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https://www.packtpub.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/productview/9386_MockupCover.jpg Masoud Kalali is giving away three copies of his new book, GlassFish Security (published by Packt Publishing). To be among the winners, you have to successfully complete a five question quiz that's based on the content of Chapter 3 of the book, "Designing and Developing Secure Java EE Applications."

Masoud says he'll

"give away some copies of the book to3 lucky winners who answered all 5 questions correctly. We will give away 1 paper copy to someone in USA or Europe and two e-books to any lucky winner either in those two continent or not. It wont take more than 2-3 minutes to answer the questions and you will get the chance to receive a copy of the book when I draw the winners on October 10th."

So, you've got less than two weeks to download Chapter 3, understand it, and take the quiz.

A final note: Masoud discovered that his quiz software has some problems with Firefox; he advises that you "please go with Google Chrome or Apple Safari."


Java Today

Terrence Barr announces LWUIT Webinar now available in archive:

Just wanted to let you know that the LWUIT webinar I did two weeks ago is now available in the archive for viewing...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine presents javaOne 2010 : Java EE 6 Panel "What do we do now?" notes -

I was privileged to be moderating this year's Java EE panel at JavaOne (session 313278). We had a great list of panelists and a lively discussion. Here are my notes: Panelists...

Markus Eisele is Reviewing JavaONE, Oracle OpenWorld and Oracle Develop:

A few days after being back in Germany I finally found the time to do a review about this years mega Oracle and Java event which happened from September 19-23 in San Francisco. As always, I already found a couple of things, that did not work for me. But in general it was simply awesome. First of all, there are the plain numbers, that are impressive...

Slim Ouertani posted Auditing JEE 6 Ear application:

Programming is easier when you did hello world application and use a common best practice patterns. Yesterday, I audited an JEE 6 wab application that has became too slowly day after day. Application is "very trivial" at first view : 1. Persistence using oracle 10g data base. 2. Data access with JPA 2 entities and eclipselink provider. 3. Controller with stateless EJB 3.1 and no interface design. 4. The famous Wicket framework view layer. All the application is an ear deployed inside glassfish V3 container using JTA and data source facilities...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Is JavaOne still the most important Java-centric conference?Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Due primarily to JavaOne, the last java.net poll, which asked "What's your view of Java on the desktop?" ran for 11 days instead of the standard one week period. I was quite busy during JavaOne, and people were continuing to vote and post comments to the poll, so I let it stay open.

The poll drew 578 votes, much more than most recent polls. And 7 interesting comments were posted. The final results were:

What's your view of Java on the desktop?

  • 15% (88 votes) - It's still alive and vibrant
  • 39% (224 votes) - It's suffering due to Sun/Oracle's mismanagement
  • 11% (65 votes) - It's down, but will rise again
  • 8% (44 votes) - It's become irrelevant due to smartphones, iPad, etc.
  • 16% (95 votes) - Java on the desktop is dead
  • 1% (8 votes) - Other
  • 9% (54 votes) - I don't know

New poll: JavaOne?

Our new poll asks Is JavaOne still the most important Java-centric conference?Voting will be open until a week from Monday (so we can get back onto our normal schedule of having a new poll every Monday).

Java Today

Adam Bien presents JavaOne 10 Afterglow - a List of Thoughts, Surprises and Back to Moscone:

1. At Sunday there was a NDA-Event :-) with Oracle product managers and engineers regarding strategy and positioning. You had the chance (after signing a auto-expiring NDA) to chat with product managers and engineeers. We got some insights why certain things are as they are. It turned out - it takes some time before the culture of both companies merges. 2. The conference started with well attended Glassfish Community Event...

On JavaLobby, Ian Skerrett writes about The New JavaOne; The New Java Community:

The first JavaOne, organized by Oracle is now finished. This was definitely a JavaOne very different from those of the past. In fact, I think it is symbolic of how Oracle will operate the Java community moving forward. Some observations from the new JavaOne...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine comments on the JavaOne 2010 Technical Keynotes:

I don't really attend keynotes to learn something new (it's pretty much my job to know this stuff before). Rather, I try to sense how people react by following tweeter tags and by being in the room. This year's JavaOne Technical Keynote with Mark Reinhold, Roberto Chinnici, and Greg Bollella was no exception...

