edition
  • 6% (20 votes) - I'll switch to IntelliJ IDEA, now that it's free and open source
  • 34% (112 votes) - I'll probably try it out
  • 40% (134 votes) - No, I prefer another IDE
  • 11% (35 votes) - No, I'll stick with the fully supported IntelliJ IDEA
  • 5% (15 votes) - I don't know; other

The normal caveat: this is not a scientific poll, it's merely a survey wherein the voters chose to vote on a voluntary basis, etc. ...

16% of the voters said they use the fully supported version of IntelliJ IDEA; a little less than a third of those developers say they will switch to the Community Edition. However,dhvdev posted a comment addressed to IntelliJ users, advising them to "stick with what you know and avoid the community edition for web":

The Community Edition looks very familiar for those using the Commercial edition, with a few graphical color changes and some features removed. Most of the removed commercial features are for hardcore refactoring, testing, and developing with integrated web servers. The most frustrating removed feature however, is that the "Most Intelligent Java IDE" doesn't know what a Java Server Pages (.jsp) file is ...

Half of the 80% of developers who indicated that they currently use another IDE plan to at least try out the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition, with about 15% of that group saying they have already made up their mind to switch to the Community Edition now that it's free and open source. This latter group was clearly the initial target for JetBrains. Their introductionto the Community Edition states:

We believe IntelliJ IDEA to be the best Java IDE on the market - and the world will only gain if more people start using it. That's why we decided to remove the main barrier - the price tag ...

The price tag is certainly something that blocked me from giving IntelliJ IDEA the attention it probably deserves. When you work significantly on Linux platforms for lots of years, the idea of paying for software starts seeming a bit alien. The idea of contributing to an open source project seems worthy, but the idea of actually spending money for commercial software where there are other high quality free and open source packages??? Hence, my earlier "surprise" that there were actually three "big" Java IDEs, not just two (Eclipse and NetBeans). In my "only free and open source counts" way of looking at the world, there were only two IDEs that mattered.

Of course, in my work in the data center, we employ high scale Sun servers, Solaris, and an Oracle database -- all pretty costly stuff. And I certainly don't think we made the wrong decision there (especially since the data center was designed in the late 1990s, when Linux and open source tools were really at a very different stage of development compared with where they are now).

I my view, it's great that a free and open source version of IntelliJ IDEA is now available. I commend JetBrains on the decision!

New poll: JCP

The new poll was prompted by the fact voting in the 2009 JCP Executive Committee elections will be ending soon. The poll asks "What's your view of the JCP's role in guiding Java's future?"


In Java Today, James Gosling celebrates 40 years of the Internet in The Network Is:

Yet Another Happy Birthday Intertubes!!Today marks 40 years of the internet, although there's some debate as to the actual date. I consider myself a latecomer: I didn't get my first real internet email address until 1977, C410JG40@CMUA. I was "jag" on various Unix systems before then, but it wasn't until 1977 that the ARPAnet and email really took over my life. I soon realized that the only real-world friendships I kept up with were folks that I could send email to...

A few days ago, Binod provided coverage of the new SailFin release in SailFin V2 released!:

SailFin V2 (Sun GlassFish Communications Server 2.0) isreleased today. See Srikanth'sannouncement and Prasad's roadmap entry. A number of new features have been added since we released SailFin V1 in January. These include high availability, rolling upgrade, flexible network topology, better over load protection, improved diagnosability, Java based DCR files for the load balancer etc. Diameter support is also available...

Johan Karlsson has a new article on the Sun Developer Network, titled Powerful Logging in Java ME:

You have just developed your new cool MIDlet, the one that is going to rule the world. It runs like a well oiled machine on the emulator. But when you download and install it on your target device, the MIDlet seems to take ages to start up. Finally, you see the splash screen. Oh no! The MIDlet crashes and you get an error pop-up saying "Application Error," and the MIDlet shuts down. What happened? This is not the way you pictured it. Is there something that shows what really happened behind the scenes? ...

In today's Weblogs, Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein talks about Programming bitmapped graphics with JavaFX:

In my last attempt to stress the JavaFX platform, I ported the Strange Attractor demo/benchmark. Different from JavaFX Balls, this is not scenegraph-driven animation, but old-school "pixel by pixel" drawing

The current JCP Executive Committee Election ends at midnight Pacific Standard Time (PST, GMT-8) on Monday, November 2. JCP members can vote by visiting the eballot site. The current election includes the Standard/Enterprise (SE/EE) Executive Committee and the Micro Edition (ME) Executive Committee. In each case, both ratified and elected seats are on the ballot.

I myself am not among the almost 1000 members of the JCP, so I decided to do some investigation into how JCP elections work. For example, what's the meaning of a "ratified" seat versus an "elected" seat? The JCP Executive Committee Elections page provides some good background on all of this. The election to "ratified" seats are controlled by the Program Management Office (PMO):

The PMO nominates Members to fill the vacant Ratified Seats with due regard for balanced community and regional representation.

Meanwhile, any JCP member can run for election for one of the "elected" seats.

In the current election, Doug Lea, Fujitsu, HP, IBM, and Oracle are up for ratification for the SE/EE Executive Comittee; and AT&T, Siemens, SK Telecom, T-Mobile, and Vodafone are up for ratification for the ME Executive Committee. To be ratified, a candidate must receive a majority of the vote. Historically, the ratification seat elections are not close. For example, in last year's election, the lowest approval percent for a ratification seat was 77.2% (for SAP).

For elected seats, a JCP member has to be nominated (you're allowed to nominate yourself). Any member who accepts the nomination must file a qualification statement (up to 200 words), a position paper, a bio of the primary contact, and a photo of the primary contact.

The Qualification Statement is a brief (200 words) description of your qualifications for an EC seat. It is a Qualification Statement for the Corporation you represent (or for the individual if it is an Individual Member). It should include the value and perspective you would bring to the EC, your interests in the JCP program, as well as a summary of your current participation in the JCP program (overall)--JSRs led, participation on Expert Groups, meetings/events attended, etc. This information will appear on the ballot and will convince community members whether they should vote for you, so please include relevant information about your experience within the JCP program and your investments in Java technology.

For the elected seats, JCP members cast as many votes as the number of open seats. The candidates who receive the most votes win the seats.

Hence, for elected seats, a candidate can receive less than 50% of the vote and still be elected. For example, last year there were four candidates for one open SE/EE Executive Committee seat, and Intel Corp. won the seat with 46.4% of the vote. For the ME Executive Committee, there were three candidates last year running for two open seats. I'm not sure how the JCP computes its vote percentages in this case (I would have thought the total would add up to 200% since the voters were said to have cast two votes) -- anyway, the posted results for last year show the winning candidates having received less than 50% of the vote. It looks like they divide the total number of votes each candidate receives by the number of open seats, so their total adds up to 100%. If that's the case case, then in last year's election, 90.2% of voters selected Sony Ericcson as one of their two choices for an elected seat.

I did expect the procedures for election to the JCP Election Committee to be a bit arcane -- that's almost required to ensure the stability, balance, continuity, and fairness of process that must be implicit for a standards organization.

One thing I think I can predict about this year's election: Jacob Feldman will be elected to the Micro Edition Executive Committee (he appears to be the only candidate)!


In Java Today, Terrence Barr announces the 10/31: Mobile App Conference in Bangalore:

This weekend SiliconIndia brings the Mobile Application Conference India to Bangalore. Sun is a conference sponsor and we are preparing a bunch of content and information around Sun's technologies and programs such as the JavaFX Partner Program, the Java ME SDK 3.0, latest JavaFX applications and tools, and the Java Store...

Kirill Grouchnikov demonstrates Comboboxes in Substance 6.0:

One of the items on the roadmap for version 6.0 of Substance look-and-feel(code-named Sonoma) is to polish the appearance of existing components. Today i'm going to talk about visual enhancements done for the comboboxes in the latest 6.0dev drop of the library...

Heather VanCura Chilson reminded me that the JCP Election Ballot is OPEN , but only for a few more days:

The 2009 JCP Executive Committee (EC) Elections have arrived. The ballot is currently open until midnight (pacific time) on Monday 2 November. The primary contact for JCP program members are eligible to vote (one vote per member, individual Members are their own primary contact). Please take this opportunity to influence the members on the EC by participating in the election...

In today's Weblogs, Bhavani Shankar presents a SailFin HA FAQ (Tips 'n' Tricks of SailFin High Availability):

This blog answers some of the commonly asked questions about SailFin HA

[Note : my-app, my-node-agent, my-cluster, my-instance are the names I used, feel free to choose the names of your choice]

What is the minimum requirement to use high availability in SailFin:

You need to have a SailFin cluster with at least 2 instances.

How to enable high availability for an application? ...

Binod presents a tutorial on Writing your first IM server using SailFin CAFE:

In this edition, I am explaining, how to write a simple IM server using SailFin CAFE. If you have read my earlier blogs onSailFin CAFE (here and here) then there is nothing additional need to be done!. The same applications that supports 2-party calls or Conference application are already capable of handling IM between two users...

And Kito D. Mann announces that the Final JSF Summit Early Bird Deadline Ends Nov 2nd:

If you're thinking about attending the JSF Summit this December, now is the time to act. You can save $200 if you register before the final early bird deadline this coming Monday, Nov 2nd. The expert speaker lineup includes Ed Burns, Dan Allen, Neil Griffin, Stan Silvert, Matthias Wessendorf, Martin Marinsheck, Pete Muir, David Geary, Ted Goddard, and many more. We've got over 35 expert sessions covering all facets of JSF and Seam development...

In the Forums,abadjiev wonders does glassfish v3 supports clustering: "Hi, I saw few questions on that topic, but I can see clear information about whether glassfish v3 supports clustering. I believe that I'm not the only one which is interested about this and depending on answer will decide whether to include v3..."

gabox01 needs to Keep focus on element: "Hi, I have a huge dataTable, with an inputText component at every cell. When i click away from any of these components, i want to update the others. That part is working fine. except, that the focus is removed from the selected..."

And aliatis asks What's the class that moves avatar?: "I'm sorry for ask too many questions. I'm trying to do a bot in PW. My idea is move an avatar automatically but I don't find the class that moves the avatar. Where is it?."


Our current Spotlightis NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta Available for Download!: The NetBeans team is pleased to announce the availability of NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta. NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta is the first IDE to offer support for the entire Java EE 6 spec. Highlights include support for JSF 2.0/Facelets, Java Persistence 2.0, EJB 3.1 including using EJBs in web applications, RESTful web services, and GlassFish v3. The IDE's integration with Project Kenai, a collaborative environment for hosting open-source projects, now offers full support for JIRA and improved instant messenger and issue tracker integration. PHP support has been extended to include the Symfony framework and PHP 5.3. The release also supports the JavaFX SDK 1.2.1 ...


The current java.net Poll asks Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our current "(Not So) Stupid Questions" topic for discussion isDoes Java Speak for Itself? It was suggested at Oracle OpenWorld that Java indeed does speak for itself. But, what does that statement mean? Does it have any truth? Register your view by posting a comment.

Our Feature Articles include my recent Interview: Andr

As I write this, I'm following the end of TheServerSide Java Symposium in Prague, Czech Republic. The Java Tools Community is there,tweeting away, and I'm also following the twitter #TSSJS search feed. The conference is winding down, with several people on the search feed announcing that they have to skip the last session in order to catch the last flights out for the day.

I myself have never done much tweeting. Writing in chunks of 140 or fewer characters seems almost strange to me. And indeed, when you put something like the #TSSJS search feed up on your screen, it's a bit like being in a room with a crowd of people all chattering away. I suppose that does give you a bit of the feel of actually being at a conference -- but it certainly doesn't help all that much if your objective is to take away practical information that you can then use in your everyday work.

On the other hand, if you turn to the Java Tools twitter feed, where you're getting ordered messages that follow the progress of a specific talk at the symposium, you can actually learn something. In that case, the tweets come across as a rough outline of the session.

For example, after lunch today the Java Tools tweeter attendedPavel Genevski's "Where's Your I/O?" session. In the tweets from that session, you find out things like:

  • Stream based devices are typically 1.000.000 times slower than RAM, so careful with them.
  • In Java we have java.io and java.nio, nio2 is coming but it does not have many changes regarding how java.nio works.
  • I/O becomes important in Cloud Computing (they might charge for it), distributed services as it involves heavy I/O...
  • so having a Java I/O analysis tool would be very handy.
  • That's why JPicus was born, which is a free tool (soon to be open sourced) to analyse the I/O aspect of Java applications.

Now that's some good, useful tweeting, in my opinion. The important information from the session is conveyed in a sufficiently orderly manner that I'm enticed to go take a look atJPicus.

As I close this post (since I really must get it live), the Java Tools tweeter is attending "Rapid Enterprise System Development with NetKernel", a session given by Peter Rodgers. Over on the #TSSJS feed, I see thattlberglund is also attending the NetKernel session, oddbjornlk is attending "TeamCity - Continuous Integration, Build Management, and Avoiding Broken Builds", and _dagi is tweeting from the Demystifying JPA Frameworks session. These are the last sessions for this year's symposium.

Now that I've tried it, I think I like follwoing conferences / symposia via Twitter, overall. If you want the cacophony and the crowded conference floor feel, the search feed is available. Actually, even that view is useful, since you'll sometimes catch a stray interesting comment from someone who you might want to start following. But more importantly, focused feeds by skilled and diligent tweeters provide a nice outline of the significant events and statements, as they happen.


