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Last week, I announced my plan to start taking virtual trips to "GlassFish Outposts" -- regions of the world that are fairly isolated, remote from where most of us live. Thanks to the internet, however, these places are just as connected as any of us. And, as the GlassFish Usage Map shows us, there are plenty of developers in these places.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5e/Whitehorse_Yukon.JPG/200px-Whitehorse_Yukon.JPG
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada

Today I'm visiting Whitehorse, located on Mile 918 of the Alaska Highway, in Canada's Yukon Territory (latitude 61 North, longitude 135 West). Whitehorse is the capital of the Yukon Territory, and has a population of just over 20,000. There's a chance of rain today, and afternoon temperatures will be in the low teens (C) [upper 50s F].

Anyway, I think perhaps multiple people are running GlassFish in Whitehorse as we speak. Here's the GlassFish image and data for the Whitehorse region:

In this view, I believe the "Stats For Visible Area" is giving us the number of Admin hits to the GlassFish.org site. There were 883 total recorded hits as of July 2010 (I don't know when the start date for recording Admin hits was). Through March 2010, there were 854 admin hits. So, a lot of the GlassFish work was apparently done in Whitehorse prior to March. Checking the GlassFish Admin IPs statistic through July 2010, we see a value of 16 - which I believe means GlassFish has been deployed on at least 16 different systems in the Whitehorse area at one time or another. One new Admin IP was registered in July 2010.

So, who's using GlassFish in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory?

The fact that Whitehorse is the territory's capital hints at the possibility that someone in government may be deploying GlassFish. Another possibility is Yukon College, which offers an Information Technology program. There is also a summer cadet program that might be a possibility. Other possibilities include the hydroelectric power plants, or the mining or forestry companies.

If you are a GlassFish user from Whitehorse, please leave a comment below and let us know what you're working on. We'd love to hear from you!

Java Today

On the JavaOne Conference Blog, java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry highlights Java.net Activities at JavaOne:

I'm excited about JavaOne this year.  It's going to be different in a lot of ways, but we are doing our best to ensure that the Java.net presence for the community is just as good if not better then previous years.  In years past Java.net has had a "community corner" booth in the JavaOne pavilion at Moscone. It was always a little bit of a weird fit, to have a community space plonked down in the middle (or the corner) of this big space mostly dedicated to marketing. This time we'll be housed in the Mason Street tent, which will be a large comfortable space for people from all of the technology communities to hang out, pick up swag, watch the videocasts, and see some live events too...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine is Back from Brazza:

I was fortunate enough to visit Congo Brazzaville (just celebrating their 50 years of existence) to present at the jCertif conference, probably the biggest Java event in central Africa. I was expecting an adventure and an experience. I wasn't disappointed. So of course this is Africa and I probably shouldn't be surprised to see children cross the runway only seconds after the plane had landed. The food (fish, meat, chicken and bananas!) was great and the crowd welcoming. I had had a taste of what to expect when chatting withMax Bonbhel, the organizer of the conference, a leader of the CongoJUG (great logo btw), and overal an entrepreneur...

Hudson Labs announces a Pre-JavaOne Hudson Meetup:

As we near autumn up here in the Northern Hemisphere, the wind is starting to blow a bit chillier and here in the Bay Area that can only mean one thing: Oracle is suing everybody! it's time for JavaOne! A whole lot has changed since last year, Sun Microsystems was acquired by Oracle, Kohsuke left Snoracle to found InfraDNA and Hudson has continued topower on as the single best continuous integration server on the planet...

Terrence Barr published a Quick post: Some interesting links …

Just some interesting links I stumbled over during the last two weeks or so: Al Hilwa: “Q & A: What’s Oracle-Google Lawsuit All About?”; Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein: “Android = Java”; Andreas Constantinou: “Is Android Evil?”; Jason Hiner: “The dirty little secret about Google Android”; Wall Street Journal: “Google and the Search for the Future”...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What threat does further fragmentation of the Java language pose? Voting will be open until Monday.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Hudson Labs news, CloudBees announce Hudson-as-a-Service:

CloudBees announced the beta availability of their new Hudson-as-a-service "HaaS" today. I see this as yet another validation to Hudson, and as such, I welcome this new addition to the community and wish them well! — more companies betting on Hudson means we'll get more investment to the project, which is all goodness for Hudson users...