Dustin Marx summarizes the JavaOne 2010: Concurrency Grab Bag session:

The final session that I attended at JavaOne 2010 was the presentation "Concurrency Grab Bag: : More Gotchas, Tips, and Patterns for Practical Concurrency" by Sangjin Lee and Debashis Saha (not here today) of eBay. Despite what my schedule stated on Schedule Builder, this second instance of this session was held in Parc 55's Marketstreet rather than in Cyril Magnin II...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Is JavaOne still the most important Java-centric conference?Voting will be open until a week from Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Larry Ellison presented Oracle's vision of hardware and software fusion this afternoon, talking about servers, Solaris, Linux, Java, MySQL, and much more. Ellison said Oracle's research and development budget will exceed $4 Billion, "and why stop there?" The objective is to deliver complete, integrated systems, utilizing the host of components that are now are growing under the Oracle umbrella.

Larry highlighted the recent additions to Oracle's management, saying Oracle has never had such an experienced management team.

Larry returned to one of his pet peeves: the cloud. He cited comments from SalesForce.com saying he doesn't understand "the cloud" because he (Larry) thinks everything runs on a box. Larry is quite common-sensical on this, in my view. A data center is a bunch of "boxes" -- I work in one. Believe me, calling it a "cloud" doesn't help us accomplish our 9's of uptime objective.

A big part of Larry's discussion was about the size of the boxes. Do you use thousands of small boxes (PCs), or might it be better to have just a few enormously powerful boxes (like the Exalogic Elastic Cloud box, which has 360 processing cores, and 30 separate servers all in one box). The Exalogic provides the fastest Java performance today. "Elastic" means that if you need more processing power, you just launch new JVMs -- rather than having to deploy new hardware.

The Exalogic can handle 1 Million HTTP requests per second, and 2 Million messages per second. Yet, according to Larry, the Exalogic requires only 20% of the hardware and software footprint compared with a standard small-box cloud. And, the Exalogic provides full fault tolerance -- there are no single points of failure.

Larry's next point is that all Exalogic machines are identical, which means there is a standard configuration that includes both hardware and software. This is the typical data center problem: your configuration is unique. Instead, with the Exalogic, Oracle provides the hardware and software as a unit, fully tested. You then run your apps on that base hardware / OS / JVM platform. A pretty nice idea, in my opinion.

I guess the Exalogic machines "phone home" -- patches will be automatically delivered to the entire network of Exalogic machines. Scary? I don't know if the patches will automatically be installed, but it sounds like you'll automatically be notified that a patch is available. But if the patches weren't automatically installed, then Oracle would quickly lose the advantage of everyone having the same configuration. So, it will be interesting to see what the licensing agreement will be, and what mechanism will be applied for delivering and installing patches.

50 Terabytes of data can be stored in Flash memory, meaning data access is very fast compared with disk-only data storage.

Oracle Linux will be 100% compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux -- but Oracle will fix bugs faster than Red Hat, Larry says. Beyond this, Oracle will be developing its own "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" -- which will provide extreme performance, extreme reliability, extreme security, and is also optimized for Oracle hardware and applications.

The next topic was business intelligence, CRM systems, ERP systems, etc. Then new user interfaces for those types of apps. Content of greater interest to business analysts than developers, I think... An interesting point was that Oracle's Fusion applications are available either for installation in your own data center, or from Oracle's cloud -- with exactly the same application, the same code base. Larry says this is unique.

From here on, the presentation became very Oracle-product-centric -- interesting from a business point of view, but kind of outside of java.net's focus.

In the End

In the end, my thoughts go back to Larry's discussion of "the cloud." I think Larry Ellison is a quite pragmatic guy, a nuts and bolts guy, at his core. Why doesn't he like the term "the cloud"? Because he considers the term and image "the cloud" to be a mask that covers over the incredible difficulty that providing high availability and reliability and fault-tolerance entails. In a "la-di-da" world, yeah, "my app is running in the cloud, I have no worries" -- a tiny start-up company might think this, before they suddenly have an enormous surge of hits to their site.

Larry knows that without rock-solid fault-tolerance, that idea of what "the cloud" is, is an illusion. So, Larry says: "Ladies and Gentlemen, do you want rhapsodic visions, or something that works?"