In Java Today, James Gosling reports that JavaCard 3 hits the streets!:

The JavaCard team have been cranking away. Development on the 3.0 version is finally (almost) finished, and it's pretty amazing. Java Card 3 is available in two Editions. Classic Edition: This is the same as Java Card 2 with some enhancements/bug fixes. It is almost 10 years young and is the most popular platform for the SIM and ID markets. Connected Edition: This is the next generation Java Card technology...

The Java User Groups Community is highlighting JavaFX (with Passion) comes to Mexico! -- Sang Shin Trip Report:

Java Evangelist, Sang Shin recently wrapped up a recent trip to a Mexican University. He was invited by ITESM, Chihuahua campus to teach JavaFX programming to their 3rd/4th year Comp. Sci. students. The event is organized as a yearly "Invite the industry expert " program. Sang noted that Mexican students are quite familiar with Java programming language and NetBeans. Sang delivered content that was mostly based on: "JavaFX programming (with Passion!)" (which is free). Sang covered all 16 JavaFX topics during his 5-day stay...

The Java Tools Community is covering TheServerSide Java Symposium via Twitter (twitter.com/javatools). Entries from the first day of the symposium include coverage of some talks by Kirk Pepperdine. Here are a few tweets:

  • When tuning, one has to look at the whole systm, not just at the code. Anything can slow down our app.
  • For a benchmarking process, we have to start from a baseline and move from that, always making sure we are improving.
  • In order not to get lost with all the data involved, divide and conquer to ananlyse the problem.
  • To reduce the problem: Who is the dominating consumer of resources? the OS, the JVM, the apps, nothing?
  • Who is using the CPU? and if you are not using it fully, what is preventing it from doing it?

In today's Weblogs, Sergey Malenkov writes about his Dodecahedron application:

I've made the decision to participate in the JFXstudio Challenge competition. The subject of the competition isFive. Therefore, I decided to replace the squares with the pentagons in one of my applications. Do you remeber the sample that rotates the cube? ...

Fabrizio Giudici writes about Elmo, a Semantic Entity Manager:

My last post about my use of semantic technologies in my projects dates back to several months ago - it's high time I get on, also taking the chance of a presentation I've held a couple of days ago at the JavaDay Verona. Today I'm going to introduce the products I'm using: OpenSesame and Elmo. Both are produced by Aduna Software and are available at the OpenRDFsite, under the pretty liberal BSD-style license. I'm not going to write a tutorial, of course, as some documentation is available on the website, but rather show a small example.

Jean-Francois Arcand announces Atmosphere 0.4 Released:

Atmosphere 0.4 is out. This release contains many new features and can be seen in action in many well-known frameworks...

In the Forums,michaelmaguire has a question involving Touchscreen: Scroll down in a Menu on phone without up/down buttons?: "At the Symbian Exchange & Exposition in London today, I tried installing our LWUIT-based software on several new phones, including the new SonyEricsson U1i Satio. This phone has a full touchscreen and no navigation buttons. Everything..."

mikezang needs to Modify DefaultListCellRenderer to render Label: "I checked the newest source of LWUIT, I found the DefaultListCellRenderer it not right to render Label component as it didn't render icon in Label.public class..."

And bjbcats is seeing TableLayout issues: "I've tried TableLayout using the snippet of code from http://lwuit.blogspot.com/2009/10/arrange-it-like-table-introducing-table.html, which works well. I've..."


Our current Spotlightis NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta Available for Download!: The NetBeans team is pleased to announce the availability of NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta. NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta is the first IDE to offer support for the entire Java EE 6 spec. Highlights include support for JSF 2.0/Facelets, Java Persistence 2.0, EJB 3.1 including using EJBs in web applications, RESTful web services, and GlassFish v3. The IDE's integration with Project Kenai, a collaborative environment for hosting open-source projects, now offers full support for JIRA and improved instant messenger and issue tracker integration. PHP support has been extended to include the Symfony framework and PHP 5.3. The release also supports the JavaFX SDK 1.2.1 ...


The current java.net Poll asks Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our current "(Not So) Stupid Questions" topic for discussion isDoes Java Speak for Itself? It was suggested at Oracle OpenWorld that Java indeed does speak for itself. But, what does that statement mean? Does it have any truth? Register your view by posting a comment.

Our Feature Articles include my recent Interview: Andr

Back in April, I reported on the National Health Information Network's (NHIN) application of OpenESBas a component of its new software infrastructure. In his Aquarium post yesterday,peligri provided an update on the progress that's being made.

Sun's Bill Vass posted Sun's Open Source Curing Health Care Woes the day after Barack Obama was inaugurated, noting:

The key to any eHealth reform program (no matter the price tag) is to facilitate information sharing across multiple agencies and to eliminate the information silos that exist today, allow the government to reduce costs and errors and to better serve our veterans, senior citizens and disabled.


Figure 1. HIEOS architecture diagram

peligri writes that

Within the HHS, the ONC is the main entity that coordinates these efforts and it just has [chosen] Health Information Exchange Open Source (HIEOS) as a key portion of NHIN Connect. And, HIEOS - developed by Vangent - is using several of our OpenSource components - see Architectural Diagram - including OpenESB and GlassFish, and MySQL.

Can open source save the government money?

peligri added a late note pointing us to Tim O'Reilly's Thoughts on the Whitehouse.gov switch to Drupal. whitehouse.gov is now running on Drupal, on a Red Hat Linux platform, along with Apache and MySQL. While Tim considers the embracement of open source software by government as "a big win for open source," he also has some doubts about whether adopting open source will significantly reduce government spending on IT:

Of course, it's easy to imagine that the use of open source software will slash the government's IT budget. After all, this software is freely downloadable. I have a feeling it's quite a bit more complicated than that.

First off, government has a huge number of special requirements (remember the flap over President Obama's blackberry?) Second, don't underestimate the difficulty of doing business in Washington. Procurement is done through a complex ballet understood by few open source companies. Third, a big IT deployment like this requires coordination between many companies, each providing a piece of the puzzle.

Still, there's nothing quite like integration into systems in the Federal Government to secure an open source project's future. The Federal Government is the biggest customer/user an open source project can find.

Technology procurement protocols: changes coming soon?

Having worked in a government contracting environment for decades (I'm among those who actually have seen the "procurement ballet" up close), I do see some possible issues that may soon arise. Take, for example, GlassFish ESB. This is an open source project, but it receives a lot of support from Sun. A big part of procurement rules is avoiding conflicts of interest, or the appearance of conflicts of interest. For example, I, as a contractor, cannot buy lunch for the government person who contracts with me to do some work.

Consider requests from the government for enhancements to an open source project that receives significant support from a corporation. Now, consider also that corporation bidding for a different contract (for example, to provide servers to a government agency). If the corporation quickly brings the government's requested enhancements to the top of the list, and provides extra development resources to get those changes completed as soon as possible, while at the same time it is bidding for a contract to sell hardware to perhaps the same agency -- isn't that going to give the appearance of a conflict of interest? That could be construed as giving someone in government quite a big free lunch.

So, while it's great that government is beginning to adopt open source software, I think there are some issues, involving the interaction between corporations that support open source projects and also seek to sell servers or other technology to the government, that are going to have to be worked out somewhere down the line. The government's adoption of open source software ultimately necessitates a new set of technology procurement protocols. Until these protocols are in place, open source is open to being perceived by some as a tool that corporations can use to game the government technology procurement process.


In Java Today,peligri reports on NHIN Connect Using GlassFish and OpenESB:

The importance of information exchange in Health Care will continue to grow and the Federal Goverment has several projects to improve it, while also trying to reduce costs. And, as Bill wrote earlier in the year, Sun's Open Source has been actively engaged in this. Added - Just noticed Tim O'Reilly's note on WhiteHouse.GOV's stack. They use MySQL, Drupal and Apache...

Geertjan Wielenga interviews Peter Rogge in Interview: Help for Multilingual NetBeans Platform Applications:

Peter Rogge ... from Germany is yet another developer of NetBeans Platform applications. He's particularly interested in finding generalized solutions for the challenges faced by developers of multilingual applications. Below you find out about him and the projects he's working on around multilingual support for NetBeans Platform applications...

The mediastreamsplayer project has released Media Streams Player 1.0.0 Beta for Windows Installer:

Aalhaamdulillah! The very first Beta version of Media Streams Player is released! You can use the very first Beta version of Media Streams Player for Windows just Downloading & Installing the following Executable: Media Streams Player 1.0.0 Beta for Windows Installer. This Beta version of Media Streams Player is a stable one. I hope End Users of this software will enjoy this version of Media Streams Player. It is notified that there will be no Linux & Solaris version of this Beta released. Insha Allah users of Linux & Solaris will be able to use the software from the very first Basic version which will come soon. So stay tuned!

In today's Weblogs, Henry Story invites people to Come to the Free Social Web Camp in Santa Clara on Nov 2nd!:

The W3C Social Web Incubator Group is organizing a free Bar Camp in the Santa Clara Sun Campus on November 2nd to foster a wide ranging discussion on the issues required to build the global Social Web. Imagine a world where everybody could participate easily in a distributed yet secure Social Web. In such a world every one will be able to control their own information, and every business would be able to enter into a conversation with customers, researchers, government agencies and partners as easily as they can now start a conversation with someone on Facebook. What is needed to go in the direction of The Internet of Subjects Manifesto? What existing technologies can we build on? What is missing? ...

Fabrizio Giudici talks about Getting rid of MVC:

A few days ago I started a series of post about one of the idioms I'm using with my NetBeans Platform projects, which is the "Pluggable TopComponent". It is the result of a few months of design exercises started with MVC. As I mentioned in my first post, in the meantime some interesting stuff has been published about DCI, a pattern that sports better properties than MVC, in particular a post by Yarda Tulach specifically focused on NetBeans Platform and DCI. At the moment of writing my first posts of the series, I had the feeling that I was using a sort-of DCI, but I wasn't sure. Thankfully, Antonio Vieiro posted another insight of DCI and the Platform, which confirmed by impression...

Eloi Jr. talks about the DateField for LWUIT that he's using in the Tranquiera project:

Yes, there is a DateField component for LWUIT and it is ready for use! It is localized too! It was created by Marlon Luz from IndT, Manaus, Brazil, and the Tranqueira Project is using it. With this DateField it is very easy to configure date formats and check for a valid day, month and year and fix these values, if there is something wrong with them. Because I guess it is not interesting to show the input mode ("123") for this component, I decided to unable this resource on Tranqueira Project. DateField is using a great characteristics of LWUIT: its similarity with Swing...

In the Forums,ran666 has a discovery problem: "Hello, I am running on the same machine(WinXP) two peers: DiscoveryServer and DiscoveryClient from "JXSE Programmers Guide 2.5 Tutorial Code". JXTA starts. But peers can't discover each other. I receive in a console ..."

kleopatra asks about Beansbinding: binding to radio/button/group anybody?: "might overlook something - but seems to be missing ... anybody has such a beast on-hold and like to contribute? Need it in the demos and too lazy to do it myself (plus I faintly remember there were issues last time I tried, half-heartedly)..."

elzahr is having problems with Signing message with certificate: JCE, IAIK or similar in IBM SDK 5.0: "So, I'm in a very difficult problem. Using Java: I've an enterprise certificate (in .p12 format) altogether with its public key ("password" string). Also I've a text message which I've to sign in PKCS7 format. I've been reading a..."


Our current Spotlightis NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta Available for Download!: The NetBeans team is pleased to announce the availability of NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta. NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta is the first IDE to offer support for the entire Java EE 6 spec. Highlights include support for JSF 2.0/Facelets, Java Persistence 2.0, EJB 3.1 including using EJBs in web applications, RESTful web services, and GlassFish v3. The IDE's integration with Project Kenai, a collaborative environment for hosting open-source projects, now offers full support for JIRA and improved instant messenger and issue tracker integration. PHP support has been extended to include the Symfony framework and PHP 5.3. The release also supports the JavaFX SDK 1.2.1 ...


The current java.net Poll asks Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our current "(Not So) Stupid Questions" topic for discussion isDoes Java Speak for Itself? It was suggested at Oracle OpenWorld that Java indeed does speak for itself. But, what does that statement mean? Does it have any truth? Register your view by posting a comment.

Our Feature Articles include my recent Interview: Andr

The Netbeans team has announced that NetBeans 6.8 Beta is now available for download. Highlights of the release include:

support for JSF 2.0/Facelets, Java Persistence 2.0, EJB 3.1 including using EJBs in web applications, RESTful web services, and GlassFish v3. The IDE's integration with Project Kenai, a collaborative environment for hosting open-source projects, now offers full support for JIRA and improved instant messenger and issue tracker integration. PHP support has been extended to include the Symfony framework and PHP 5.3. The release also supports the JavaFX SDK 1.2.1, and comes with added features to the IDE's Maven and database integration, and improvements to the editor and tools for Ruby, Groovy, and C/C++ projects. NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta is available in English, Brazilian Portuguese, Japanese and Simplified Chinese, as well as in several community-translated languages.

Writing about the earlier M2 version of NetBeans 6.8, Adam Biennotedthat "you can actually develop a whole Java EE 6 application without any XML (no ejb-jar.xml, no application.xml no faces-config.xml) - except the persistence.xml." He also said that "NetBeans 6.8m2 is already surprisingly stable. I used the development build of NetBeans 6.8 in a workshop last week and it worked without major problems on different operating systems." So, we can expect the Beta to be even more stable.

Elliott Rusty Harold commentedthat the new release "looks good," but he also thinks that "Netbeans is going to have an even harder time making headway now that IntelliJ is open source too."

You can learn more about NetBeans IDE 6.8 and download the Beta, or read the full announcement.


In Java Today,robilad provides an OpenJDK roundup.

