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The Java Busstays at the top of this weekend's edition of "the Week in Review" because I was actually on the bus on its Thursday stop at Oracle's office in Burlington, MA, USA. But even at my visit to the Java Road Trip, the topic that received the most incidental conversation was Enterprise Java, and that was the topic that garnered the largest share of visibility on java.net during this past week.

If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the old and new java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Conferences, JUG Meetings

Last week's java.net poll asked Which JavaOne 2010 track will draw the greatest interest? The results suggest to me that the tracks represent the interests of a quite broad spectrum of Java developers. A total of 303 votes were cast, with the following final tally:

  • 28% (84 votes) - Core Java Platform
  • 18% (56 votes) - Desktop Java
  • 10% (31 votes) - Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
  • 9% (28 votes) - Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
  • 8% (25 votes) - JavaFX and Rich User Experience
  • 5% (15 votes) - Java ME and Mobile
  • 4% (12 votes) - Java for Devices, Card, and TV
  • 4% (11 votes) - The Java Frontier
  • 14% (41 votes) - I don't know

Geertjan Wielenga reported on his visit to Burkina Faso in Ouagadougou on the NetBeans Platform:

I'm spending today and tomorrow in Ouagadougou (pop. 1 475 223), capital of Burkina Faso, in west Africa, thanks to Constantin Drabo, who organized the NetBeans Platform Certified Training here. Here are some more pics of students on the course...

Dustin Marx is Looking Forward to JavaOne 2010:

The 2010 edition of JavaOne features numerous presentations of interest to the Java developer in subjects such as JVM languages (Groovy, JRuby, Scala, Clojure), Java concurrency, HTML5with Java, monitoring Java applications, cloud computing, modularity/OSGi,JDK7, REST/JAX-RS, Java Persistence API, NetBeans,JavaFX, and Java testing/debugging...

Jean-Francois Bonbhel announced JCertif 2010 - Last Call For Paper:

Still hesitating to join JCertif 2010 http://www.jcertif.com ? See Tasha's excellent post on Brussels JUG website http://www.brussels-jug.be/?p=785

This week's new java.net Spotlight is my blog post Notes and Pics from the Java Road Trip Stop at Burlington, MA, USA:

The Java Road Trip spent an afternoon and evening in the parking lot at Oracle's Burlington, Massachusetts, USA office on Thursday, June 24. I had been working at the data center where I do most of my programming, and I pulled in beneath noisy skies, my car splashing through the puddles, as I strained to read the signs that identified each building and parking lot. Finally, I was in the right parking lot, and I saw the bus...

This week's new java.net poll is The "Java Road Trip" is happening now in the USA. Should a world-wide "Java Jet Trip" follow? Voting will be open for the next week.


JavaEE, GlassFish

Java Champion Antonio Goncalves said Java EE 6 ? Excuse my French !

It

The Java Road Tripspent an afternoon and evening in the parking lot at Oracle's Burlington, Massachusetts, USA office on Thursday, June 24. I had been working at the data center where I do most of my programming, and I pulled in beneath noisy skies, my car splashing through the puddles, as I strained to read the signs that identified each building and parking lot. Finally, I was in the right parking lot, and I saw the bus:

Checking the radar on my BlackBerry, I saw a possibility that the storm would end before long. I was there quite early, so I assumed the event would indeed take place.

Sure enough, about 30 minutes later, things were looking up:

Soon the actual event was underway. Roger Brinkleydemonstrated some interesting devices powered by Sun SPOTs, including a set of gloves that could be used control a laptop computer. Here, a volunteer is attempting to move puzzle pieces into the correct location using the gloves, without touching the laptop's keyboard:

Here's a closer look at one of the gloves:

Because the storm scared off the food caterer, several members of the Java Road Trip crew ran out for pizza. It's arrival peeled layers of people away from demo tent. I took this picture not too long after I'd consumed a couple of pieces, attempting to capture as many of the attendees as possible in one picture:

I listened in on plenty of interesting conversations, people describing their jobs to the Java Road Trip crew, people talking about what's happening with GlassFish, the recent GlassFish release, Java EE 6... A second demonstration in the tent featured graphical analysis of garbage collection.