We're also spotlighting Community Manager Sonya Barry's blog post Tell me what you think:

"For several years now I've been involved in on-again, off-again plans to do a major upgrade to the site. This time it's really happening. People are working on building out the new site now, and we're going to start rolling out the migration plan here once the first tests are complete. Our goal for migration...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

According to this past week's java.net poll, developers expect to hear details of the strategy and direction plans for a broad spectrum of Java technologies at the "Java Strategy and Directions" JavaOne keynote. The keynote, at 5:45 PM Pacific Time on Monday, September 20, will feature Thomas Kurian, Executive Vice President, Product Development, at Oracle.

Here's the keynote description:

Since its inception, Java has expanded relentlessly in bringing the power of secure, connected computing to the activities of everyday life. Java is the force behind applications and devices important to every aspect of both our professional and personal worlds

Two news items attest to the traction Hudson is gaining in the automated build market. Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Hudson Labs announcement CloudBees announce Hudson-as-a-Service. What's CloudBees? Here's the vision statement from their Welcome to CloudBees blog post:

At CloudBees we think that the cloud is the new platform, where applications will shift to over time. Yet, for this to happen en masse, true cloud-nativeinfrastructure has to be available – this cannot be a mere packaging of existing products with a “cloud” stamp on it. As we shift towards this new paradigm, CloudBees aims at becoming the leading Platform as a Service (PaaS) for Java applications. And while CloudBees' platform will initially appeal to end-user companies,our platform is built with ISVs in mind: we envision thatmost ISVs will have to morph into a SaaS model if they want to outlive their SaaS competitors. Yet, given the complexity involved, very few ISVs will find it viable to develop their own multi-tenant architecture.Furthermore, CloudBees will not just focus on a production-time Java PaaS: we will deliver an offering that covers the complete applications' lifecycle, from dev to production, through staging and QA.

Kohsuke Kawaguchi, who announced the CloudBees news on the Hudson Labs blog, said:

I see this as yet another validation to Hudson, and as such, I welcome this new addition to the community and wish them well! — more companies betting on Hudson means we'll get more investment to the project, which is all goodness for Hudson users. ... Hosted Hudson offers an interesting trade-off, compared to on-premise Hudson. On the plus side, given the current hourly pricing of public clouds like EC2 and Rackspace, you get a better pricing model, as CloudBees charge by minutes. You also get rid of machines and upfront cost, which is great for small business. On top of that, you can also expect them to gradually develop more value-adds and better integration to various other pieces, which can get really interesting.

On Twitter, @kohsukekawa also pointed out the interesting graph below, from the job search site Indeed.job:

Hudson is clearly on the rise.


Java Today

Dustin Marx is following More JavaOne 2010 Blogs and Articles:

Several more interesting blogs and articles on JavaOne 2010 have been published recently.  In this blog post, I point to and summarize some of these. In Oracle Takes Over JavaOne Conference, Paul Krill discusses several themes, both advertised and unadvertised, that are likely to prevail at JavaOne.  He alludes to the recent announcement that Oracle CEO Larry Ellison would join Executive Vice President Thomas Kurian for the JavaOne 2010 opening keynote ("Java Strategy and Directions").  James Sugrue highlights this keynote in One Keynote You Won't Want to Miss and there are numerous interesting comments on that post's feedback.  Krill also references the later JavaOne keynote that boats Mark Reinhold as a contributor...

On developerWorks, Masahiko Maedera investigates Unicode surrogate programming with the Java language:

Since version 1.5, the Java™ language has provided APIs supporting Unicode supplementary characters that can't be represented by a single 16-bit char data type. This article discusses the features of these APIs, shows their correct usage, and evaluates their processing performance...