I'm with Larry on this one. Give me hardware and software integration that works with complete fault-tolerance. I don't need a mask named "the cloud" to make me feel comfortable. In fact, if it's called "the cloud" I may worry that the vendor doesn't understand how difficult it is to actually deliver highly reliable availability. I might even think they're wearing rose-colored glasses that have a cloud imprinted on the lens!


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

If you haven't been able to catch all the Oracle Technology Network Live streamed events that you've wanted to see, you can find archives of the live streams at the Oracle Media Network page. Click on the "Newest" tab, and as you scroll to the subsequent pages you'll find keynotes; Kohsuke Kawaguchi's talk with Tori Wieldt; java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry's conversation with Java Tools leader Fabiane Nardon and JUG leader Bruno Souza; Arun Gupta's talk with Tori about Java EE 6 and GlassFish; and lots more. Check it out!


Java Today

Markus Eisele presents an overview of his JavaOne Oracle DevelopDay 6: Working and Working -

Sleept longer today. Seems as if I get adjusted to the new timezone. Right in time for the flight back, which is'nt that far away. Great. Anyway. Yesterday was a mess. I had to work on some customer things in the morning and the real conference started around noon for me. I walked around The Zone and stopped by the OTN live broadcasting. Just in time to meet Ed Burns. He is the SpecLead for JSF. It's not only fun to here him talking about 2.x and what they are going to do. It's also fun to walk around with him...

Dalibor Topic presents Next Entry OpenJDK In Some More News: JDK Roadmap for Advancing Java SE -

Quoting from another Oracle press release: * Oracle is announcing its plans for advancing the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) and optimizing it for new application models and hardware, including extended support for scripting languages, increased developer productivity and lower operational costs. * The announced roadmap for the OpenJDK accelerates the availability of Java SE with two releases, one in 2011 and one in 2012. These OpenJDK releases will continue to serve as the basis for the Oracle Java Development Kit (JDK) 7 and JDK 8. * The decisions regarding the features to be included in the JDK 7 and JDK 8 releases were made with active participation of the Java community...

Dustin Marx provides session notes in JavaOne 2010: Speedy Scripting: Productivity and Performance-

Per Bothnerpresented "Speedy Scripting: Productivity and Performance" today atJavaOne 2010. He started into this topic by presenting things we like about scripting languages and things we like about compiled languages. For example, he talked about how we generally like the no or hidden compiling of scripting languages as well as scripting languages' less boilerplate and runtime advancements. Desirable features of compiled languages include execution speed, compile time error checking, greater ability for tooling to help, and greater ability for humans to read and understand what's happening specifically...

Arun Gupta posted S313522: Instructions for OSGi-enabled Java EE Applications Hands-on Lab at JavaOne 2010 -

This blog provides instructions on how to follow S313522(Hands-on Lab on OSGi-enabled Java EE Applications) that was conducted at JavaOne 2010 earlier today. * Download and Install NetBeans 6.9.1. * Download and Unzip GlassFish 3.1 b20 Web Profile. * Start GlassFish as "asadmin start-domain" and Database as "asadmin start-database" from "glassfishv3/glassfish/bin" directory...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of Java on the desktop? Voting will end soon.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

It seems like, overall, the reception for this year's JavaOne among attendees is quite positive and enthusiastic. I thought the new design, which separates more "corporate" type presentations from the purely developer-centric content would produce a more interesting and exciting JavaOne conference for developers. This indeed seems to be happening.

As java.net editor, my problem is that there is simply too much interesting news for me to put it all on the java.net front page. So, in this blog, I'll point you to a bunch of interesting stuff that has been written by JavaOne 2010 attendees who don't blog on java.net.

Here's a small subset of interesting JavaOne 2010 related posts (in no particular order):

  • Joseph Darcy: Project Coin at JavaOne 2010 - This morning and early afternoon Maurizio and I gave our JavaOne talk about Project Coin to a packed room; the slides for the talk are now available. The NetBeans demo of Coin support also went smoothly...
  • Markus Eisele: Day 5: Let's get the conference started - Being here for already five days, this was the first real conference day. And, to be honest, I am dead beaten after the last few days. So there were some sessions to attend, but the most obvious thing, we all were waiting for, was the JavaOne Keynote this evening...
  • Justin Kestelyn: Java Directions Keynote + OTN Night - Thomas Kurian has delivered his "Java Strategy & Directions" keynote, which I cannot summarize any better than Oracle ACE Director Lucas Jellema. Dustin Marx also has nice coverage here. We'll bring you keynote highlights on video when when have them. Didja miss OTN Night, with Apolo Anton Ohno in the house?
  • Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine: JavaOne 2010, 36 hours into it - This JavaOne started off with the GlassFish community event on Sunday (read more on TheAquarium). By all metrics I think this was a very successful event and certainly on the "I finally got to meet XYZ in person" metric (my favorite) it was the best one so far for me. The party after Larry's keynote (a little long and not what I had expected) was great too and it felt good to be back in a familiar place.
  • Terrence Barr: News Flash: JavaOne Keynote