Inside the bus, I watched a video about the design and development of the JavaFX 2010 Winter Olympics application. I also registered as having participated in the Java Road Trip, and was gifted with a package shaped like a fat surfboard.

I chose not to open my Java Road Trip swag until I got home. Here you can see its original packaging (as it lays on top of my notes for this past week's java.net front page):

As one might expect, a tshirt packed in a rather small surfboard-shaped package is going to be a bit wrinkly when it first comes out of the package:

A couple hours earlier, just before I took off for my long drive back to Connecticut, I took this picture of the back of the Java Bus:

Goodbye, Java Bus! Thanks for visiting, Java Road Trip. Special thanks also to the New England Java Users Group for inviting the bus to visit!


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The Enterprise Architectures for Java EE Weighting Survey ends this Friday, June 25. Kate Jones of Oracle recently talked about the survey and its purpose:

We are looking to make improvements to our Java Enterprise Architect course and certification to support Java EE 6. The result of this survey will allow us to better align our Java EE architect course and certification with the role of the Java EE architect today.

The survey will take 10-15 minutes to complete.

The survey asks about several day-to-day tasks that you perform as an enterprise architect. You will be asked to rate each task in terms of four factors:

  • how frequently you perform the job (Frequency)
  • how difficult the task is to perform (Difficulty)
  • how important the task is in performing your job (Importance)
  • how difficult it is to teach people how to do (Training)

Here is the link to the survey: Certified Enterprise JavaEE Architect

The Survey closes on June 25th, 2010.

We appreciate and value your feedback!

So, if you'd like to help improve the Java Enterprise Architect course, consider taking a few minutes to participate in the survey.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

The departure of theJava Bus, the vehicle that's creating the Java Road Trip, propelled the "Conferences, JUG Meetings" topic to the fore on java.net this past week. I'll be at the Burlington, MA bus stop this coming Thursday, June 24. I'm an observor, not an actual participant in the Java Road Trip. I'll be wearing a a tshirt from JavaOne 2009, with a Java cup and java.net on the left, in case you'd like to converse with me.

If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the old and new java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Programming

Kirk Pepperdine presented his reactions to a presentation by Holly Cummings, and elaborates, in Holly at the Paris JUG:

Last Tuesday night I managed to catch up with Holly Cummings at the Paris JUG. Her talks are generally filled with lots of good information and this one was no exception. It was filmed so if you google about you might be able to catch an online version. As much as I liked the presentation, it left me with the feeling that performance tuning was a very murky or ambiguous activity...

DeveloperWorks featured Ted Neward's 5 things you didn't know about ... JARs:

For most Java developers, JAR files and their specialized cousins, WARs and EARs, are simply the end result of a long Ant or Maven process. It's standard procedure to copy the JAR to the right place on the server (or, more rarely, the user's machine) and forget about it. Actually, JARs can do more than store source code, but you have to know what else is possible, and how to ask for it. The tips in this installment of the 5 things series will show you how to make the most of Java Archive files...

Stephen Colebourne wrote about Exception transparency and Lone-Throws

The Project Lambda mailing list has been considering exception transparency recently. My fear with the proposal in this area is that the current proposal goes beyond what Java's complexity budget will allow. So, I proposed an alternative. Exception transparency: Exception transparency is all about checked exceptions and how to handle them around a closure/lambda. Firstly, its important to note that closures are a common feature in other programming languages...

Collin Fagan continued a series with StringTemplate Part 4:Generating a Builder Class using StringTemplate -

Parts 1, 2 and 3 introduced StringTemplate through the use of simple SQL, HTML and plain text examples. This article switches gears and attempts to use StringTemplate to generate a more complicated text output: Java source code.

Conferences, JUG Meetings

Last week's java.net Spotlight was the Java Road Trip: Code to Coast -

Java developers, architects, programmers, and enthusiasts: get ready for a real adrenaline rush. Check back here often to follow the Java Road Trip: Code to Coast tour as we journey to 20 cities across the United States showcasing Oracle's commitment to everything Java. Heading up the tour are key Java technologists from Oracle, who will be demonstrating the latest Java software, engaging with Java User Group (JUG) members, and meeting with enterprise developers and consumers...

You've heard about the just-started Java Road Trip, right? So,What's On the Bus?