Neal Gafter presents A couple of comments on Defender Methods:

Brian Goetz has posted version 3 of his proposal "Defender Methods", which is a way of adding methods to existing interfaces without breaking binary compatibility. Generally speaking, I think the idea is sound but I think there are some problems with the proposal in its current form. I would normally post my comments on the proposal to the lambda-dev mailing list, which ensures that any IP embedded in my comments are formally submitted to Oracle's ownership. However, Oracle's recent lawsuit against Google has made it clear that, even though I am a contributor to openjdk7, I do not have a license to Oracle's patents that are necessarily infringed by the use of the openjdk7 source base. This is a very confusing position for the organizer of an open-source effort to take. Rather than continuing to contribute IP directly to the project, I'll post my comments here and contribute them to Oracle once it is clear that I've been granted a license to the patents necessary to use openjdk7...

The JavaOne Conference Blog invites us to Meet Duchess at JavaOne:

Regina Ten Bruggencate and several other Duchesses are joining JavaOne this year as Java User Group leaders, unconference presenters and TechCast interviewees. Regina is a 12 year Java developer veteran. She is a very versatile Java consultant and has worked for a range of industries such as financial institutions, retail, government and transportation and she is now working for a large international airport in the Netherlands...

Poll

The topic of the current java.net poll is the "JavaOne Strategy and Directions" Keynote, which will feature Larry Ellison and Thomas Kurian. Our poll asks: Which area will receive the most attention in the JavaOne "Java Strategy and Directions" keynote? The poll will be open until Monday.


Spotlights

Our new java.net Spotlight is the Hudson Labs news, CloudBees announce Hudson-as-a-Service:

CloudBees announced the beta availability of their new Hudson-as-a-service "HaaS" today. I see this as yet another validation to Hudson, and as such, I welcome this new addition to the community and wish them well! — more companies betting on Hudson means we'll get more investment to the project, which is all goodness for Hudson users...

We're also spotlighting Community Manager Sonya Barry's blog post Tell me what you think:

"For several years now I've been involved in on-again, off-again plans to do a major upgrade to the site. This time it's really happening. People are working on building out the new site now, and we're going to start rolling out the migration plan here once the first tests are complete. Our goal for migration...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

While looking at the latest GlassFish map Monday night, I started wondering about some of the dots that appear in fairly remote locations on the globe. (My apologies to those who live in these locations -- of course, they're not "remote" to you!) In fact, I see quite a lot of dots in places I've long wanted to visit, like the Arctic, islands in the Pacific Ocean, the Carribean Islands, Africa, and Teirra del Fuego.

Since I may never get the chance to actually visit these places in person, I've decided to "follow the GlassFish Trail" (like the explorers of old) and make virtual visits in a new blog series to be called "GlassFish Outposts."

So, get ready for some adventure. I'm packing my bags today, getting ready for my first journey. Who knows where it will take me!?

And if we're lucky, when I get there, maybe some of the GlassFish denizens of those locations will post comments introducing us to their GlassFish projects!


Java Today

Adrian Deccico investigates Concurrency in Hudson:

Hi, the following Groovy script checks if there is any other job waiting for an executor or being executed in that precise moment. It can be useful if you eventually want to launch an exclusive task, like reloading Hudson

What do you think of the java.net site? java.net's Sonya Barry asks that question in her latest Community Manager blog post, Tell me what you think, which I'm currently featuring as a java.net Spotlight.

From Sonya's post:

For several years now I've been involved in on-again, off-again plans to do a major upgrade to the site. This time it's really happening. People are working on building out the new site now, and we're going to start rolling out the migration plan here once the first tests are complete... I'm really excited that beyond that, the new site will be developed by an agile team, so we can try new things and be in a state of constant improvement across the site. Adding new features won't be a years-long process any more. Since we've got this going I think it's a good time to ask you all, what do you think of the site? I'm looking for constructive criticism here. Tell me what is wrong and what could be fixed, or what you love and want to stay the same forever and always. My goal here is to cast the widest possible net...

So, if you've got some ideas about the java.net site, consider posting a comment to Sonya's post.