Joe Darcy announcedearlier this week that the OpenJDK 6 build 17 source bundles have been published, with updated build documentation for developers eager to build their own bits. Joe also postedthe regression test results for build 17 on Linux, with more then 50 new passing tests. Andrew Hughes took care of updating IcedTea6 to use build 17, allowing a few dozen of the accumulated patches to be retired as they have made their way into OpenJDK 6 build 17, thanks to the merging work by Joe, Andrew, and others...

Kirill Grouchnikov writes about the Enhanced ribbon application menu in Flamingo 4.2:

Flamingo component suite provides a pure Swing implementation of Office 2007 ribbon component, and the latest 4.2dev drop of the core library has enhanced the support for ribbon application menu to provide default content of the secondary menu panel ...

Geertjan Wielenga (not one to leave a corpse uncovered, especially during Halloween season, and if NetBeans is investigating it) has discovered Rat Brain Analysis on the NetBeans Platform:

A famous man once said: "If your framework can't let you analyze rat brains, then it isn't really a framework." ... OK. No one ever said that. Nevertheless, since it's Friday, the YANPA of the day needs to be slightly off the wall, so here it is...

In today's Weblogs, Felipe Gaucho writes about JPA Join Table with additional state:

JPA has its puzzles and from time to time it is useful to write down that tricky solution for our mapping needs.This entry describes a ManyToMany relationship with an additional state in the intermediate table. All my examples are related to the Arena-PUJ project, the pet project I am hard working nowadays. Arena is an online system to manage academic competitions, and within its several tables and mappings, there is a corner case I will explain below. forts, let me define the entities and its relationship for modeling the data of the Institutions X Competition relationship...

Jim Driscoll announces Mojarra 2.0.1 has shipped:

Just a short post to note that we've now shipped Mojarra 2.0.1. This version fixes a very serious bug when running on Tomcat. You can pick up the files from the usual places, see the release notes for more information...

And Marc Hadley announces WADL Submitted to W3C:

For those of you who've been patiently waiting for WADL to be submitted to a standards organization, I'm pleased to announce that WADL is now a W3C Member Submission. The specification submitted to the W3C is a reformatted version of the draft update I blogged about here. If you already switched to that version then you are current. If not, now would be a good time to think about updating to the latest grammar, the changesare fairly minimal but did require a new namespace since they were not backwards compatible.

In the Forums,ieising asks HowTo: Enforce NB to start GFv2.1 on OS X using localhost?: "Hi, This is something I only see on my Mac. When I start a session of GFv2.1 from NB while connected to a network, the IP address used is the IP adress my Mac has in the network, eg 10.16.37.199 where I want it to just use localhost or..."

aimran50 has a problem where Peers fail to communicate after some time: "I have two edge peers behind different firewalls connecting via a RDV+RLY node that has a public IP. The edge peers use the default edge configuration but with TCP & multicast disabled[their firewall blocks them]: ..."

myinstinct is seeing a weird issue with form not updating: "this one is driving me crazy. form A has a button that creates and invokes form B. Form B has a button that creates and invokes form C. I have a lastShown variable of type Form. I have a running thread that calls an update..."


Our current Spotlightis NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta Available for Download!: The NetBeans team is pleased to announce the availability of NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta. NetBeans IDE 6.8 Beta is the first IDE to offer support for the entire Java EE 6 spec. Highlights include support for JSF 2.0/Facelets, Java Persistence 2.0, EJB 3.1 including using EJBs in web applications, RESTful web services, and GlassFish v3. The IDE's integration with Project Kenai, a collaborative environment for hosting open-source projects, now offers full support for JIRA and improved instant messenger and issue tracker integration. PHP support has been extended to include the Symfony framework and PHP 5.3. The release also supports the JavaFX SDK 1.2.1 ...


The current java.net Poll asks Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our current "(Not So) Stupid Questions" topic for discussion isDoes Java Speak for Itself? It was suggested at Oracle OpenWorld that Java indeed does speak for itself. But, what does that statement mean? Does it have any truth? Register your view by posting a comment.

Our Feature Articles include my recent Interview: Andr

The results of this past weeks poll reflect the uncertainty of the Java community regarding the impact of Oracle's acquisition of Sun. The poll drew a total of 394 votes. The exact question and results were as follows:

Is Oracle good for Java?

  • 21% (81 votes) - Yes, Oracle recognizes Java's importance
  • 22% (88 votes) - Probably, but it will require adaptation by Oracle
  • 32% (126 votes) - I have my doubts
  • 9% (36 votes) - No, Oracle doesn't understand Java
  • 15% (60 votes) - I don't know
  • 1% (3 votes) - Other

As usual, I'll state the caveat that this is not a scientific poll, the results should not be assumed to be a completely accurate representation of the actual distribution of differing views within the entire population of Java users, the margin of error for any given response option is at least 100%, etc.

To me, the most interesting number is the low value for the most negative response ("No, Oracle doesn't understand Java"). This says to me that people are definitely keeping an open mind about the impact of the acquisition on Java's future.

A couple days ago, I published a little item, Does Java Speak for Itself?, keying off another phrase that was stated at Oracle OpenWorld, and inviting comments from people. There, I quoted two large blogs that represented opposing views on the impact of the acquistion on Java, Bert Ertman's Impressions from Oracle OpenWorld: "Is Oracle good for Java?"and Abdelmonaim Renami's Oracle/Sun Merger: A Community Perspective. Bert is more of the view that Oracle really doesn't "get it" when it comes to Java, they view it as a "product". Meanwhile, Abdelmonaim thinks Java is already beyond a single company's control, it already has a life of its own that's bigger than anything that could result from the Oracle acquisition of Sun.

It seems to me that our poll result suggests that, while there is some doubt on whether Oracle will actually be a boon to Java, not that many people expect a strongly negative outcome due to the acquisition. In fact, 43% expect a positive outcome, ultimately.

The greater mystery, in my view, is what will happen with respect to the many open source projects that apply Java technology that receive extensive support from Sun. I mean projects like GlassFish, for example. Is Oracle going to demand cuts in those budget items?

New poll: IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition

A few weeks ago, I was surprised by the very strong response of IntelliJ IDEA users to the fact that I did not explicitly include an Intellij IDEA option in the Which IDE do you use? poll. I explicitly named only NetBeans and Eclipse, and that was considered a major slight to IntelliJ IDEA. Now that IntelliJ has released the free and open source IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition, I realize that part of the reason why I didn't have an IntelliJ IDEA option in the poll was that at that time IntelliJ IDEA was entirely a commercial product. By nature, I tend to focus on open source, and so, the drawback that IntelliJ IDEA was not free and open source influenced my creation of the poll options.

But now the free and open source IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition exists. As IntelliJ says, "we decided to remove the main barrier -- the price tag." Good move, IMO!

So, the new poll asks Do you plan to use the new IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition?Voting will run through next Thursday.


In Java Today, Janice Heiss told me about A Java Developer's Quiz: Part Three. The quiz "invites Java developers to test their knowledge and get an update on recent developments in Java technology." The quiz consists of eleven quite challenging questions. You'll have a better chance at doing well if you've been following the latest Java developments and the commentary that those developments have provoked from prominent people in the Java community.I took the quiz myself. On one of the questions where I guessed, I was quite surprised to find out the correct answer. I don't know what a passing grade is, but maybe I passed!

The Java ME SDK Team Blog repors that Early Access for Mac OS is ready:

Mac developers have often asked when Java ME SDK 3.0 will be available for their operating system. We always answered that we were working on it. Today is the day when it happened, we have released Java ME SDK 3.0 Early Access for Mac OS. You can download it from http://java.sun.com/javame/downloads/sdk30.jsp...

Kirill Grouchnikov is hard at work Extending the Flamingo command buttons:

The command button component is a central building block for the Flamingo component suite. It aims to address the deficiencies of the core Swing button components, adding features expected by the modern applications. While the main goal of Flamingo is to provide a pure Java implementation of the Office 2007 ribbon container, the command buttons can certainly be used outside the ribbon...

In today's Weblogs, Terrence Barr sees the MySQL discussion heating up:

After the open letter by former MySQL CEO M

John Ferguson Smart's new java.net article and his latest blog post both investigate aspects of the upcoming Version 3 of Apache Maven. Maven, in case you're not familiar with it, is a "software project management and comprehension tool." At the core of Maven's application to a specific software project is the project object model (POM). The POM file provides information on the basic structure of the project, and enables Maven to manage a project's build, reporting, and documentation. It's all about automating tasks that once required a lot of repetitious keystrokes by developers, QA teams, and others.

If you read John's writings on java.net and elsewhere, it's readily apparent that automating the processes of developing, building, and testing software are high on his list of concerns. In fact, professionally, he spends a lot of his time training and mentoring companies on agile development and software lifecycle management. Given this background, it's no surprise that Maven is among John's interests.

Last week we published John's article, "Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1". This article outlines and demonstrates many new features in NetBeans 6.7.1 that facilitate working with Maven. Subtopics in the article include:

  • Creating a Maven project in NetBeans
  • Working with your Maven project
  • Managing the Pom file
  • Managing Dependencies

In his latest blog post, Writing your pom files in Groovy - a sneek preview of Maven 3's polyglot features, John talks about the new Maven 3 feature where your POM file doesn't have to be written in the historical XML format. In the post, John demonstrates how you could write a POM file in Groovy. He notes, however, that Maven 3 is expected to support writing POM files in other scripting languages as well.

One interesting item in the new Maven is thetranslator tool. This tool will translate your existing XML POM files into a different language, for example, Groovy:

$ translator pom.xml pom.groovy

John closes his blog post with:

I've just scratched the surface of Maven 3 Groovy support, but hopefully this will give you some idea of what it's all about. In the coming weeks, I'll write about some of the other new features in Maven 3.

I look forward to reading those posts!


In Java Today, the java.net Mobile and Embedded Community is featuring the story Mixins in JavaFX 1.2 Technology:

With the release of version 1.2 of JavaFX technology, developers have a new style of class inheritance: a mixin. A mixin is a type of class that can be inherited by a subclass, but it is not meant for instantiation. In this manner, mixins are similar to interfaces in the Java programming language. However, the difference is that mixins may actually define method bodies and class variables in addition to constants and method signatures...

The java.net NetBeans Community is featuring a news item on OSUM: OSUM Hosts Global NetBeans Demo Fest!:

For the month of October, the OSUM (the Open Source University Meetup) Community is celebrating NetBeans technology by hosting tech demos of the IDE around the world! OSUM is a global network of student developers and on-campus clubs. Membership in OSUM gives students access to free technology training, on-campus events, and tons of free student resources to help them grow as developers and widen their career opportunities. Are you a student or an educator? You can join OSUM and participate in the community's month-long NetBeans Demo Fest by visiting the OSUM site, locating your school's OSUM group, and finding scheduled demo events. Gather your developer friends or students and watch (or show) cool demos of the NetBeans IDE in action...

peligri announces Now Playing, Kohsuke! Recording of Hudson Webinar Now Available:

Kohsuke's Webinar on Hudson last week was a success; it was very well attended and had Great Reviews, and it is now Available for Replay (free, but requires registration). If you are interested in the topic, also check the Hudson Whitepaper...

In today's Weblogs, John Ferguson Smart discusses Writing your pom files in Groovy - a sneek preview of Maven 3's polyglot features:

Maven 3 is promising to be the most significant upgrade since the release of Maven 2. While maintaining backward compatibility with existing Maven 2 projects, it introduces a number of powerful and compelling new features, such as a complete rewrite of the internal architecture, OSGi support and multi-language pom files. In this article, I will be giving a preview of this last feature. One exciting new feature in Maven 3 is it's ability to work with pom files written in non-XML notations. The Maven core now provides an underlying DSL to access the Maven internals, and write POM files in the language of your choice...

Joshua Marinacci introduces My new blog:

As many of you may know, user interface design is a passion of mine. I want software that both looks pretty and acts well. I've had lots of ideas on the topic, often bleeding over into art and traditional design, in addition to usability. After thinking about it for a couple of years I've finally decided to create a blog dedicated to the topic: www.joshondesign.com. At Josh On Design I'll be writing on art, design, and usability, but with a twist. There are plenty of design sites that focus on professional designers. My site will focus specifically on design for software engineers...

And Cay Horstmann provides instruction on Monitoring the HTTP Traffic in a JSF Redirect:

I wanted to trace exactly what happens when a JSF page uses a redirect. Here are my experiences with the HTTP and TCP/IP monitors in NetBeans and Eclipse, and why I ended up using Wireshark instead. Consider the usual JSF flow. The client makes a GET request for the first page. That's a special case, but from then on everything follows a pattern. The server renders a page containing an HTML form that is to be posted back to the same URL. The client makes a POST, the server navigates to a new page and renders it. The problem is that the browser requested the new page with the old URL, and so the browser bar URL is always one step behind...

In the Forums,pablopina needs information on JMS lookup in clustered environment: "We are trying to deploy our app to a cluster. My app client can't find the JMS resources any more on startup (through @Resource annotaions). Is there a different way of looking up JMS resources when running on cluster? ..."

scottjg needs help regarding ServiceActivity and ActivityEndEvent: "Hi, Does Mobicents send ActivityEndEvent for ServiceActivity when for example service is uninstalled or stoped? I provide method for ServiceStartedEvent and ActivityEndEvent, and additionaly I attache again to ServiceActivity ACI in..."

And matbitty has a Problem using the data-extension.type with graphml and JAXB: "[nobr]My first post, so trying to get everything correct

At Oracle OpenWorld, in a conversation regarding Oracle's acquisition of Sun, it was stated that "Java speaks for itself." This statement has drawn the scrutiny of quite a number of people (along with the question that was displayed during another of the keynotes, "Is Oracle good for Java?").