So, what will the Monday night Oracle Open World / JavaOne / Oracle Develop keynote tell us? Intel and Thomas Kurian will provide the answer, which I'm watching on the Oracle Technology Network Live videostream.

So, I work in an Oracle/Sun data center. I guess you could say I'm biased, because we made that decision and it has turned out great for us. But, we are building a new data center, a next-generation data center. So, I'm really interested in what the future holds.

Intel is about to speak. I loved my tenure as community manager for ThreadingBuildingBlocks.org. Intel is superb! They understand the interactions between hardware and software. Bottlenecks are ultimately hardware related (the hardware executes as many instructions as it can in a given period of time); yet, ineffiecient software can leave too much hardware sitting around doing nothing; or, it can ask the hardware to repeat solutions to problems that have already been solved, but which weren't saved.

Intel designs its hardware such that it will deliver ultimate performance for software developers who have some understanding of the implications that a line of code has on hardware.

Now the conversation turns to Java, the collaboration between Intel and Oracle with respect to Java, with an invitation to visit Intel Booth 509 at JavaOne. And the Intel presentation ends.

The focus now turns to Java, with Oracle's Thomas Kurian speaking. Thomas highlighted Project Coin, with its improved type reference inference, try-with-resource blocks; Project Lambda (closures); and Project Jigsaw (the modular Java platform).

The next focus is multi-core processors, large memories, fast networks. You know that I belive this is the future, and must be addressed. Also, support for additional languages (Scala, for example) will be added. This is the .NET model (and I won't argue who invented it first, Sun or Microsoft - though, to me, .NET was a response to Java)...

There will be new OpenJDK releases in 2011 and 2012.

The next discussion is on the client side. HTML5 is a key focus, along with native applications. JavaFX, JavaScript, Java 2D and 3D are considered key. JavaFX is highlighted as being a key element in the Java client arena going forward. Open Source is highlighted, along with support for large datasets, and flexibility with respect to images and other data types.

Oracle's view is that all future browsers will run HTML5. Which means that Java and Javascript and modern graphic engines will be deployable to provide new Web experiences (as well as desktop experiences, I'd think).

I like what I'm hearing, so far!

Next is a demo of what Java is able to accomplish today on the client side. A JavaFX cup, followed by a game screen... an array of screens... fancy graphics/visualizations... quite fancy. All done vector graphics, no images. I think you have to see it to comprehend it. A real lot is possible using vector graphics and Java.

Thomas talked about the mobile vision: Project Mobile.Next. This will involve updates to the Java language, the VM, libraries, packages, and APIs. The goal is to enable Java support for new devices and new markets, including smartphones and many other mobile devices. Java Card and mobile payments were featured.

Bioware was the next focus, in a presentation of the "StarWars: The Old Republic" game, which runs on GlassFish. The video was spectacular, and it seems it's all developed using Java.

In conclusion, Thomas said Oracle is committed to giving developers the world's best programming platform on the desktop side, on the mobile side, and on the server side. And he announced the upcoming non-US JavaOnes. Then Olympic Champion Apollo Ohno came out, and said he was excited to be at JavaOne. I really liked watching him at recent Olympics, and it's a thrill to see him at JavaOne! He said often people tell him "You look a lot like Apollo Ohno" and he says "I hear that a lot!"

So, what will the Monday night Oracle Open World / JavaOne / Oracle Develop keynote tell us? Intel and Thomas Kurian will provide the answer, which I'm watching on the Oracle Technology Network Live videostream "The future of Java is not about Oracle, it's about you the developers, and what you make Java become" -- or something like that was Thomas's last statement.