At each stop along its route, the Java bus team will unpack its tents and show off recent developments in Java technology, including Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 6, which was released in December 2009 with functionality that makes developing and deploying enterprise and Web applications easier. Demonstrated Technologies: Other demonstrated technologies include four applications based on the JavaFX platform, which provides a unified development and deployment model for building expressive rich internet applications across browsers, desktops, mobile devices, and TVs. These include...

Arun Gupta presented his Über Conf Day 1 Trip Report:

Jay Zimmerman kick started the 200th No Fluff Just Stuff event and Day 1 of Über Confearlier today. This event is focused on alpha-geeks, with more access to speakers, more hands-on workshops, longer hours, and attendees from 45 different states. Cliff Click gave a great keynote talking about Challenges and Directions in Java Virtual Machines. Here are some key points from his talk...

Stephen Chin presented Bay Area JUG Round-Up and Stuart’s Hands-on JavaFX Videos Available:

I am pleased to annouhttp://blogs.sun.com/alexismp/entry/glassfish_ose_3_0_1nce that we have a couple new videos available on the Silicon Valley JavaFX User Group (SvJugFx) video site. Here is a link to the landing page where you can watch these videos as well as all our previous sessions: http://web.ubivent.com/svjugfx.htmlThe first new video is a Hands-On JavaFX Lab given by Stuart Marks, core JavaFX team member, and regular SvJugFx attendee. This was our most successful meeting so far for the local audience, because it filled in the gap between the very technical rich presentations we started with and the experience level of the attendees. The entire flood tutorial was published as an HTML document, but it is much more entertaining to see Stuart do it first hand...

Arun Gupta presented his Uber Conf 2010 - Day 3 Report. After an early morning run, Arun:

Attended a 3 hour Scala for Java Programmers Workshop by Venkat and extensive notes + code samples on that are available here. The next interesting talk I attended was on Emergent Design by Neal Ford and here are the key points: Emergent Design is about finding idiomatic patterns (technical and domain) in your code that already exists...

This week's new java.net poll asks Which JavaOne 2010 track will draw the greatest interest? The poll will be open for the next week.


JavaEE, GlassFish

The July/August issue Oracle Magazine includes an interesting article by Bob Rhubart, Panning for Gold: Finding real value in conversations about enterprise architecture -

Everybody’s talking about enterprise architecture (EA). The conversations are happening in offices and meeting rooms and on blogs and social networks and everywhere else IT professionals congregate in the real and virtual worlds. And while all that jawboning does a great job of increasing awareness of what most would agree is an issue of no small importance, how much of it has any real value in helping organizations implement and benefit from EA? ...

Adam Bien looked ahead to A French and Free Java EE 6 Week - Some Slides, More Code:

The free Java EE 6 events in the week of 05.07-09.07.2010 will start at July the 6th in Paris. I will give a (hopefully openspace-like / interactive) presentation with the title Lightweight Killer Apps with Nothing But Vanilla Jahttp://jfarcand.wordpress.com/2010/06/15/using-atmospheres-jquery-plug-in-to-build-applicationsupporting-both-websocket-and-comet/va EE 6

 

In the same week I will give a releated presentation Java EE 6 - Leaner Than POJOs in Nice. Java EE 6 is so lightweight - that it may look overly complicated on slides. For that reason I will spend the majority of the time in the IDE...

Jean-Francois Arcand demonstrated Using Atmosphere’s JQuery Plug In to build applications supporting both Websocket and Comet:

Until all Browsers and WebServers properly supports theWebsocket protocol, it will be difficult to write portable asynchronous applications. Not anymore, using the new JQuery Atmosphere Plugin which is able to auto-detect which transport (Websocket or Comet) to use based on what the Browser and Web Server support. Since the Websocket protocol is relatively new, not all web servers and browser supports it which means writing a websocket application always lock your users with a limited set of browsers and web server. For example, as of today, only Jetty 8, Resin 4 and GlassFish 3.1 supports Websocket on the server side, and Chrome 4 and Safari 5 on client side. Eventually they may all support the protocol, but it will take a couple of years before it happens...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart expressed his excitement about GlassFish participation in The Java Road Trip:

The Java Road Trip started on Monday.  According to the schedule, today was the second day in New York City. Then the tour goes to Philadelphia, Burlington,Providence, Washington, DC, and keeps going until Santa Claraon August 18th. Thanks to Arun's coordination, GlassFish will be well represented: Justin, Siraj, KenP, Tom and Bobby, as well as Arun, will be at some of the stops...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announced GlassFish 3.0.1 is out - Delivering on the community roadmap promise:

About three months ago, this RoadMap document was presented to the community and by all means it was well accepted (downloads approaching five digits). Now, while roadmaps are great, releases are even better. So, I'm happy to say that GlassFish 3.0.1 has been released as expected. Not only the open source version but also the commercially supported Oracle GlassFish 3.0.1 product as well as an update to the Java EE 6 SDK integrating this new version of the runtime...

Tools, IDEs, etc.

Hudson Labs announced Hudson 1.362 Released:

The 1.362 release of Hudson has a few bug-fixes and a few minor enhancements, all together a good stabilization release. Not too much interesting to discuss so straight on to the changelog! Bugs: * Allow multiple dependencies between same two projects, as they may trigger under different conditions and with different parameters. (issue 5708); * Timeline on build trend page should use server timezone instead of always GMT. (issue 6692) ...

Ashley R. Lux described Triggering Hudson builds with Mercurial hooks:

Mercurial offers a variety of hooks, powerful triggers that can be configured to automatically perform automated tasks after an event occurs in a repository. We can leverage Mercurial’s changegrouphook to make Hudson build a project without polling the version control system for changes. This offers some important advantages and disadvantages. One advantages of triggering builds after hg push is to decrease the load on the Mercurial server and Hudson itself by not polling every 1-60 minutes and use the server when necessary. Of course the fewer projects you have the less this technique buys you. Another advantage is to lower the feedback loop from Hudson; every minute spent waiting for Hudson to poll Mercurial the longer the feedback loop gets. There are some important disadvantages to this technique too...

The NetBeans team announced NetBeans IDE 6.9 Now Available for Download!

With support for the JavaFX Composer, OSGi interoperability, PHP Zend, Ruby on Rails 3.0 and more, download NetBeans 6.9 today and discover the smart way to code! NetBeans IDE 6.9 Features; NetBeans IDE 6.9 Tutorials; NetBeans Platform 6.9...

I've chosen this annoucement to be this week's new java.net Spotlight.


Platforms, Frameworks

Geertjan Wielenga posted a three-part series titled Mona Lisa Puzzle:

If Mona Lisa was a puzzle... this would define her:class PuzzleScene extends ObjectScene { ...

Srikanth Shenoy investigated Wiring JavaFX objects with Spring - Tread with Caution:

I recently used Spring to wire JavaFX objects and found wiring JavaFX CustomNodes has a potential gotcha. Here is the catch phrase for the day "JavaFX and Spring are indeed a very good match, but there is a little catch"

Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein talked about Sequences: JavaFX Script's Next Challenge?

I was doing some JavaFX hacking, and I had to create a sequence initially full of zeros. How can you do that? There's apparently only one way...

JVM, JDK, JSRs

Jeff Friesen's Exploring JDK 7, Part 4: New I/O: The Next Generation was published on the informIT site:

Oracle’s release of JDK 7 is expected to occur this coming fall. This new release will offer a suite of new features for you to learn. This final article in a four-part series that introduces you to some of these features presents the next generation of New I/O...

Dalibor Topic presented the latest OpenJDK News (2010-06-11):

The JDK 7 build 97 is available. Build 97 contains changes in corba, langtools and jdk areas, adding support for OpenType/CFF fonts, the XRender Java2D pipeline feature, and support for reading of concatenated gzip files, as well as a set of improvements across the class library. You can check out the list of changesfor details, and get the source code. On the Project Lambdamailing list Brian Goetz posted his thoughts on exception transparency, one of the features being considered for that project. In addition, the draftfor 'defender methods' has been updated...

Joe Darcy talked about Project Lambda Syntax Sin Tax:

In various forums, recent discussion about Project Lambda have commented on, and often noted in dismay, the current syntax for lambda expressions in the initial prototype. "Don't panic!" is advice as valid for work on language evolution as on any other endeavor. Since syntax is the easiest aspect of a language change to form an opinion on, it is the aspect of language changes most susceptible to bikeshedding. While syntax is an important component of language changes, it is far from the only important component; the semantics matter too! Fixation on the syntax of a feature early in its development is premature and counterproductive. Having a prototype to gain actual experience with the feature is more valuable than continued informed analysis and commentary without working code. I believe this diagram included in a talk on the Project Coin language change process holds for language changes in Java more generally...