This week's java.net poll lets you voice your view on Is Oracle good for Java?. The statement "Java speaks for itself" is also worthy of discussion, I think. I expect that a lot of people have different opinions about this. So, to provide a forum for this discussion, I've published a new item titled Does Java Speak for Itself?

Thus far, I've found two cogent expressions of opinion regarding this statement in the blogosphere. The first is contained in Java Champion Bert Ertman's post Impressions from Oracle OpenWorld: "Is Oracle good for Java?". Bert says:

the official statement being made by Sun's Scott McNeally and Oracle's Larry Ellison is: "Java speaks for itself." But does it? In fact, I seriously doubt that it does so within Oracle. So far the people from Oracle that I met express a friendly, almost fatherly interest in Java, but they compare it to integrating the Hyperion Query Language into the Oracle stack. They see Java as just another 'product' from Sun and not as the Java platform and ecosystem that it is. So, if Java is speaking for itself within Oracle, than it's no doubt sending them the wrong message!

Meanwhile, Abdelmonaim Remani, founder of the Chico Java User Group, expresses a different viewpoint in his post Oracle/Sun Merger: A Community Perspective:

In the key note, Larry Ellison, the CEO of Oracle, hit the bull's eye when he was quoted as saying that "Java speaks for itself". I have to admit that many people didn't like his answer and considered it ambiguous and unclear, but a deeper look would reveal that it is, indeed, a well-thought-of statement. Java has truly become in the hand of its community; be it the JCP or the contributors to the OpenJDK project. The decisions about the future of the platform are now made uniformly by literally whoever is interested developing it. Doesn't that mean that it speaks for itself?

It's been a long time since the announcement that Oracle is acquiring Sun (that was in April). And, of course, the acquisition process has blocked all possibility of any public statements regarding Oracle's intentions regarding Java. All we really have is our own speculation and attempts to "read the tea leaves". Still, I think most of us have a view on this.

So, if you'd like to contribute to a discussion on the question "Does Java Speak for Itself?", feel free to visit the page and post a comment.


In Java Today, James Gosling recently found a few moments for real programming, as he discusses in his latest post Map browser on kenai:

I ripped the little demo map browser component out of my Oracle OpenWorld slides and moved it to kenai as a new project called OSMBrowser. Not very polished, more of a starting point for someone motivated to play :-) Thanks to the crew at the Open Street Map project for a nice database and tile server. A Thing of Beauty.

The java.net Java User Groups Community reports on Sang Shin's journey to JRSL09 conference in Santiago, Chile:

Sun Java Evangelist, Sang Shin recently wrapped up a 5 day trip to the JRSL conference in Chile. JRSL09 is community organized conference by open source enthusiasts in South America. Countries (Argentina, Chile, and a few other countries except Brazil) take turns hosting the event. This year's event was attended by ~1100 people. Sang's talks: "Java SE 5, Java SE 6, JDK 7", 3-hour JavaFX workshop (2 hour lecture + 1-hour hands-on lab) [a couple folks currently using Flex, asked me if JavaFX supports "Flex remote object binding(?)" kind of capability. I told them JavaFX supports RESTful Web services API which should suffice for most remote communication needs]; Ruby/JRuby/Rails workshop. Sang, also attended a2-day Mozilla conference ...

Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine offers Proof that Java is still the fasted language and other random thoughts:

A few years back Jack released a newsletter on April 1st that proclaimed Java as the fasted language ever. In that news letter to pointed out "stunning and irrefutable" evidence to support his claim. The email we received in response to that newsletter was simply amazing. We were called all sorts of things by people who some how missed the joke. So it was pretty funny when I clicked through to a blog entry on how to measure Java execution time to see the identical code being used. We'd already demonstrated that this code would run in 0 as in zero milliseconds. But here it is again only this time taking a whopping 3782 milliseconds to complete...

In today's Weblogs, Abdelmonaim Renami introduces his views on the Oracle/Sun Merger: A Community Prospective:

The Oracle Sun take-over stirred a lot of controversy about the future of the Java platform. It is no secret that Oracle's main goal behind the merger is access to Sun's hardware technology. This has been fueled by the ambiguity of statements made by Larry Ellison like "Java speaks for itself". Not much has been said in the last Oracle Open World either. Discussing these speculations is deemed to be fruitless if seen in the light of the nature of the Java platform, the way it evolves, and the way its community is organized around it. This article is based on a first-person account experience in the last Oracle conference, and on open conversation with all concerned parties from the community, Sun, and Oracle. It contrast the relationship Oracle has with their user groups to the way the Java User Group community is, and explores the issues that could rise in the integration process if the relationship between the Java User Groups and their new corporate sponsors is not well-defined...

Jim Driscoll talks about Request aggregation in JSF 2 Ajax:

I've had a few requests for request aggregation, ala RichFaces queues, in JSF 2. This was deliberately not included in JSF 2.0, but it will be considered for JSF 2.1. The reason why is simple - there was simply not very much time, once all the base Ajax work was completed, to add any additional features. However, adding this functionality yourself isn't actually very hard. Here's an example of how...

Java Champion Cay Horstmann reveals Another Small Step for JSF...:

In the relentless fight against configuration boilerplate, JSF and Glassfish have taken yet another small step forward. As of Glassfish v3 build 68, you no longer need to declare the faces-servlet in WEB.XML...

In the Forums,laliluna has a Bean validation localization issue: "Hello, I tested integration of a snapshot from last week with Hibernate Validator 4.0.0.GA. I just added the parameter INTERPRET_EMPTY_STRING_SUBMITTED_VALUES_AS_NULL to integrate it. The validation works fine but there is an issue with the selected..."

ramyamasti is seeing a Wonderland server shutdown: "Hi all, I am running the wonderland server on vista 32bit by building from the source. I would like to know how to shutdown wonderland "cleanly" such that all the shutdown hooks are called. I notice that when I just close the command..."

And yangfeng0404 asks what is lime in phoneme?: "Hi, I am porting phoneme for linux-arm.when I compile javacall,there are some prombles about lime. when I use USE_LIME_LIB=false I success. I don't know what is lime,and whether it will be used later.

some one can help me? thank..."


Our current Spotlightis Interview: Andr

The java.net Java Tools Community has just published the 204th edition of the JavaTools Community Newsletter. Among the lead stories in this issue is the upcoming ServerSide Symposium 2009 in Prague:

JavaTools will be at TheServerSide Symposion this year in order to bring you the latest news. TheServerSide Java Symposium is a 2 day conference with 4 tracks on Frameworks, Architectures, Languages and Tools & Techniques. The conference will be on October 27th-28th in Prague, Czech Republic. JavaTools will send two reporters to cover as much of the conference as possible, so stay tuned for the news! If you want to join us there, be quick, there's only two weeks left to register...

Actually, there's less than a week to register now, since the Symposium takes place next Monday and Tuesday. The symposium sounds quite good. Its focus is addressing the need to make rapid progress on projects within the context of a small budget. The four tracks are designed to "address exactly how you can accelerate your organization's projects for the next 6-18 months":

  • The Frameworkstrack "looks at the variety of frameworks that ease and accelerate the building of applications, application components, and user interfaces."
  • The Architecturetrack "focuses on the structure behind applications, examining different approaches to designing applications that perform and scale, including SOA, REST, messaging, JSON, and OSGi."
  • The Languagetrack "looks into emerging features of the Java language and provides in-depth expert recommendations on the use of Java and complementary languages in daily practice."
  • The Tools and Techniques) track "takes a look at the proliferation of tools available to design and build high-quality applications."

I'll be looking forward to the reporting by the Java Tools Community reporters.

The newsletteralso highlights Apple's fixing of 15 Java-related security holes and a long list of new Java tools that have recently been released. This issue's "Tools Tips" is titled "Packaging your application and its dependencies in a .jar file" and talks about Maven's shade plugin.

On the Java Tools home page, the recent Interview with Sven Reimers, Winner of Duke Award 2009 is highlighted:

Fabrizio Giudici interviews fellow NetBeans Dream Team member Sven Reimers about his Duke Award win and his NetBeans Satellite Tracking System, a desktop app based on the NetBeans Platform.

If that interests you, you might also want to check out the Java Tools SQE Roundtable podcast that I recorded at this year's JavaOne. While that conversation focused primarily on the SQE (Software Quality Environment) project, the conversation naturally included the Duke Award, which had just been announced, and the NetBeans Satellite Tracking System.


In Java Today, James Gosling has posted My slides from Oracle Openworld:

Several folks have asked for copies of my slides from Oracle Openworld. Unfortunately, there's no printable form of them, since I did them as a JavaFX app. You'll find them at http://fxslideshowtest.kenai.comwhich will launch the app (with all it's rather large images) via JNLP. If you're curious about the sources, they're on kenai. The code is pretty ugly: I just slapped it together. I'm not proud :-) The code for the map browsing component is in there too. It uses the tile server from openstreetmap.org (Click and drag with the mouse to move, scroll wheel to zoom). I kinda like the map browsing component, so I'm cleaning up the source and I'll push it out to kenai as a separate project sometime soon....

Ryan Lubke announces that Mojarra 2.0.0 is available!:

Mojarra 2.0.0 is now available! There are several ways to obtain the release.

 

Please review the release notes as there are important details there pertaining to differences between the implementation and the specification as well as a basic migration guide from 1.2 to 2.0 (note that this is a live document, so we'll be making additions - check back regularly)...

Joseph Darcy announced OpenJDK 6: b17 Source Bundle Published:

On October 16, the source bundle for OpenJDK 6 b17 was published. Major changes in this build include the latest round of security fixes and, courtesy of Andrew John Hughes, the syncing of HotSpot 14 into the OpenJDK 6 HotSpot repository. A detailed list of all the changes is also available.

In today's Weblogs, Binod talks about SailFin CAFE: Implementing a simple conference application:

Hope you have read my blog on "Writing your first SailFin CAFE Application". There I explained how to handle a 2-party call using SailFin CAFE. Now lets see how can you write a simple conference application. The application would accept the calls from any participant and if the participant is calling a conference id, then the application should use a media server, handle SDP, mix the voice, apart from handling the necessary SIP signalling. If you are writing such an application with SIP Servlets and JSR 309 Media control API, it would take serveral pages of code like this...

Java Champion Manfred Riem announces a new minicast in Refactor a block of code into a method using NetBeans:

A minicastthat shows you how to refactor a block of code into a method using NetBeans.

Scott Oaks has some Fun With JStack:

Avid readers of the glassfish aliases know that we are frequently asked questions about why their server isn't responding, or why it is slow, or how many requests are being worked on. And the first thing we always say is to look at the jstack output. So you're running on a Sun 5120 with 128 hardware threads and so you have 368 request processing threads and the jstack output is 10K lines. Now what? What I do is use the program attached to this blog entry -- it will parse the jstack output and show how many threads are doing what. At it's simplest, it's something like this...

In the Forums,Florian Poulin is interested in Controlling a webservice client through JMX: "Hello, From a JMX client (written in Groovy) I'd like to "tell" a Webservice client (deployed on Glassfish) to make calls to a Webservice (which is exposed in another project on the same Glassfish). My goal is to use..."

emallin is seeing an AWT-EventQueue Deadlock on Safari 4: "Hi, Since the release of Safari 4, I've had problems on MAC OSX with our Swing application, which includes an embedded JDIC browser. I've been following the thread..."

And darryl_m has a Transaction problem when persisting Entity class: "I have an application with several classes. One class (A) is a message-driven bean. When a message comes into A, it calls a stateless session bean (B), through it's BLocal interface. B has a container-managed PersistenceContext. I have several other..."


Our current Spotlightis the Interview: Andr

This week's java.net Spotlight is an "Interview: Andr

Voters in this past week's poll expect GlassFish to be an important application server for a long time to come. A total of 479 votes were cast. The exact question and results were:

What future do you foresee for GlassFish?

  • 15% (74 votes) - GF will ultimately become the predominate app server
  • 35% (167 votes) - GF will be a major player long term
  • 14% (67 votes) - GF will hold its own
  • 24% (116 votes) - I have doubts about GF's future
  • 11% (55 votes) - I don't know; other

Summing the positive options, 64% of voters believe GlassFish will be viable going forward. Many of the 24% who have doubts about GlassFish's future may be thinking about the Oracle acquisition of Sun. However, no one specifically stated that in a comment.

While GlassFish is an open source project, it clearly receives significant funding and support from Sun. At JavaOne, a large section of the pavilion floor was occupied by GlassFish-related booths. That area definitely felt like a "Sun" area, as I wandered through it. The GlassFish project home page today highlights several Sun white papers. Clearly, Sun's support of GlassFish is substantial.

Once the acquisition by Oracle is complete, a new set of bosses will be defining the priorities. And certainly there is overlap between GlassFish and Oracle's existing product line up. Oracle claims Sun is going to make a lot of money for Oracle shareholders. If they don't see a direct contribution to the Oracle bottom line from GlassFish, will they want to continue the current level of support?

New poll: is Oracle good for Java?

This week's new poll more specifically addresses changes that may occur as a result of Oracle's acquisition of Sun. A question posed at this week's Oracle Open World was "Is Oracle good for Java?" You can express your view by votingin the new poll. Feel free also to leave a comment, since this question is larger than what can be effectively put into response options consisting of a just a few words each.