I myself am pleased by Oracle's vision for Java, as presented at JavaOne 2010 thus far. What do you think?


Java Today

Justin Kestelyn points us to the JavaOne photostream in Let The Photos Commence:

Yep, we're onsite in our JavaOne home for the week, the Mason St. tent, and documentation of the goings-on around us has already begun... Stay tuned to this photostream for more virtual experiences!

On the JavaOne Conference Blog, Janice Heiss posted Rock Stars Tony Printezis and Raghavan Srinivas Chime in on the Future of Java:

I caught up with two JavaOne Rock Stars, Tony Printezis of Oracle and Raghavan Srinivas, a Java evangelist known for keeping his finger to the wind, to get their take on Java and JavaOne. I asked Printezis, a leading expert on Garbage Collection and Java about this year's JavaOne...

R. Tyler Ballance of Hudson Labs, who's blogging at JavaOne, reported on the Pre-JavaOne Hudson Meetup Redux:

Yesterday Digg was kind enough to host and "sponsor" (read: free drinks and pizza!) a Hudson meetup at their offices in San Francisco. While Digg has been the source of some controversy and press due to their recent redesign and corporate shake-ups, as far as the Hudson community goes they've been largely responsible for a great case study on continuous deployment using Hudson and Gerrit...

Dustin Marx is posting JavaOne 2010: JDK 7 and Java SE 7 as he attends the JavaOne 2010: JDK 7 and Java SE 7 session at JavaOne:

For my first real JavaOne 2010 session, I am attending JavaOne 2010: JDK 7 and Java SE 7 in the large Hilton San Francisco Grand Ballroom A/B.  I normally write a blog post in its entirety before submitting it, but in this case I am going to continually submit this same post with updates as the presentation continues.  In other words, I will be updating this same post throughout the presentation...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of Java on the desktop? Voting will be end soon.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry interviewed JUG leader Bruno Souza and Java Tools Community leader Fabiane Nardon this afternoon. Both Bruno and Fabiane are from Brazil. I watched on the OTN Live videostream.

Bruno started out, saying JUGs are going strong. He and Sonya pointed out the new java.net infrastructure improvements, and and Bruno talked about the value of java.net as a central gathering place for JUGs.

Fabiane said the Java Tools Community includes more than 800 projects. She too looks forward to the new improvements in the java.net infrastructure, believing the changes will benefit both the java.net communities and project owners. Fabiane tried to define what a "Java Tool" actually is, but found that the term covers a very wide spectrum of possibilities, since so many types of software can support software development.

Fabiane and Bruno talked about a new venture where tools will be hosted in the cloud, rather than companies purchasing or supporting their own local copies of the software. The advantage would be that even small companies will be able to access and utilize the best development tools. Part of their venture is to provide advice and training regarding software engineering.

Sonya noted that a new objective for java.net will be to simplify the paths through which new developers can become involved in existing projects and communities, start new projects, etc. Fabiane said it's very hard to find volunteers, and the conversation continued on the topic of involving people in contributing to open source projects. Fabiane also stressed the need for communities and projects to have new people coming in to participate; without new people, the projects can become stale, and the excitement can be lost. Sonya pointed out the importance of diversity in keeping projects lively and interesting.

The conversation ended with additional discussion of Java User Groups


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The Oracle Technology Network Live streamed Tori Weldt's interview with Kohsuke Kawaguchi about Hudson. Kohsuke had just given his JavaOne session Getting More Out of Your Hudson, in which he covered some of the most useful Hudson extensions.

Kohsuke talked about the Join extension and Selenium support. Looking to the future, he said extended localization support is needed for Hudson, in particular Asian languages.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

A brief review of Monday morning's JavaOne keynote, which I watched on the Oracle Technology Network Live videostream. It was a two-part keynote, with Fujitsu leading off and John Fowler following.

Fujitsu's presentation opened with a video production that talked about the craftsmanship and attention to detail that is an important aspect of Japan's history--basically a Fujitsu commercial that says Fujitsu continues this tradition, "shaping tomorrow with you."

Fujitsu considers us to be moving from a network-centric era into a human-centric era, where data and technology are applied for the benefit of individuals (for example, GPS navigation, entertainment, health).

The next video covered Fujitsu's history. I didn't know that the original SPARC processor was developed by Fujitsu, and that Fujitsu and Sun had a close relationship with respect to the development of Sun hardware and Solaris.