Java Today

In the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine talks about GlassFish RESTful administration progress in 3.1:

Complete administration, from web console to rich command line (asadmin) has always been a strong set of features in GlassFish and often a key differentiator versus other application servers. Jason Lee takes you in his blog entry through the basics and the recent development of a more recent administration feature - the RESTful admin interface...

Arun Gupta provides TOTD #144: CDI @Produces for container-managed @Resource -

Contexts & Dependency Injection (CDI) in Java EE 6 provides type-safe dependency injection. The type-safety part comes from the fact that no String-based identifiers are used for dependency injection. Instead CDI runtime uses the typing information that is already available in the Java object model. Java EE 5 already had resource injection available in terms of PersistenceContext, PersistenceUnit, Resource, and others. But they require String-based identifiers to identify the resource to be injected. For example...

Kirk Pepperdine writes about verbose gc logging:

I ran into an interesting question regarding gc logging in production. The production team was hesitant to turn on gc logging because the claimed that it created a significant drag on performance. GC logging is an important aspect of monitoring application health and should be turned on in all production systems. GC logging represents less than a 1% drag on performance. That said, -verbose:gc logs to stdout. If that has not been redirected to a file, you'll also incur the cost of writing to the console and that can be a drag on performance...

On developerWorks, Ted Neward continues his series with 5 things you didn't know about ... Command-line flags for the JVM:

Java™ virtual machines come with hundreds of command-line options, which more experienced Java developers can use to tune the Java runtime. Learn how to monitor and log compiler performance, disable explicit garbage collection (System.gc();), extend the JRE, and more...

Poll

The topic of the current java.net poll is the "JavaOne Strategy and Directions" Keynote, which will feature Larry Ellison and Thomas Kurian. Our poll asks: Which area will receive the most attention in the JavaOne "Java Strategy and Directions" keynote? The poll will be open until next Mondy.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Community Manager Sonya Barry's blog post Tell me what you think:

"For several years now I've been involved in on-again, off-again plans to do a major upgrade to the site. This time it's really happening. People are working on building out the new site now, and we're going to start rolling out the migration plan here once the first tests are complete. Our goal for migration...

We're also currently highlighting the JavaOne Conference Blog's announcement of the JavaOne and Oracle Develop Unconference as a java.net Spotlight:

In addition to the power packed "official" sessions ofJavaOne and Oracle Develop, there will be an unconference that runs in conjunction with the main conference from Monday-Thursday at the Parc 55 hotel. If you want to lead a session, you can register your session in the currently open three tracks at the unconference website write an abstractto get others interested in your session...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

The topic for this week's new poll is the "JavaOne Strategy and Directions" Keynote, which will feature Larry Ellison and Thomas Kurian. Our poll asks: Which area will receive the most attention in the JavaOne "Java Strategy and Directions" keynote? The poll will be open for the next week.

Last week's poll result

The poll that just closed asked Will you be attending JavaOne 2010?. A total of 143 votes were cast, with the following results:

  • 7% (10 votes) - I'll be presenting at JavaOne
  • 20% (29 votes) - Yes
  • 11% (16 votes) - I plan to attend a non-US JavaOne
  • 59% (84 votes) - No
  • 3% (4 votes) - I don't know

Of course, it's not a surprise that a majority of the voters won't be attending JavaOne this year. It's good to see a level of interest in the upcoming non-US JavaOne's.

I will be at JavaOne myself, and I hope to see many people from our java.net community. I'll be at the java.net area under the tent when I'm not attending sessions. I intend to blog quite a lot from the conference. I'll use both twitter and java.net blogs to post my schedule in advance, in case you'd like to meet up before or after a session, or at the java.net area under the tent.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The news on java.net this past week covered a broad swath. Surprisingly, there wasn't much news related to JavaOne, even though that's now less than a month away. Perhaps everyone who will be presenting at JavaOne is hard at work on their presentations. Then, too, many people (including several people who blog on java.net) found their attention drawn to the new Oracle lawsuit.