In Java Today, JetBrains announced the open sourcing of IntelliJ IDEA. I received an email from Eugenia Dubova stating:

JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA goes open source today, with its newly introduced free Community Edition. Starting with the upcoming version 9.0, IntelliJ IDEA will be offered in two editions: Community Edition, free and open-source, and Ultimate Edition, the full-featured commercial IntelliJ IDEA with the complete set of web and enterprise development tools for extensive professional development. The price tag - the most important barrier to a wider adoption of IntelliJ IDEA in pure Java development - has been removed. The dream of many Java developers comes true...

peligri covered the OpenWorld 2009 Keynotes - Scott and Larry:

The first 4 recordings of the keynotes from Oracle OpenWorld are now available. The recordings are very well done: they are available for download in multiple formats (flash video/audio, mp4, mp3, ppt, txt) and the web viewer synchronizes video, audio, slides and transcript; nice! ...

Arun Gupta continued his conference coverage series with Oracle Open World 2009 - Day 3 Report:

Day 3 of Oracle Open World 2009 (Day 1, Day 2) started on an adventurous note for me. The San Francisco Bay Area got hit with the strongest October storm in 47 years and so the ride from home to Moscone Center took almost 30 extra minutes, because of flooded roads, strong winds, other accidents, and hydroplaning multiple times. Anyway only missed first few minutes of Thomas Kurian’s keynote. Kurian is no stranger to the Java crowd because he is a regular keynote speaker at JavaOne. However it was totally impressive to see customer endorsements (both quality and quantity) and how they are using Oracle to solve operational problems...

In today's Weblogs, Ed Burns talks about JSF2 Facelet Tag Handlers:

The following topics and more will be covered in detail in my upcoming book with Neil Griffin, JavaServer Faces 2.0: The Complete Reference. Please enjoy this early access content! One challenging aspect of designing JSF 2.0 was how to standardize Facelets. We wanted to standardize only the minimum amount that would still allow developers get the job done. Initially, we did not include binary custom tag handlers in the standard because most users of Facelets were simply using it to declare pages of existing UI components...

Jim Driscoll provides An (almost) comprehensive list of Web Components:

In talking with Andy Schwartz before our recent talk together at Oracle Open World, Andy mentioned that he'd like to see some new components make it in to JSF 2.1. I'd like to see that too - but what new components? To aid the discussion, I thought it might be handy to make up a list of components that I think would be handy for JSF - but please, don't take this as an endorsement of any particular component for inclusion into the spec...

Cay Horstmann goes over Recursive varargs methods in Scala:

And now for something entirely different...one of my students asked how to write a recursive function in Scala with varargs. Apparently, the internet has lots of articles complaining about the challenge of calling Java varargs methods from Scala, but this particular issue didnot google well. Here goes...

 

In Scala, you declare varargs like this ...


In the Forums,vinaykagarwal is working on a VFS update on Samsung P1600: "Hello, Has anyone tested Samsung P1600 (or others) for VFS update? I can't seem to make it work. Testing with the ProgressivePlaylist sample, it goes through all the VFS update steps but fails for invalid playlist error. Listing of..."

guruvulubojja has a JMS Q Listner (MDB) Problem: "hi gurus, i have a problem with MDB. my scenario is i need two JMS Queues and two listners for the queues. for that i have created two connection factories and two destination resources in glasshfish admin console. Connection..."

And rajasekhar1242 sees the message no resource bundle found for version, using default GlassFish version: "hi, I want to develop web service Using netbeans IDE. When i deploy my project have seen this meesage " no resource bundle found for version, using default GlassFish version" , also getting when i click on the test web service..."


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFXpert RIA Exemplar Challenge. The java.net JUGs Community reports: Java Champion Jim Weaver has a serious JavaFX contest going on. "Create an application in JavaFX that exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA (rich internet application)". Entries must be submitted in the form of a NetBeans project by 00:00 GMT on 10 January 2010.


The new java.net Poll asks Is Oracle good for Java? The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Manish K. Maheshwari's Sweeping the File System with NIO-2, which describes how JSR 203 (NIO-2), which is being implemented in the OpenJDK project, is shaping the future of I/O in the upcoming JDK 7. We're also featuring John Ferguson Smart's article Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1, which shows why, if you are a NetBeans user working with Maven, you're in luck with NetBeans 6.7.1.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 89: David "Left" Schlesinger on Open Source: David "Left" Schlesinger, Director of Open Source Technologies at Access, shares his views on open source with Terrence Barr.


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

Yesterday we published two new java.net articles: Sweeping the File System with NIO-2, by Manish K. Maheshwari (his first java.net article), and Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1, by John Ferguson Smart. We also published a new Java Mobile podcast, Java Mobile Podcast 89: David "Left" Schlesinger on Open Source.

Sweeping the File System with NIO-2

Manish's article provides a comprehensive introduction to JSR 203: More New I/O APIs for the Java Platform. Manish starts out by stating the problem:

A good number of Java applications work closely with the file system. The historic file system management capabilities in the JDK are limited, and therefore even commonly performed file interactions can require a lot of custom coding on top of the provided API. For example, let's say that you need to poll files for changes. You'd have to write that yourself. Even some of the provided features have deficiencies: the rename and move operations are not guaranteed to be atomic. In the event of failure, the original file and the target file may both exist or the target file may be incompletely written to the disk. The applications that want to handle these scenarios are forced to resort to native code and thus lose the platform-independence benefits of Java.

These are some pretty serious deficiencies, particularly as even desktop computing advances into the multithreaded realm due to the advent of multicore processors. To be sure, the integration of NIO-2 into JDK 7 is viewed by many developers as among the most critical of the JDK 7 enhancements.

Manish outlines the various facets of NIO-2, including discussion of the new, informative exceptions, class orchestration, the file notification and watch service API, the provider interface, interoperability, and tree walking.

Before Manish sent the article to me, it was reviewed by Alan Bateman, the specification lead for JSR-203, and the implementation lead for NIO-2 in the OpenJDK project. So, if you're looking for an authoritative overview of NIO-2, that you can consume in one sitting, do check out Manish's article, Sweeping the File System with NIO-2

Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1

John Ferguson Smart, who published his first java.net article in early 2006, is a freelance consultant who specializes in enterprise Java, web development, and open source technologies. If you're a regular visitor to the java.net home page, you'll have seen his blog posts regularly highlighted there.

Among John's current interests are open source tools that contribute increased efficiency to the software development process. His new article Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1 goes over the considerable enhancements that are built into NetBeans 6.7.1 for integration with Apache Mavenprojects.

While John notes that the integration of Maven in m2eclipse remains more mature than what's available in NetBeans, he sees the enhancements in NetBeans 6.7.1 as being a major leap in capability for Maven users. Indeed, the NetBeans approach to Maven seems to offer some advantages with respect to design and seamless integration:

Eclipse has traditionally had rich, though sometimes brittle, Maven support in the form of the m2eclipse plugin. NetBeans Maven support, on the other hand, is a more recent innovation, but that has been getting better and better with each release.

Working with Maven in NetBeans 6.7.1 covers:

  • Creating a Maven project in NetBeans
  • Working with your Maven project
  • Managing the Pom file
  • Managing Dependencies

John's conclusion begins:

The bottom line is, if you are a NetBeans fan, the latest NetBeans release comes packed with features that can make it easier to work with Maven projects. The integration is seamless, and the interface well designed and ergonomic.

And he ends his article with "it's great to see the quality of Maven IDE support growing strongly in at least two of the three major Java IDEs."


In Java Today, Cay Horstmann posted his report on Oracle OpenWorld Day 1:

I got a blogger pass for Oracle OpenWorld. Here is my report from the show floor. Yesterday, I wrote that Oracle OpenWorld seemed a bit bigger than Java One. Today when I saw the crowds during daytime I realized how naive I was. This is aHUGE conference, filling the main Moscone building, Moscone West, and two hotels. Talks range from "Virtualize your enterprise and cut costs with Oracle VM" to "Win Big with Government Contracts and PeopleSoft ESA". The bookstore didn't carry Core Java but instead featured books on Sarbanes-Oxley and self-motivation, in addition to the usual Oracle DBA fare. There were a few talks on Java, JDBC programming, JSF, ADF Faces, and the BEA app server...

Also reporting from OOW, Arun Gupta posted Oracle Open World 2009 - Day 2 Report:

Following from Day 1, the Day 2 started with Charles Phillips and Safra Catz keynote. The keynotes at Open World are significantly different from JavaOne or any other developer conference I've attended so far. Of course they are expected to be because Open World is not primarily a developer's conference. Oracle Develop (OD) certainly closely mimic any of the conferences I've typically attended. My "exhibitor" badge restricted me from attending any of the sessions at OD though. Here are some interesting statistics about the conference ...

Java Champion Bert Ertman is also at the conference, and posted his Impressions from Oracle OpenWorld: "Is Oracle good for Java?":

Here's a little write-up of my Oracle OpenWorld impressions so far. I'll try to make it a complete, logical story, but first I would like to second some excellent observations made by fellow Java Champion Cay Horstmann (yeah, the hero that wrote 'Core Java'), who blogs about his first day of OpenWorld at java.net.

The big question for me is: "Is Java safe in the hands of Oracle"? Unfortunately, I cannot answer that question based upon my impressions so far, but I can say that the message (or lack of) that Oracle is sending out so far is giving me some shivers down the spine. Here

Masoud Kalili has been thinking recently about competition as it applies within the open source realm, versus how it applies within the corporate business realm. In his recent blog post Competition is good but to what extent and at what expense...Masoud begins by saying:

It is always said that competition between different producer and companies producing similar products is good for the end users and consumer of those products because the each company tried to provide better products to satisfy the consumer and finally receive more income.

All of the above are true when we are discussing commercial entities which produce the products, for example ORACLE and IBM competition lead to better database and set of middle-ware. But I believe it is not the case for open source projects and specially for smaller open source projects.

He goes on to note that comhttp://java.net/homepage/managepetition between similar, small open source projects can be wasteful:

Looking around we can find at least 10 different open source blogging clients, MP3 meta data editing tools, media players, instant messaging clients and so on. Except for the first project, other similar projects started after there was something usable around. Developers working on each of these projects work to implement same set of features...

I agree with Masoud that in the open source world there is an incredible amount of, in essence, duplicated effort. And much of this duplication of effort is of a type that would never occur in the corporate business world. In the open source realm, you can indeed have a plethora of small projects that have approximately the same objective, but with various tweaks in the feature set. This happens to a much lesser extent in the business world.

So, what difference between open source and corporate business drives this? Well, it's money. In the corporate business world, all effort is funded by someone. If an idea doesn't convince someone that a profit can be generated somewhere down the line, that idea does not receive funding; and no development effort (beyond, perhaps, a very basic prototype) is expended.

Meanwhile, with open source, the driver behind the effort is usually some combination of love of the activity of software engineering, practicality ("I need this, and it doesn't exist, so I'll invent it"), charity ("the world needs this, so I'll provide it"), socialization (each open source project is its own little community), ego ("I like seeing my name up there as owner of a project") -- and, there can also be a desire and/or hope for eventual profit. Even without profit, you could say that open source projects are kind of like little businesses that operate within a different realm, where the currency through which effort is rewarded is self-satisfaction, influence, or fame, rather than hard, cold cash. Though, sometimes, involvement in a major open source project can indirectly turn into cash by spiffing up your resume, leading to new professional consulting opportunities or a better chance to land your next job.

The profit motive for a software engineering project within a corporation is number one, while in a smaller open source project financial profit is typically far down on the list of objectives, if it's there at all.

Due to the tether of needing to make immediately visible to the marketing team the probability of making a profit (and soon!), many good ideas go nowhere in the corporate world. I think this is a major reason why open source came to be such a powerful force in software engineering. Surely, everyone would be pleased if their ideas and their work ultimately produced a financial reward. But, sometimes the desire to make the idea reality is sufficiently pervasive that developers, seeing no route within their day jobs, decide to work on the project on their own. Especially when open source was first coming into being, I think this was the case.

Masoud, who has worked on many open source projects, looks at the wasted effort expended by 90% of small projects that seek to create their own version of a product that already exists in a bigger, more established open source project:

I know that there are architectural differences between projects and developers think that they will do the job better than the previous one, I was there once and I know how does it feel, but believe me, working together on a single project makes much more sense than working on 10 separate projects with similar goals and later on seeing 7 of them abandoned.

A better solution:

Imagine that all developers working on different instant messaging project combine the effort and work on one of available IM projects, wouldn't that please everyone in the community?

Masoud's view on open source projects and developer effort is practical. Pooling efforts indeed produces more functional and fully featured products. You see this in the big open source projects.

But, some people are by nature inventors, and need constantly to strike out on their own. They don't like to be limited by other people's opinions, constrained by things like a "community process." Such constraints immediately begin to feel like an overarching bureaucracy to these people, somewhat like what exists in the corporate world. They don't like limiting structures, so they leave and start new projects.

Others, of course, simply have big egos, or can't get along with anyone else, so they prefer to create and work on their own one-person projects.

Between these two groups, the natural inventors and the big egos, I think we'll always have lots of small open source projects, and lots of basically duplicated developer effort. But it's also true that among that small, devoted inventor group, some people are today working on ideas no one else is thinking about, that will become major products everyone knows about 10 years from now.


In Java Today,Janice J. Heisshas a new article, Oracle Develop Offers Updates on Java Technology:

Oracle OpenWorld 2009 begins on Sunday, October 11, and continues until October 15 at Moscone Center in San Francisco, California. Oracle Develop, a premier developer conference for Oracle technologists sponsored by Sun Microsystems, takes place from October 11 to 13 at the nearby San Francisco Hilton. Oracle OpenWorld offers more than 1800 sessions, 400 partner exhibits, keynotes from the world's technology leaders, hands-on labs, several special networking events, and more...