Open Source Projects

Last week's java.net poll was Do you participate in open source software (OSS) development?209 votes were cast, with the following result:

  • 6% (12 votes) - My company pays me to work on OSS
  • 24% (51 votes) - I develop code for open source projects without being paid
  • 8% (16 votes) - I test new OSS versions and report bugs
  • 21% (44 votes) - I'd participate in OSS development if I had time
  • 34% (72 votes) - I use OSS
  • 1% (2 votes) - I'm not interested in OSS
  • 2% (5 votes) - I don't know
  • 3% (7 votes) - Other

Ludovic Poitou announced that OpenDS 2.3.0-build003 is now available...:

We have just uploaded OpenDS 2.3.0-build003, a new snapshot from the development branch of the OpenDS project, to the promoted-build repository. OpenDS 2.3.0-build003 is built from revision 6502 of our source tree. The direct link to download the core server is: http://www.opends.org/promoted-builds/2.3.0-build003/OpenDS-2.3.0-build003.zip...

Mobile

Fabrizio Giudici discussed Android, "marketing" strategies and the difficult art of talking to people:

After about one month from its appearance on the Android Market, blueBill Mobile experienced more than 150 downloads and a 50% of active installs. I'm using this project also to learn new things about the way to communicating to end users. In fact, from this point of view blueBill Mobile is very different from blueMarine (my other project targeted at end customers): people installing an open...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

A broad mix of topics were highlighted on java.net in this past week, with programming techniques, the Java language, and conferences/JUGs receiving the most attention in Java Today news items and blog posts. If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the old and new java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


JavaEE, GlassFish

http://blogs.sun.com/alexismp/resource/five2-small.png 

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine said "Happy Birthday!" in Remember June 2005? GlassFish turns 5!

When it comes to application servers, 5 years is both a loooong time and probably also still the beginning of the story. In June 2005, I wasn't yet part of the GlassFish team but I knew a number of people in the group and had been using Sun's application servers for the longest time. I had become excited again about Sun's plans when the decision to make the RI production quality was taken (Sun App Server 7 days). Interestingly enough, the first one ever to blog about GlassFish was JBoss' Marc Fleury...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announced a chance for you to Get As to your Qs - GlassFish Community Update on Tuesday:

This Tuesday, June 8th, 9am PT (TZ converter), we will host another GlassFish Community Update. We will use GlassFish TV at uStream, like our previous update - you just need to point your browser to the channel (additional show info).  uStream (still?) uses a Flash client - the App Store says there is an iPad client but reviews suggest it might not work on this channel...

Eduardo also analyzed GlassFish Under Oracle - Mailing Lists Trends:

We regularly track adoption using a number of metrics and report back, so... how are things going under Oracle? First a caveat that these are early days in our integration and a number of infrastructure issues (location of web pages, underlying services) are in transition. This is most apparent in downloads but downloads also impacts other indicators. I don't expect things to settle down until late in the year, but I wanted to report on the current status...

Juliano Viana discovered that ThreadLocal + Thread Pool = bad idea (or: dealing with an apparent Glassfish memory leak):

One of the not-so-great things about developing Java web applications is the fact that, after a few redeployments, sooner or later the web container JVM needs to be restarted due to Out Of Memory errors. This has been true in every combination of development environment and web server I have used so far, and until last week Netbeans 6.8 + Glassfish 3.0.1 was no exception. The cause of Out Of...

Tools, IDEs, etc.