If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the week's java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Conferences, JUG Meetings

Our last java.net poll asked What type of technical conference sessions are most valuable? A total of 111 votes were cast, with the following results:

  • 5% (5 votes) - Keynote addresses
  • 3% (3 votes) - Panel sessions
  • 59% (65 votes) - Technical sessions
  • 10% (11 votes) - BOF (birds of a feather) sessions
  • 3% (3 votes) - Other
  • 22% (24 votes) - I don't know

Elaborating on the last java.net poll question, Dustin Marx posted his views on the Most Valuable Type of Conference Session:

The Java.net poll question this past week has been, "What type of technical conference sessions are most valuable?"  The options that can be selected for this poll question are Keynote Addresses, Panel Sessions, Technical Sessions, Birds of a Feather (BOF) Sessions, Other, and "I Don't Know."  As of this writing, there have been just over one hundred responses with 60% favoring Technical Sessions followed by the "I Don't Know" option being in second place with 20% of the responses.  I don't recall seeing many poll questions where this option is so high.  The next highest type of conference session after Technical Sessions's 60% is Birds of a Feather Sessions with 10%.  There are potential advantages associated with each of these session types as well as risks and drawbacks for each session.  In this post, I look at each of these types of sessions based on my previous experiences with them...

The JavaOne Conference Blog presented an update: JavaOne has Something for Architects, too, two:

We've already mentioned that there is plenty for architects to do at JavaOne 2010, including the more than 50 sessions in the Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud track. But that's only a part of the story. Since JavaOne and Oracle Develop registration is a two-fer, you'll have access to even more sessions and events that will appeal to your architectural interests. For instance, there are nearly 40 sessions in Oracle Develop's Service-Oriented Architecture track and more than 30 sessions in Develop's Application Grid and Oracle WebLogic track.  So between the three tracks mentioned here you're looking at nearly 120 sessions covering topics relevant to software architects...

JavaEE, GlassFish

Arun Gupta posted Java EE 6 & GlassFish workshop delivered at San Francisco JUG - Slides & Demos available:

Roberto and I delivered a 2-part Java EE 6 & GlassFish 3 workshop to a packed San Francisco JUG meetup last week. There were about 80 attendees on Day 1 and about 40 on Day 2. Over approximately 7 hours, we gave a preview of Java EE 6, explained the key technologies introduced in the platform, and did lot of coding using NetBeans IDE. Roberto's slides are given below...

In TheAquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine provided advice for those who'd enjoy Spending quality time with the Java EE 6 Tutorial(s):

If you're finding summer to be a good time to learn something new, you could look at the Java EE 6 tutorial. This book makes for a complete and detailed reference for anyone wanting to learn and use Java EE 6. What is now available is the first part of the tutorial with the second part out soon before JavaOne (September 2010). A recent episode of the Oracle Author Podcasts explains what to expect and how the tutorial is structured...

Adam Bien responded to an interesting Mail of the Week: What I Can and Cannot Do with Java EE 6 -

Got an interesting email with questions regarding Java EE restrictions. Some answers: "I have installed Glassfish 3.0.1 and am using NetBeans 6.9.1 for implementing stuff" -- Congrats - you saved about 5h :-). I have a web service running on Glassfish. What can I do now to access an RMI based server? Can I do this: HelloWorldRMI hdl = (HelloWorldRMI) Naming.lookup("rmi://localhost:2000/HelloWorldRMI"); String helloString = hdl.sayHello("WS");...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart invited us to visit the GlassFish CafePress Store - Purveyors to the Community Since 2007:

The GlassFish Giftshop has been around since 2007; it currently includes several t-shirts, mugs, stickers and Sigg Water Bottles.  JavaOne(our "best"-selling season?) is around the corner, so we want to refresh the graphics and perhaps adjust the items...

Tools, IDEs, etc.