The Java ME SDK Team is running a Device Selector Poll:

Java ME SDK 3.0 was released half a year ago. During this time you have got a lot of experience with this product and we would be happy if you could share it with us. It helps us to improve the product to satisfy your needs. Today we would like to know your opinion about Device Selector...

Terrence Barr invites developers to Join me at the Mobile 2.0 Conference this week:

I'm in the San Francisco Bay Area this week for the Mobile 2.0 Conference (Thu, 10/15 and Fri, 10/16). Mobile 2.0 is a grass-roots conference that brings together experts and thought leaders from around the mobile ecosystem. It focuses on new mobile applications and services, mobile ecosystem issues, and disruptive mobile innovation...

In today's Weblogs, Masoud Kalili says Competition is good but to what extend and at what expense...:

It is always said that competition between different producer and companies producing similar products is good for the end users and consumer of those products because the each company tried to provide better products to satisfy the consumer and finally receive more income. All of the above are true when we are discussing commercial entities which produce the products, for example ORACLE and IBM competition lead to better database and set of middle-ware. But I believe it is not the case for open source projects and specially for smaller open source projects...

Rex Young continues his series with Thread-Safe Swing Application (Part 2):

Design thread model along with OO model for your Swing application. A thread model defines a scope e.g. a set of classes a thread (or a pool of threads) will stay in. As threads would step out the scope, scopes employ message passing for event notification...

Jim Driscoll talks about JSF 2, Custom Java Components, and Ajax Behaviors:

Unlike most of my blog posts, where I try to describe the easiest possible way to do things, in this posting, I'll instead go over a Java-based custom JSF component that responds to the Ajax tag. The reason being that there simply aren't any examples out there of how to do this, and at least two people have expressed interest in finding exactly out how this is done. I'd advise anyone considering doing this to make really sure that you can't do the same thing in a Composite Component (you usually can), but sometimes, a Java-based custom JSF component is going to be required. We're going to cover the following topics here, and it's going to be a little more code than usual, but I suspect that this will end up saving some folks a bunch of time, so lets plow forward. I'll cover ...

In the Forums,bconnors has JXMapKit questions: "I just started playing with JXMapKit and the JXMapViewer. Maybe I'm doing something wrong but it would appear that there are some issues lurking out there. The first is when creating a TileFactoryInfo object and try to constrain the zoom to 5 levels, I..."

gkari is working on JPA - One to Many persistence issue: "Hi All, We are facing an issue with one to many relationship persistence using JPA. We have a one to many relationship between Company and Personnel. When A personnel is created, the company(the parent in the relationship) is..."

And thisisnotme has A couple of questions about the virtual keyboard: "The keyboard works really well on my Nokia 5800, running their Beta Java VM. I have a couple of questions: 1. We're meant to initialise the keyboard before calling Display.init(): VKBImplementationFactory.init(); ..."


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFXpert RIA Exemplar Challenge. The java.net JUGs Community reports: Java Champion Jim Weaver has a serious JavaFX contest going on. "Create an application in JavaFX that exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA (rich internet application)". Entries must be submitted in the form of a NetBeans project by 00:00 GMT on 10 January 2010.


The current java.net Poll asks What future do you foresee for GlassFish? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Lowery's A Finite State Machine Supporting Concurrent States, which demonstrates how Java enums and EnumSets can be used as a basis to define and validate application states and state transitions. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 88: Robert Virkus of Enough Software: 'A conversation with Robert Virkus of Enough Software about J2MEPolish and the "Mobile Deverloper's Guide to the Galaxy."'


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

I had planned to attend Oracle Open World 2009. Not that anyone had suggested that my duties as java.net editor might require that. I was just thinking, over the summer, that a confluence of many different strands of my past and present career seemed to point to me attending Oracle Open World this year.

For example, I've worked with fairly high-end Sun servers in a data center environment almost constantly since 1993. There have actually been two different data centers (though they were constructed for the same organization). The first one didn't involve enormous database activity, so we used PostgreSQL. The second data center was designed from the start to utilize a database as the centerpoint of the structural organization for the data processing. For that data center (which has been fully operational for some time now), an Oracle database was selected. Hmm.. Sun meets Oracle...

Meanwhile, more than a year ago, I was managing editor for BEA's developer sites, when Oracle acquired BEA. That transition introduced me to Oracle from a new point of view -- it was a partner role, as I assisted in the transition, working directly with people from Oracle as well as from BEA. In the data center, I'm an Oracle user and customer. With the BEA transition, I was (briefly) a member of the Oracle team.

But, then I moved on...

This must have been a trying period for Oracle. Because it soon became obvious that they really missed working with me! After less than a year of not hearing my voice in meetings, they apparently searched the net, and found out that I was now working as java.net editor. And so (I hope I don't get in trouble for saying this), the truth is: it was actually as a means of bringing me back into their status meetings that Oracle decided to acquire Sun. How strange life is, no? [Editor's Note: of course, no such meetings have taken place to this point; nor does the writer have any specific knowledge that what is stated here is true, nor can it be independently verified, etc., etc.]

Considering all of these things, I really thought attending Oracle Open World 2009 was going to happen for me. It really would have fit in perfectly, don't you think? I even registered early on for a pass that would let me visit the exhibition hall... As things turned out, it was not to be.

Fortunately, though, many members of the java.net community are either presenting at Oracle Open World 2009 or reporting on it. All three Java Today entries and one of today's highlighted blogs have as their topic this year's conference. In addition, Sun's communications group sent me an email invitation to join them at Oracle Open World. The message includes a link to Sun sessions at the conference.

So, I'm watching Oracle Open World 2009 with great interest this week -- but (alas!) from afar.


In Java Today, the java.net Java User Groups Community is highlighting Java Champions & JUG Leaders Meet Oracle User Group leaders at Oracle Open World 2009 -- Sun Oct 11th:

Several JUG Leaders and Java Champions checked out Oracle Open World. Sunday activities were centered around events and presentations run by the various Oracle User Groups. JUG Leaders and Champions: met up with the Sun Community Program Mgr and Coordinator at check-in; attended an oracle user group session; checked-out the Hands-On Labs at Oracle Develop (Hilton); attended the Sunday Kick-Off Keynote; and, met up with the Oracle User Group Leaders (i.e. www.odtug.com) in the evening for an impromptu social mixer at the Marriott. JUG and OUG leaders had lots to talk about. Discussions centered around Java Technology, Java EE, JDeveloper, NetBeans, Eclipse, Garbage Collection, and Community building tools/websites...

peligri posted One More Update on OpenWorld and GlassFish:

Oracle OpenWorld started today. Family commitments didn't let me go there today (do check OpenWorld Live) but I'm planning to be there Mon-Wed. I just tried to capture a few of the events I want to attend and it is as bad as JavaOne - actually, OOW seems worse, but I'm just sampling it, while I try to be exhaustive with J1. I created a Mini-Calendar to help me track what I want to attend (ha!); you are welcome to check it but beware I've not had time to double check it yet and I need to add events also...

Arun Gupta provides Oracle Open World 2009 - Day 1 Report:

Sun Microsystems is the innovation sponsor of Oracle Open World 2009. And that's what was the theme of Scott McNealy's keynote on a "Sun"day. It's been a while that I've seen Scott on the keynote stage and it truly was an enjoyable experience. In his characteristic way, he gave top 10 reasons that "Engineers have gone wild" as...

In today's Weblogs, Cay Horstmann reports on Oracle OpenWorld Day Zero:

Aaron Houston, the fearless leader of the Java Champions, got me a blogger pass to Oracle OpenWorld. Here is what I learned on the opening night. If you thought Java One is big, Oracle OpenWorld seems bigger. The keynote was packed - and that on a Sunday night! The party afterwards was not in the cavernous Moscone center, but in tents on Howard Street and around Yerba Buena Gardens. The food was better than at Java One, and drinks were free, just like in the good old days of Java One. But, and that's a big but, you've got to love red. Red was everywhere. Scott McNealy presided over the evening keynote, and even he wore a maroon sweater, the closest he could come to red, he said...

Felipe Gaucho describes Java EE Continuous Integration powered by Maven & Glassfish:

Can you compile, deploy and test your Java EE projects with just 1 line of command? Check it out. I have no time for documentations lately, but I prefer to give you a chance to early adopt my build script and take your own conclusions. Following the steps below, you will have my Java EE 5 application running in your Glassfish v2.1 server - including test data populated in the MySql database....

And Sahoo asks Should Class.getAnnotations fail if an annotation type is not available?:

While evaluating a GlassFish bug, I discovered a discrepancy in behavior of Class.getAnnotations() between IBM JRE and Sun JRE. the complex GlassFish issue boiled down to a simple test case as discussed below. The question is what should be the behavior of Class.getAnnotations() if one or more annotation class is not available at runtime. Consider the following test case...

In the Forums,digitalsol needs a J2ME library with font size change possibility: "Hello all, I need a J2ME solution which possesses font size change option (including the text on the commands). So far I know that the J2ME Polish library have this possibility. Only few standard J2ME lcdui components can change their text..."

aliatis finds that Object collision not works: "Hi, guys. The object collision don't work properly. I load a model of Sketchup and the avatar can pass trough it. The collision checkbox is enabled. What's wrong? ..."

And cpsudhar is seeing a Sony Ericsson compatibility issue!!!: "I created a simple app using netbeans... the app works fine with my friends Nokia mobile but when i try to send the jar to my Sony Ericsson W580i... after the file transfer completes my phone says "Operation Failed"... Can someone please tell..."


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFXpert RIA Exemplar Challenge. The java.net JUGs Community reports: Java Champion Jim Weaver has a serious JavaFX contest going on. "Create an application in JavaFX that exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA (rich internet application)". Entries must be submitted in the form of a NetBeans project by 00:00 GMT on 10 January 2010.


The current java.net Poll asks What future do you foresee for GlassFish? The poll will run through Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Lowery's A Finite State Machine Supporting Concurrent States, which demonstrates how Java enums and EnumSets can be used as a basis to define and validate application states and state transitions. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 88: Robert Virkus of Enough Software: 'A conversation with Robert Virkus of Enough Software about J2MEPolish and the "Mobile Deverloper's Guide to the Galaxy."'


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

In this week's java.net Spotlight, we're featuring Java Champion James Weaver's new contest, the JavaFXpert RIA Exemplar Challenge. The contest challenges teams consisting of a developer and a graphic designer to:

Create an application in JavaFX that exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA (rich internet application).

The contest is a follow-on to a question James asked late last year, "Should There be Enterprise RIA Style Guidelines?", and the responses that question elicited.

The rules regarding the team requirement are specific: there must be two people, a graphic designer and a developer. The rules do not state that specific credentials are required to "prove" one's qualification as being a "graphic designer" (or a "programmer" for that matter). But a team of two is definitely required (i.e., a graphic designer who also has development skills does not meet the "team" requirement).

In a response to a query about this, Jim said:

My main objective is to challenge the best developers and graphic designers to re-imagine the appearance and behavior of enterprise RIAs. By doing this as a team, I hope to draw from the strengths of each, as well as to gain the benefits of collaboration. I do realize that this may cause less people to enter the challenge.

There is a substantial prize for the winning team: $1000 (US) for each team member.

Entries must be delivered (to a soon-to-be-identified email address) in the form of a NetBeans project by Midnight GMT on January 10, 2010. Judging will be performed by Jim and a graphics designer, with the judging criteria being how well the entry "exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA."

Also, the code must be open source, and licensed using the updated Berkeley Software Distribution License. The winning entry will be added to the JFXtras projectsamples library.


In Java Today, Robert Chinnici reports that Java EE 6 platform specification reaches Proposed Final Draft stage:

The Proposed Final Draft (PFD) of the Java EE 6 Platform specification and of the two other specs being defined by the JSR-316 expert group, the Java EE 6 Web Profile specification and the Managed Beans specification, is now available from the JCP web site.

Arun Gupta provides TOTD #112: Exposing Oracle database tables as RESTful entities using JAX-RS, GlassFish, and NetBeans:

This Tip OfThe Day explains how to expose an existing Oracle database table as a RESTful Web service endpoint using NetBeans tooling and deployed on GlassFish. Lets get started!

Jean-Francois Arcand announces Atmosphere at Oracle OpenWorld Unconference:

@jfarcandwill talk about the Atmosphere Framework at the upcoming Oracle OpenWorld (October 13th Tuesday, 1-2pm). If you are around, come to learn what is Atmosphere and how you can write RESTful and Asynchronous Web (Comet/Ajax Push) application using Scala, JRuby, Java or Groovy!

In today's Weblogs, John Ferguson Smark presents 10 Hudson Plugins you can't live without!:

One of the great things about Hudson is not in Hudson itself, but in its rich library of plugins, covering everything from code quality metrics to VMWare and Amazon EC2 integration! But there are so many, it's sometimes hard to choose, and new ones are coming out all the time. So in the latest issue of the Java Power Tools Newsletter, we will take a look at a top-ten of Hudson plugins - 10...

Carol McDonald continues her series with OWASP Top 10 number 3: Malicious File Execution:

Number 3 in the Top 10 most critical web application security vulnerabilities identified by the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) is Malicious File Execution, which occurs when attacker's files are executed or processed by the web server. This can happen when an input filename is compromised or an uploaded file is...

Bhavani Shankar announces Rolling upgrade of SailFin demonstrated:

What is rolling upgrade? Rolling upgrade is a zero downtime upgrade of the SailFin cluster. It can broadly be classfied into the following types : Upgrade of your running application. Upgrade of your hardware hosting the SailFin cluster. Upgrade of your running SailFin cluster from version 'x' to version 'y' ('y' should be backward compatible with 'x') As simple as applying a...