Geerjan Wielenga noted that REST Integration is a Piece of Cake on the NetBeans Platform:

Integration of REST resources into NetBeans Platform applications is trivial in 6.9

The Java Road Trip: Code to Coast is something we haven't seen before. A "Java Bus" will be traveling to 20 cities across the United States:

Heading up the tour are key Java technologists from Oracle, who will be demonstrating the latest Java software, engaging with Java User Group (JUG) members, and meeting with enterprise developers and consumers.
http://blogs.oracle.com/otn/bus1.jpg 

Justin Kestelyn of the Oracle Technology Network elaborates:

What is the Java Road Trip? Basically, we have packed a rock-star bus with demos (Java FX, Oracle ADF, Java EE 6, JDK 7, GlassFish, Java ME) and are putting it on the road; it will make 20 stops across the U.S. in the next couple of months (and MAY may make a special appearance at JavaOne, if we can find a big enough parking space). In many cases these stops will coincide with Java or Oracle user group meet-ups and will always involve beer, food, and free stuff. Furthermore, engineers from HQ will be flying out at various times to rendezvous with these meet-ups and answer your questions.

The trip starts in New York on Monday, June 14, and ends in Santa Clara, CA on August 18. I plan to visit the bus when it's in Burlington, MA on June 24.

You can follow the bus on Twitter by searching for the javaroadtriptag.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The JavaOne and Oracle Develop Registration page includes some basic information about blogger passes. Unlike recent years, blogger passes to JavaOne will not be availble through java.net. Instead, if you'd like a blogger pass, you'll need to follow the registration procedure listed on the page.

The listed requirements for getting a blogger pass for JavaOne / Oracle Develop don't include the word "Java":

"Please include a URL for your blog when registering for the event. Blogs should pertain to Oracle products and solutions and include postings within the last month about the company in order to be considered for approval."

My guess is that this is an oversight on the part of whoever put together the page. Since

"JavaOne and Oracle Develop covers topics essential to the technology community and provides hands-on learning focused on Java and next-generation development, including rich internet applications (RIAs), service-oriented architecture (SOA), and the database"

surely they want bloggers who write about these topics, not only bloggers who write about Oracle products and solutions.

With JavaOne / Oracle Develop just three months away, if you'd like to apply for a blogger pass, the time to do so is probably now.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

This past week, java.net's Java Today news items and blog posts had a greater than usual focus on conferences (mostly due to Jazoon) and JVM/JDK/JSRs. If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the old and new java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


JavaEE, GlassFish

Last week's java.net Spotlight was Jiandong Guo's Enterprise Tech Tip, Security Token Service and Identity Delegation with Metro:

Metro is a high performance, extensible, easy-to-use web services stack. It combines the JAX-WS reference implementation with Web Services Interoperability Technology (WSIT), an implementation of numerous WS-* standards to enable interoperability with other implementations and to provide Quality of Service (QOS) features such as security, reliability, and transaction support...

Arun Gupta presented TOTD #139: Asynchronous Request Processing using Servlets 3.0 and Java EE 6:

Server resources are always valuable and should be used conservatively. Consider a Servlet that has to wait for a JDBC connection to be available from the pool, receiving a JMS message or reading a resource from the file system. Waiting for a "long running" process to completely blocks the thread - waiting, sitting and doing nothing - not an optimal usage of your server resources. Servlets 3.0 introduces the ability to asynchronously process requests such that the control (or thread) is returned back to the container to perform other tasks while waiting for the long running process to complete...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announced GlassFish 3.1 M1 Available: Binaries, Demos and Screencasts:

Milestone 1 of the GlassFish 3.1 Open Source Edition is now available from our promoted page as 3.1-b02: full distro (unix, windows, zip) and web distro (unix, windows, zip). GlassFish has been following a Milestone model for many years and it works very well; for 3.1 we are documenting better each milestone (M1 content) and adding two new twists: demos to explain the new features, and community updates to enable Q&A...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announced two new GlassFish Podcast(s) - App Versioning with the Serli team:

Following up on a recent post about an external contribution to GlassFish 3.1, we now have not just one, but two episodes talking with the Serli team that worked on the application versioning feature for GlassFish 3.1...

Zarar Siddiqi talked about Integrating EclipseLlink with EhCache to cache ReadAll and Native Queries:

The problem at hand is that EclipseLink (great project lead by James Sutherland) does not use a query cache when dealing with ReadAll queries, i.e: all calls to getResultList() go to the database. Some object-level caching is performed by avoiding construction of new objects based on the primary key values the database call returns. EclipseLink compares the PK values returned by the...

Tools, IDEs, etc.

On the programming education front, Mik profiled BlueJ 3.0

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