Chris Muir documented Installing JDeveloper 11g v11.1.1.2.0 under Windows:

To save me time in the future, rather than having to write it again and again for clients, this blog entry documents how to install JDeveloper 11g Studio Edition v11.1.1.2.0 build 5536 under Windows. I'll admit it's not the most exciting blog post, for sure Oracle's already done it (without my witty dialogue of course), and hey, it's not even the latest release, but sometimes we just gotta-do-documentation-for-documentation's-sake...

Toni Epple investigated Extensible Node Hierarchies for Custom Project Types:

Since NetBeans 6.0 you can extend existing Project Types by registering a NodeFactory as described here: http://platform.netbeans.org/tutorials/60/nbm-projectextension.htmlThat’s cool, but what about your own project types, not only the ones predefined by NetBeans? So if for example you defined your own project type as described here...

Geertjan Wielenga discovered an Amazing Test Infrastructure for NetBeans RCP Apps:

Yesterday and today I worked through a lot of the FAQs, mailing lists, and other random documentation on the web in order to figure out a simple procedure for setting up unit tests, functional tests, and code coverage measurement for a NetBeans Platform application. Turns out, it was really easy, since all the related frameworks are part and parcel of the NetBeans Platform build harness. Simply go to the "harness" folder in your NetBeans IDE installation and you'll see what I'm talking about. Everything from extensions to Jemmy and JUnit for NetBeans Platform applications, to code coverage via Cobertura...

Geertjan also reported on Research in Metabolomics and Proteomics on the NetBeans Platform:

YANPA (yet another NetBeans Platform application) comes from Bielefeld University in Germany. There, Nils Hoffmann is a PhD student in the area of metabolomics. He's also the main author ofmaltcms.sourceforge.net, an application framework mostly geared towards the definition and execution of data processing and analysis pipelines for data from machinery such as gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometers. Nils writes...

John Ferguson Smart provided advice on Managing version numbers in Maven with the Maven Versions plugin:

If you have a Maven project of any size, particularly involving many modules or large numbers of dependencies, you have probably come across issues when updating your version numbers. Of course the Maven Release Plugin does a great job for updating version numbers as part of the automated release process, but there are times when it doesn't quite fit the bill, and version numbers are not limited...

JDK, JVM, JSRs

Stephen Colbourne asked for help with Java generics migration compatibility:

A quick call for help on generics. Joda-Time has the following non-generic interface, with an example dummy implementation...

Ed Burns announced a Decision: Drop support for JavaSE 5 in ongoing Oracle Mojarra 2.1 development efforts -

In order to bring the testing matrix for Mojarra more in line with Oracle

A majority of voters in this past week's java.net poll consider technical sessions the most valuable type of technical conference session. A total of 111 people voted in the poll, which asked What type of technical conference sessions are most valuable?Here are the full results:

  • 5% (5 votes) - Keynote addresses
  • 3% (3 votes) - Panel sessions
  • 59% (65 votes) - Technical sessions
  • 10% (11 votes) - BOF (birds of a feather) sessions
  • 3% (3 votes) - Other
  • 22% (24 votes) - I don't know

In an interesting comment, nopjn disagreed with the majority:

I answered this question with JavaOne in mind. That's why I answered "keynote" (I may be the only one), because, IMHO, technical sessions are useless for me. I prefer a good doc or written tutorial. And if those are missing, I shouldn't use the product/API in the first place. Furthermore, what I really want to learn in those conferences are the global company strategy, vision and road-map. Will I finally get my properties/binding in Java with my nice lambdas so that I can use my open source JavaFX effectively :) ?

New poll: Will you be attending JavaOne?

About six months ago, we ran a poll asking people Do you think you'll be attending JavaOne 2010? To get a more up-to-date view on this, this week's new poll asks Will you be attending JavaOne 2010? The poll will be open for the next week.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Java tools and IDEs were the leading news topic on java.net this past week, with conferences close behind.

If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the week's java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Conferences, JUG Meetings, Seminars

The current java.net poll asks What type of technical conference sessions are most valuable?Voting will be close on Monday.