In the Forums,nnjones wonders Can I Webstart 0.4 using only an ethernet switch (not a router): "Is it possible to use the Java Webstart version (jnlp) of WL 0.4 in an isolated LAN that is only hooked up to a switch? I keep getting malformed URL exceptions on the webstart piece when I launch from the browser. (e.g., dev.java.net) And they are in..."

ezez85 is working on an Application to connect to Wireless LAN: "Hi all, I have a questions regarding one of the project i am working on. My project require to use a java application to search for the wireless network and if it is not there, it can join the next prefer network. I am able to work using microsoft Vista..."

And Felipe Gaucho has a GlassFish question, what is the default V3 password ?: "in v2.1 it is adminadmin, in v3 it is ??"


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFXpert RIA Exemplar Challenge. The java.net JUGs Community reports: Java Champion Jim Weaver has a serious JavaFX contest going on. "Create an application in JavaFX that exemplifies the appearance and behavior of a next-generation enterprise RIA (rich internet application)". Entries must be submitted in the form of a NetBeans project by 00:00 GMT on 10 January 2010.


The current java.net Poll asks Which IDE do you use? The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Lowery's A Finite State Machine Supporting Concurrent States, which demonstrates how Java enums and EnumSets can be used as a basis to define and validate application states and state transitions. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 88: Robert Virkus of Enough Software: 'A conversation with Robert Virkus of Enough Software about J2MEPolish and the "Mobile Deverloper's Guide to the Galaxy."'


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

This past week's java.net pollsuggests that Eclipse and NetBeans lead the way among IDEs, and are about equally popular. A total of 528 votes were cast. The exact question and results were:

Which IDE do you use?

  • 39% (207 votes) - NetBeans
  • 41% (216 votes) - Eclipse
  • 8% (42 votes) - Another IDE
  • 7% (38 votes) - Multiple of the above
  • 4% (21 votes) - I use a text editor
  • 1% (4 votes) - Other

The results suggest that NetBeans and Eclipse share a predominate position among IDEs, and are used by at least 80% of Java developers.

Three comments were posted. rdelaplante objected to IntelliJ IDEA not being specified among the options:

Leaving out IntelliJ IDEA is like leaving out Eclipse

denka gave that comment a "ditto," adding:

Sun bought the wrong company (hope this did not affect the poll selection)... But then so did Borland :)

I actually did think about making IntelliJ IDEA one of the options. But, then, I also considered the fact that there are other IDEs that have their own core group of advocates, and the options list had to be truncated somewhere. So, I explicitly named the IDEs that, based on what I've observed, probably have the biggest user communities -- namely, Eclipse and NetBeans. I'll assuredenka that the fact that Sun supports java.net had nothing to do with the decision to not give IntelliJ IDEA it's own slot.

If the actual poll results have any accuracy (the poll, of course, is not scientific), then my decision was the right one. If IntelliJ IDEA really is as important and as widely used as Eclipse, then the "Another IDE" option should have garnered the largest share of votes. But the actual votes cast for "Another IDE" was only about 20% of the votes cast for either Eclipse or NetBeans. Possibly IntelliJ IDEA is much more widely used than the poll suggests, but its users don't visit java.net all that much?

New poll: GlassFish's future?

Yesterday, I studied the history of GlassFish downloads over the past four years, and noted that GlassFish appears to be on the cusp of a major leap in adoption. Staying on that subject, the new poll asks "What future do you foresee for GlassFish?" Voting will be open through next Thursday.


In Java Today, James Gosling is Heading to Oracle OpenWorld:

Next week should be real interesting: I'm spending a big chunk of it at Oracle's OpenWorld conference. I'll be helping out Scott at his keynote. As usual, I expect Scott to be fun :-). I'm doing a talk the next day down the road at the Hilton where Oracle is holding their Developconference. Sun is leading a number of sessions on enterprise topics. I'm going to try to stretch people's minds about what "enterprise" means.

Janice J. Heiss has a new article up on the Sun Developer Network, Oracle Develop Offers Updates on Java Technology:

Oracle OpenWorld 2009 begins on Sunday, October 11, and continues until October 15 at Moscone Center in San Francisco, California. Oracle Develop, a premier developer conference for Oracle technologists sponsored by Sun Microsystems, takes place from October 11 to 13 at the nearby San Francisco Hilton. Oracle OpenWorld offers more than 1800 sessions, 400 partner exhibits, keynotes from the world's technology leaders, hands-on labs, several special networking events, and more...

Josh Marinacci has created SideHatch: a JavaFX debugging tool:

I

These days, we're accustomed to hearing bad news on the economic front. However, GlassFish has just recorded a record-setting September in terms of downloads, registrations, and admin pings. The GlassFish downloads graph is indicative of a "breakout" for GlassFish within the application server market sphere.

In ancient (i.e., when I used to trade) stock chart watcher's parlance, a "breakout" was when a relatively stable level is suddenly interrupted by a lurch in a particular direction. Such sudden lurches were considered harbingers of major readjustments in the stock's pricing. Maybe stock charts are still interpreted that way by some technical analysts. Anyway, the interpretation of the lastest GlassFish graph would be that developers who need an application server are suddenly moving toward GlassFish. Perhaps the Version 3.0 enhancements, stability, and the more complete, integrated platform are attracting attention?

In his brief Aquarium post, peligri notes that the Google Trends graph for four leading app servers (GlassFish, JBoss, WebLogic, WebSphere) shows GlassFish holding steady in September, while the others decline. One thing I've noticed about Google Trends is that if a line is flat, it actually means that overall interest in that "topic" is increasing. Because the Google Trends search volume index for a topic is (I'm pretty sure) a measure of the proportion of all searches for that topic with respect to total Google searches. Since the number of topics and total search volume are ever expanding, if an individual topic or keyword has a flat Google Trends graph, that would mean that interest in that topic is changing at the same percentage rate as the total number of Google searches. Since total searches are increasing, a flat Google Trends line means the actual number of searches for that topic is increasing. Hence, I'd suggest that there is no inconsistency between the flat Google Trends line for GlassFish and the recent upward trend in the graphs for actual downloads.

peligri also wrote a longer post on his blogs.sun.com blog. There, he cites the following reasons for the upturn:

The good numbers are partly due to the end of the summer, partly to people getting over the Sun+Oracle noise, partly to GFv3/JavaEE 6 getting closer, and partly to improved visibility of our downloads links in different Java.Sun.Com sites.

I'll grant that -- but to me, that cannot fully explain the almost doubling of GlassFish SDK downloads (to 389,603) from a baseline extending all the way back to July 2005 where the monthly SDK downloads were typically in the 150,000 to 200,000 range. If I'm reading the chart correctly, September's GlassFish SDK downloads were about 50% higher than August's.

Furthermore, the chart shows a previous peak for SDK downloads in March of this year. And prior to that, there was a significant peak last September. Each successive SDK download peak is significantly higher than the last one. To me, that suggests that GlassFish is taking off.

At JavaOne, I spent a lot of the little free time that was available to me wandering around the GlassFish-centric booths. It was impressive to see all the component projects in action, demonstrated and explained by the developers. The software is impressive, the community is vibrant, the sub-projects are well organized and are producing a very well-rounded suite of extensions/add-ons to an increasingly rock-solid, stable, GlassFish base platform.

The world, I think, is taking notice.


In Java Today,peligri notes that The Summer is Over - September is a Record Month for GlassFish:

I've pushed out the Sept 2009 Adoption Stats for GlassFish and it shows a record month ondownloads, registrations and admin pings. Of all the numbers, I like best the number of unique registered users: 387,384! ...

The java.net JUGs Community has posted A Report from 4th Annual Silicon Valley Code Camp (Oct 3-4) -- Java Evangelist Doris Chen:

Sun Microsystems Java Evangelist Doris Chen reports: '...The 4th Silicon Valley Code Camp took place at Foothill College (Los Altos, CA) on (Oct. 3-4). Over a thousand developers attended this event and 140+ sessions were presented. I presented "Developing Revolutionary Web Applications using Comet and Ajax Push [on Slide Share]". The session was extremely well attended (full house with around 80 people). The session was very demo intensive. I did 4 demos and showed a lot of code throughout the presentation...'

Java Champion Jim Weaver talks about a new JavaFX app he's using in You had me at Least Common Multiple :-):

One of the student winners of the the JavaFX Coding Challenge is Kazuki Hamasaki, who created the CalcFXprogram. CalcFX is a deceptively functional (and incredibly useful) calculator, and is now one of the Java Web Start shortcuts on my desktop...

In today's Weblogs, John Ferguson Smart begins a series with Kickass Hudson Plugins - part 1 - Setenv and the Description Setter:

One of the awesome things about Hudson is the sheer number of plugins available. In fact, if you use Hudson, make a habit of checking out the list of available plugins every month or so - there's bound to be something new that you could use! In this article, I explore two relatively new ones: theSetenv plugin and the Description Setter plugin...

Cay Horstmann provides a new Java/CS1 Cheat Sheet:

The next edition of my CS1/Java book is going to print soon. At the last minute, we decided to put the real estate of the inside covers to good use and include a "cheat sheet" with the most important Java control structures and libraries. Since it would be particularly embarrassing to have a typo here, I am hoping to enlist the aid of the community...

And Remi Forax posted JDK7 do escape analysis by default:

During the JVM Summit, I was doing some tests for my presentation with the latest jdk7 binaries when I've seen some *BIG* performance improvement between jdk7 b71 and jdk7 b72. A quick look to the summary of changes, hum, Escape Analysis is now enabled by default. On my tests, I got a 3x improvement, Wow ! ...

In the Forums,tdanecito has a Web Start preformance question...: "Hi All, I noticed that for every jax-ws (metro) call to connect back to my server where Web Start app was downloaded from it does a checkConnect from the web start security package. Why would it do that and is there a way to turn it off after..."

leswestberg has a Problem Setting GlassFish Enterprise 2.1 to run in FIPS mode: "The issue we are seeing is that if you install GlassFish Enterprise 2.1 with HADB on Windows XP professional with Service Pack 3 or Windows Vista, it is installed using the NSS libraries. GlassFish starts up fine. However the problem arises with the..."http://blogs.sun.com/theaquarium/entry/the_summer_is_over_record

And dabd gets an error WebappClassLoader not yet started or already stopped: "Hello, I get the following error: "java.lang.Error: WebappClassLoader WebappClassLoader delegate: true repositories: not yet started or already stopped" when invoking a JAX-RS Web Service on my deployment glassfish..."


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFX Survey. Danny Coward, reporting on the survey, said: "Don't bottle up any unexpressedopinionsabout JavaFX, take the survey. Mixed in with the usual snoozeville multichoice questions about the kind of project you work on, you get to rate the current feature set and rank the importance of new features the team's working on: tooling, more controls, performance...."


The current java.net Poll asks Which IDE do you use? The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Lowery's A Finite State Machine Supporting Concurrent States, which demonstrates how Java enums and EnumSets can be used as a basis to define and validate application states and state transitions. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 88: Robert Virkus of Enough Software: 'A conversation with Robert Virkus of Enough Software about J2MEPolish and the "Mobile Deverloper's Guide to the Galaxy."'


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

Some years ago, on a technology publishers mailing list, I questioned whether Google's "Don't be evil" slogan had any real meaning. I was immediately rebuked once it was discovered that I hadn't even tried out some of the Google services that were under discussion. But, among the reasons I hadn't tried all the services was that I was wary of the massive agglomeration of information of all types that was accruing within Google's databases and servers. This V'GER-like gathering of all the information in the world that can possibly be gathered into one place, to me, seemed to at minimum lay the groundwork for the possibility of misuse in the future. Not that that's happened (to my knowledge). But still, to me, there's always seemed to be a bit of the "bully" in Google's swagger and its approach to extending its tentacles into new markets. And why do you have to explicitly say "Don't be evil?" Isn't that a given?

In more recent years, quite a few other people have come to find some of the behemoth's actions disconcerting. For example, there was the lawsuit over Google's decision to just start scanning in books and presenting their content online. Some thought that was a bit of overreach, possibly a violation of copyright laws.

More recently, people are wondering about Google with regard to the network neutrality debate. Network neutrality as Google would like it to be enforced turns out to be quite beneficial for the Google business model -- while that same "neutrality" ensures that the transport extremely heavy (in byte size) internet content will be paid for in part by people whose use of the web is quite lightweight.

Next, there's Google Android. Is it Java? What about the Java Community Process? As Simon Morris noted, Android "caused a minor stir" when it was initially launched. It seems to me that the stir has only increased over time.

Terrence Barr points out that "Google's Android philosophy may not be exactly what the developer community and open source advocates was hoping it to be" in his recent post Google Andriod: "Cease and Desist". Terrence points to some news that is apparently surprising many people, namely the cease-and-desist order Google has aimed at Cyanogen. "This is a weird one," says Dan Nosowitz in the Gizmodo post he wrote upon seeing the news. The comments people are leaving are quite interesting too.

Maybe the Cyanogen issue is a bit more serious than Microsoft's attack and subsequent gifting of Mike Rowe over his incredibly threatening MikeRoweSoft.com web site, or the McDonald's fury over one little Malaysian restaurant named "McCurry" (even if the owners were a bit disingenuous in saying the name really stands for "Malaysian Chicken Curry" -- shouldn't it be "MCCurry" in that case?).

Still, for a company that seems to like to barge right into territories that already have established players and rules, and do things the new way, the Google way, making up its own rules as it goes along -- one wonders why they would take such offense when someone wants to use their stuff as a basis for creating something new and unique that Google didn't think of?