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announced the upcoming GlassFish Party at JavaOne:

Are you a GlassFish Fan, Friend or Relative. Are you going to be in the Bay Area during JavaOne? If so, put our GlassFish Party in your calendar. Like in previous years, we will be hosting this at TheThirstyBear, the day before the events start in earnest. This year, that means Sunday evening.  Attendance is free but we request RSVP...

Toni Epple provided an overview of the NetBeans Platform talks at JavaOne

This year I had the honour of being one of the reviewers for JavaOne, and it was tough choosing from tons of good submissions. It

This week's new java.net poll asks What type of technical conference sessions are most valuable?Voting will be open for the next week.

Last week's poll was intended to assist java.net with future planning. The poll asked "Which of the following describes your java.net user account(s) and account-related email addresses?" A total of 281 votes were cast - thanks for voting! The final results were:

  • 67% (187 votes) - I only have one account at java.net
  • 4% (10 votes) - I have multiple accounts at java.net and each has a different email address
  • 3% (9 votes) - I have multiple accounts at java.net with the same email address, but I can change that
  • 2% (5 votes) - I absolutely need to have multiple accounts at java.net with the same email address
  • 17% (47 votes) - I don't have a java.net account
  • 7% (19 votes) - I don't know
  • 1% (4 votes) - Other

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Conferences remained the top news topic on java.net this past week. With JavaOne just coming up in six weeks, there is starting to be more and more to talk and write about. Other topics receiving considerable coverage included JavaEE / GlassFish and Java tools.

You'll notice a couple changes on the java.net home page. We are now featuring two Spotlight items at a time, and we've moved them to the top right column. Another change starting this coming week is the java.net poll: I'll be closing the old poll and opening the new poll on Monday. So, if you've got an idea for the next java.net poll, you still have the weekend to get it to me.

If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the week's java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Conferences, JUG Meetings, Seminars

The JavaOne Conference blog presented Java Rock Stars - Part 1 (of 3):

We've been giving lots of blog space to the bands playing at the Oracle Appreciation Event. Parties are great (see you there!), but we know the real reason you want to come to JavaOne: to learn and get deep technical info from the real celebrities: the Java Rock Stars! We've got over 30 Java Rock Stars returning for JavaOne 2010. These are the folks that love Java, really know their stuff, and give fantastic presentations. We'll do a three-part listing of returning Rock Stars (in alphabetical order), below is part one. This is the real reason to come to JavaOne! ...

The JavaOne Conference Blog also reminded us there is One Week left to Win FREE JavaOne Full Conference Pass:

Doesn't have to be pretty, doesn't have to be fancy, just tell the community why you should get a FREE full conference pass to JavaOne.  So far no one has taken the plunge...so be the first!!! Learn more or submit Today!* EXTRA Bonus (since Early Bird is officially over)- Everyone who submits a valid video entry will get a discount code for Early Bird pricing to use at time of registration for JavaOne and Oracle Develop. This is a savings of $400 or more over the onsite price! ...

Markus Eisele analyzed the JavaOne (and corollary conferences) schedule, and he's come up with a Java Enterprise Edition Schedule for @javaoneconf, @oracledevelop and @oracleopenworld:

Planning on my OOW/J1/OD trip is making progress. Blogger registration still not aproved and I am waiting for my flight confirmations, but I already found some time to browse through the Content Catalog and pick up some interesting sessions. At the moment I still have a comparable number of sessions in my interests as I have in my agenda. I did not check, if it is doable. You need to take into account that you have to move from one location to another. Switching from the Hilton to the Marriott in less than a minute probably will not work :) Therefore I have to adjust some slots on the following schedule. But it is, what I believe a very great Java Enterprise Edition Schedule...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart began planning a GlassFish Community Meeting During JavaOne:

We just got access to a room in Moscone West for a GlassFishhttp://wikis.sun.com/images/icons/linkext7.gifcommunity event in the spirit of the unconference we have done these last few years (2008http://wikis.sun.com/images/icons/linkext7.gif,2009http://wikis.sun.com/images/icons/linkext7.gif). The event would be the afternoon of the Sunday before J1, Sept 19th.  We are still working out how widely available can we make the event, but if you can certainly attend if have any pass for any of JavaOne, Oracle OpenWorld, or Oracle Develop..

Dustin Marx noted the increased JavaOne scheduling difficulty that's brought on by the Unconference at JavaOne 2010:

The Unconference concept has become very popular in recent years (Oracle offered its first OpenWorld Unconference at Oracle OpenWorld 2007).  The Unconferences for JavaOne 2010 and Oracle Develop 2010 are featured on this Wiki page.  There are numerous slots still available for anyone interested in organizing an Unconferencetopic, but several topics are already scheduled.  The Scheduled Sessions Descriptions page provides descriptions of a few of these. The Unconferencesessions are being held in conjunction with JavaOneand Oracle Develop.  They will be held 20-23 September 2010...

Adam Bien pointed us to JUGs, Un-Workshops, No-Slides Sessions, Interactive Hackings... with Java EE 6 (the Lightweigt Stuff):

* JUG Darmstadt: Stop Talking, Start Hacking "Session" in Darmstadt (24.08.2010); * Java EE 6 Patterns, or one week Real World Java EE 6 in Hamburg (30.08-03.09.2010) - some places left - will take place; * I promised a talk at the JUG HHin between 30.0http://blogs.sun.com/darcy/entry/jvmlang_numbers8.-02.09.2010 - but the JUG guys seems to be on vacations. If you have another ideas for a JUG freestyle session in Hamburg in this period - let me know. In worst case we could occupy StarBucks :-) ...

Our second java.net Spotlight this past week was the JavaOne Conference Blog's Java Rock Stars - Part 2 (of 3):

We've got over 30 Java Rock Stars returning for JavaOne 2010. These are the folks that love Java, really know their stuff, and give fantastic presentations. Here's the second third of our listing. To get the most out of JavaONE, make sure you attend some of these sessions. There's so much to learn from these rock stars!

Sonya Barry posted The better late than never OSCON blog:

I've been writing this one in my head for two weeks now. I went to Portland for the Community Leadership Summit (CLS) and OSCON and then have been too busy playing catch up to write about it. I had an amazing time at both events and definitely came away with more new information swimming in my head than from any other conferences I've been to combined.

JavaEE, GlassFish

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announced GlassFish 3.1 Milestone 3 - Admin console can now speak cluster!

The GlassFish admin console is often cited as one of the strong point for GlassFish. Yes, open source and ease-of-us can live happily together! After delivering clustering and centralized admin features in Milestones 1 (post) and 2 (post) of the ongoing 3.1 work, it was time in Milestone 3 to deliver the first drop of a graphical user interface that is able to interact with these features. The following is a short screencast...

Adam Bien showed Why Stateful and Local Anti-Facades Are KISS:

The Gateway exposes rich and persistent domain objects directly to the presentation logic. Because the domain objects are well encapsulated already - it is rather an advantage, than a shortcoming. Because of simplicity and built-in aspects, an EJB 3.1 happens to be the simplest and leanest candidate for a Gateway implementation. Why local (to JSF 2, Wicket or a Fat Client)? ...

On JavaLobby, Andy Gibson showed How to do 10 Common Tasks in JSF 2.0:

Here

In the Java-related blogs I subscribe to, there are four recent entries talking about interesting new videos and books related to Java EE, GlassFish, and NetBeans. First, the books:

Frank Kieviet received and reviewed Masoud Kalali's new book GlassFish Security:

Pact Publishing was kind enough to send me a copy of the book "GlassFish Security" that was released very recently. It's tough to find the time to read a book cover to cover. In fact, it's been a while since I've read a book from beginning to end. Typically I'm only interested in a few chapters which I then read. Later, when the need arises, I may get back to other chapter. It's like treating a book like an encyclopedia or a dictionary. I bet that most people read technical books that way nowadays. So it's important that a book lends itself to be read that way...

Geertjan Wielenga talked about The Next NetBeans Platform Book... And the Next Next NetBeans Platform Book!

It's official. I am no longer allowed to torture Packt with further tweaks and edits. J

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