Finally, Malcolm Davis just posted a Response to Bruce Eckel's Google Chrome Changes the Game, in which he points out that the road ahead for Chrome is "fraught with perils."

Seems like a lot of people are wondering about Google these days...


In Java Today, Java Champion Manfred Riem has created a minicast on Generating a getter and setter using NetBeans:

If you have ever wondered how to generate a getter and setter automatically using the NetBeans IDE, well view this minicast.

Malcolm Davis has posted a Response to Bruce Eckel

The winner of last month's JFXStudio Challenge, on the theme oftime, was recently announced by Josh Marinacci. Contestants submitted a JavaFX application that consisted of 30 or fewer lines, or 3000 or fewer characters. The application had to be somehow related to time.

There were eight entries. The winning entry was Mark Nankman's Pacman Clock (pictured below). All eight entries are posted in Josh's blog, and the images are live (i.e., they launch the actual submitted JavaFX applications).

The Pacman Clock features a pacman who represents the seconds of time. He travels around a circle, eating dots, which are evenly spaced at one second intervals. When he meets up with a ghost, he eats it and the ghost explodes, rapidly expanding to fill most of the clock window, before falling back to the circle of dots.

Other entries included:

  • Reaction Time, by Matthew Hegarty - a game that tests how quickly you can respond to prompts to type a specific key
  • Purple Spinner, by Muhammad Hakim - a somewhat mesmerizing spinning flower
  • Crystal Gears, by Philippe Lhost - turning gears the moving clock hands
  • Timer, by Vaibhav - a timer that counts down to zero based on an amount of time you set
  • 3D Cube, by Carl Dea - a cube that rotates as time ticks away (you can also rotate it with your mouse)
  • Word Clock, by Jasper Potts - concentric circles of words that rotate to give you the current time
  • Spin Clock, by Stephen Chin - numeric dials that spin to provide the current time

You can see pictures of all the entries, and also try them out, in Josh's post, Challenge:Time Winner announced.

Josh also announced that October's JFXStudio Challenge is underway. The rules are the same. The theme for the October contest is:Five.


In Java Today, Chris Wong's Multithreading and the Java Memory Model is available at JavaLobby:

At the New England Software Symposium, I attended Brian Goetz's session called "The Java Memory Model". When I saw the phrase "memory model" in the title I thought it would be about garbage collection, memory allocation and memory types. Instead, it is really about multithreading. The difference is that this presentation focuses on visibility, not locking or atomicity. This is my attempt to summarize his talk...

Josh Marinacci has announced the winner of the September JFXStudio Challenge:

The challenge this month, Time, was competitive. We received some really great entries. I

Our spotlight this week is the Second JavaFX Survey. Danny Coward notes that the survey provides an opportunity for you "to rate the current feature set and rank the importance of new features the team's working on: tooling, more controls, performance."

Terrence Barr also wrote about the survey:

Today, I am asking you to participate in our2nd JavaFX developer survey: This one is aboutyour experience developing with JavaFX. We want to hear the good. The bad. The pitfalls. And the stuff that's great and which enables you to create more immersive cross-platform content quicker.

Note that italicized phrase. If you haven't actually done any development using JavaFX, then there won't be many questions you can answer in on the survey.

Terrence says "the data will be reviewed directly by Sun's product development teams." I'm hoping the results will also be made public, since it would be interesting to see what the overall current view of JavaFX is, among developers who have at minimum done some work using JavaFX thus far.

Back in early May, we ran a poll where the question was "How quickly will JavaFX be adopted as a rich client technology? At that time, a majority of votes (53%) was cast for the response "It will never be widely used." But almost 40% thought the technology probably had a future, at some level of significance.

A survey like the new JavaFX Survey has as its goal bringing about that future, by enabling the JavaFX development team to respond to the needs of the JavaFX community.


In Java Today, Frank Sommers of Artima Developer points out Chas Emerick's recent post Java is Dead, But You'll Learn to Love It. Frank writes:

In a recent blog post, Chas Emerick writes that,

Java-the-language is dead. Get over it, and realize that because of that fact, you'll probably come to depend upon Java more than you ever thought possible.

Emerick's point is that many systems languages--languages used very widely in creating infrastructure software--reach a level of maturity beyond which new language additions produce diminishing returns. He believes that Java has reached that point some time ago...

The discussion has been active in response to both Chas's original post and Frank's spotlighting of the post.

The java.net Java User Groups Community reported on Kirk Pepperdine's appearance last week at the NYJavaSIG:

NYJAVASIG held a meeting with notable Java Performance Tuning Expert, Kirk Pepperdine. The meeting occurred at Sun Midtown Office in NYC. Kirk discussed a wide range of Java Performance Tuning topics covering tooling, methodology, architecture, best practices, benchmarking, and memory management, all relating to real-world scenarios and problems. Frank Greco, another Java Champion, is the NYJAVASIG's founder/JUG Leader helped facilitate Kirk's appearance...

Vikram Goyal has posted a new Mobility Tech Tip, Simple Strategy for Logging and Monitoring of MIDlets:

Logging and monitoring your MIDlet in development is easy. Just print some lines on the console around critical events, and you know what is happening within your MIDlet. Integrated development environments (IDEs) such as the NetBeans IDE make this even easier by allowing you to do on-device debugging. But this is of no use to you when your MIDlet is actually being run on a client's phone. How do you monitor your killer MIDlet? Can you receive notification if something critical happens? Can you get an SMS to attend to notifications? Of course, you can. Several APIs make this possible, and this tech tip will show you how to combine them into a single interface...

In today's Weblogs, Felipe Gaucho presents The pedantic guide for a RESTful Registration Use Case:

Registration is one of most implemented use cases ever, but things get a bit different when you try to implement it in a RESTful Web-Service.

Before I start the discussion about the registration use case, a list of terms for disambiguation:

  • Application means a Java EE Application. (Arena-PUJis the Java EE Application I am doing my REST experiments)
  • Service is a RESTful Web-Service. (back-end of a Java EE Application)
  • Client Application is any software that can communicate with the Service using the HTTP Protocol. (front-end of a Java EE Application)...

Jim Driscoll is Mixing Ajax and full requests in JSF 2.0:

JSF 2.0 makes ajax pretty easy - but it can't hide everything from you... It's tempting to just add a few ajax tags into your page, and not worry too much about interactions - here's one example of a problem you may run into.

Let's say you've got a page with an input text, and a command button - like this:

   1 <h:form>
   2 <h:inputText value="#{blah.blah}">
   3 </h:inputText>
   4 <h:commandButton/>
   5 </h:form>

Now, we decide to add an ajax tag...

And Binod talks about Writing Your First SailFin CAFE Application:

How do you write a application that enables communication between two SIP phones? What if you also want to support video calling? If you are using SIP servlets, you would be writing one or two sip servlets (atleast a few hundred lines of SIP servlet code) to achieve this. But if you are using Sailfin CAFE, then things change quite dramatically. Here is the code to do all of the above, I mentioned...

In the Forums,dcrk is seeing an issue regarding MIDP-2.1 vs 2.0 devices: "I've just written a simple lwuit test app and deployed it to my LG TE365 phone. I get the error "(my app name) is not designed to work with this device and cannot be installed. -40". The specs for the phone say MIDP-2.0 while the jad..."

lyeung is working with Glassfish V2: Looking for source create-jdbc-connection-pool by xml: "Hi, I'm looking for GFv2.1-b60e source that performs the actual creation of jdbc connection pool through an xml file. From CLIDescriptor.xml, com.sun.enterprise.cli.commands.GenericCommand and com.sun.enterprise.cli.commands.S1ASCommand, I..."

And iam_peter needs to Use TrueTypeFont in SG: "hello, i checked the article from sun. took just this line of code into mine: font = Font.createFont(Font.TRUETYPE_FONT, new File("VAG Round.ttf")); font.deriveFont(30f); but after that, text is no more..."


Our current Spotlightis the JavaFX Survey. Danny Coward, reporting on the survey, said: "Don't bottle up any unexpressedopinionsabout JavaFX, take the survey. Mixed in with the usual snoozeville multichoice questions about the kind of project you work on, you get to rate the current feature set and rank the importance of new features the team's working on: tooling, more controls, performance...."


The current java.net Poll asks Which IDE do you use? The poll will run through next Thursday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Lowery's A Finite State Machine Supporting Concurrent States, which demonstrates how Java enums and EnumSets can be used as a basis to define and validate application states and state transitions. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 88: Robert Virkus of Enough Software: 'A conversation with Robert Virkus of Enough Software about J2MEPolish and the "Mobile Deverloper's Guide to the Galaxy."'


Current and upcoming Java Events:

Registered users can submit event listings for the java.net Events Page using our events submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the Java Today RSS feed. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the front page of java.net it will be archived along with other past issues in the java.net Archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
O'Reilly Media

In this past week's poll, a majority of voters expressed the view that new JVM languages are a positive development. 391 votes were cast. The exact question and results were:

What do you think about the accelerating emergence of new languages for the JVM?

  • 54% (212 votes) - It's great; they extend the flexibility of the JVM
  • 22% (87 votes) - It's an interesting development
  • 7% (22 votes) - It's irrelevant: only Java matters
  • 10% (39 votes) - Why do we need so many JVM languages?
  • 4% (15 votes) - Not good: new languages fracture the JVM
  • 3% (11 votes) - I don't know; other

Combining the first two responses, more than 3/4 of voters view the emergence of new JVM languages in a positive light. Only 4% of the voters consider new JVM languages to be a negative development.

There was one comment posted. jeeky expressed his enthusiasm over there finally being some choice in JVM languages, in "Scala - Learn it, Love it":

I've been wanting this development for years and Scala has been the language that has addressed all of my Java frustrations. Learn it, love it, don't go back!

New poll: your IDE

This week's new poll asks a very basic question: Which IDE do you use?. This is the kind of question that I think it's useful to ask periodically, so we can assess the changes in preference over time. So, what are you using on a regular basis today? Vote and let us all know!


In Java Today, Java Champion Adam Bien presents a software engineering equation for us to consider: (JSF + JPA) - EJB = BLOAT:

Without an EJB you will need for every EntityManager interaction at least 4 lines of code:

  1. tx.begin
  2. EntityManager interaction
  3. tx.commit
  4. consistent error handling +  tx.rollback

The creation and management of an EntityManager is not even included. The code will look like this...

Danny Coward has experienced JVM Language Summit inspiration:

It's hard to believe that the JVM Language Summit is only a year old, and the recent second iteration appears to have been a great success. Hopefully soon you'll be able to watch the talks online, like last year's, but in the meantime all the talk materials are online, and there are some home video style vignettes here. For a concise written summary, take a look at these short summaries of day one, day two, and day three. All the LOLs and OMGs are archived here. Organizer and JSR 292 lead John Rose was inspired by the Greats, even as sartorial inspiration was reportedly in shorter supply...

And Janice Heiss pointed me to the new SDN article Enabling Web Service Security With OpenSSO WSS Agent: Part 1, Introduction, authored by Mrudul Uchil, Kamna Jain, and Rick Palkovic:

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is one of the more promising concepts to emerge in enterprise architecture recently. SOA involves the use of loosely coupled, independent application services made available across a network. These services communicate through a standardized, platform-independent protocol that hides the underlying implementation details of each service. For example, a .NET client can access a service that is implemented in Java. By using a standardized interface language, the application that publishes a service need not know anything about the calling application. This modularization makes SOA particularly useful for enterprise and inter-enterprise architectures...

In today's Weblogs, java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry is addressing current performance issues:

java.net appears to be experiencing an ongoing DOS or SYN attack. This started a couple of days ago and our site traffic continues to be off the charts. We are currently looking for the source and are investigating which IPs we should block and for how long. There is an executive level meeting scheduled in a few hours and we should have some answers and decisions from that shortly after. As soon as we do, I'll let you know.

Binod provides some Tips on working with X-Lite and SailFin:

X-Liteconfiguration is where users commonly make mistakes while using sailfin. Here are some tips that I use while using X-Lite. Remember, this is not a guide to using X-Lite with any VOIP provider, but these are tips to use X-Lite with a SIP application server like SailFin for trying out sample applications, testing your sip application etc. Most of these are very simple, but still.....

And Carol McDonald begins her listing of The Top 10 Web Application security vulnerabilities starting with XSS:

This and the next series of blog entries will highlight the Top 10 most critical web application security vulnerabilitiesidentified by the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP). You can use OWASP's WebGoatto learn more about the OWASP Top Ten security vulnerabilties. WebGoat is an example web application, which has lessons showing "what not to do code", how to exploit the code, and corrected code for each vulnerability...

In the Forums,btasdemir has a problem where Lwuit app.uses javax.microedition.ldcui.Canvas Class freezes on Blackberry: "To whom it may concern, I build up an LWUIT application that uses a table like DataGrid, that extends javax.microedition.Canvas. I've to use a canvas because there is not a Table class in LWUIT (infact there is one but not working..."

gabox01 has a JSF navigation issue: "Hi! Here is my problem: I have list type page with two different entries. At each row, there is a "modify entry" commandLink, which opens the data in an edit page. I navigate to the edit page by passing the id of the data..."

And ratoo needs to Customize generated WSDL / Schema: "Hello, I was able to do customize generated WSDL using WSDLGeneratorExtension, but yet to find a way to customize a generated XML Schema. I am able to access to a JAXBRIContext, but can not figure out what to do next..."


Our current Spotlightis this week's Economist magazine feature on "The power of mobile money": "mobile phones have evolved in a few short years to become tools of economic empowerment for the world

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