John Fowler came on to talk about Fujitsu's partnership with Oracle (and Sun) to end the Fujitsu keynote, then proceeded to talk on his own about Oracle's hardware and software objectives and new products, including new servers and a Solaris 11 preview.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Well, the first big JavaOne 2010 surprise for me has already happened. I'm following Oracle Technology Network leader Justin Kestelyn on Twitter tonight, as he reports on Larry Ellison's JavaOne opening keynote. Looks like Oracle is going to become a major player in Linux, on the enterprise side (who'd have guessed?).

Justin says Oracle will offer two new Linux distributions: 1) a RedHat Enterprise Linux compatible version; 2) a new "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" (UEK) Linux. In other words, Oracle intends to develop a super-reliable server-side Linux. Justin notes that the UEK Linux will be optimized for use with Oracle products.

Yes, Oracle wants to take over the server side of the world. If they provide new options that are highly reliable, should we complain?

I attended last year's JavaOne. I'm not there in person this year. But, last year I liked what Larry said. With the news that Oracle will produce a new, extremely enterprise-solid Linux distribution, I'm still liking what Larry says.


Java Today

On the JavaOne Conference Blog, Janice Heiss says HelloWorld from San Francisco Sunday Sept. 19, 2010:

This will be my 11th JavaOne. I can remember sitting down with Kim Polese, who I believe is still CEO of SpikeSource, but was then a Sun Product Manager in charge of publicizing this new software called "Java," sometime around 1997 and listening to her describe the history of Java, which was initially planned for use with set-top boxes, but had been adapted for use on this new thing, the Internet, because of its amazing interoperability. My head was spinning as she spoke (and has never stopped spinning). Scott McNealy had given some of Sun's most gifted minds the freedom to experiment and play, to read the tea leaves and interpret the prevailing winds and see where technology should or might be headed. James Gosling, Bill Joy and company let their imaginations loose for a year or so until McNealy told them it was time for Project Oak, as it was then called, to come to fruition...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart provides JavaOne Minus One - The Guides to the Conferences:

JavaOne starts on Monday, but several key events are tomorrow, Sunday, including the keynote for OOW and the GlassFish Community Event and Party :-). This will be a very busy week; below is a list of guides to (some) of the main events...

Hudson Labs notes JavaOne taking shape:

Last night on my way out of San Francisco I stopped by 4th and Howard St to get my first taste of JavaOne/Oracle OpenWorld which was already taking shape at the location. Besides snapping the photo below, I also managed to get yelled out by an old woman wearing a red "security" jacket; suffice to say my JavaOne experience is already everything I expected! ...

David Thielen announces his JavaOne and the future of Java effort:

I'll be blogging all next week from JavaOne(including hopefully an interview with Larry Ellison). And the number one question I think all of us have is - what's the future of Java? There are a ton of conference sessions and that's a really good sign. While the JavaOne keynote is the day after the Oracle World keynote, it does include Larry Ellison (good sign). Oracle talks about keeping Java open (good sign), and then immediately sues Google over their use of it (bad sign)...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of Java on the desktop? Voting will be end soon.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

So you're going to JavaOne! What are you going to do there? Well, it all depends on what you're interested in, right? Lots of people have been posting their suggestions. Below, in no particular order, is a selection of recent suggestions on what to do at this year's JavaOne.

  • Shai Almog: LWUIT At JavaOne 2010 - If you are going to JavaOne this year there are quite a few LWUIT related sessions/BoF's you should probably add to your schedule. The first is Chen and my traditional JavaOne session, unfortunately I won't be able to attend this year due to family issues and Ariel Levin will replace me in this session (for those who don't know Ariel, he has a long and glorious history with Java ME and is a pretty entertaining/knowledgeable speaker)...

  • Terrence Barr: Session recommendations for JavaOne - I blogged about the high-level agenda items a couple of days ago as well as my own sessions. But there are lots of interesting sessions and labs that might be easily overlooked so today I’d like to share my recommended list – basically, things that interest me from a core platform/language/mobile/embedded perspective. Guaranteed to be totally subjective ;-) . So, here we go...

  • Dustin Marx: JavaOne 2010 Abstract of the Day #11: A Brief Introduction to Scala - Scala has received significant positive press in recent years.  The main Scala page describes Scala as "a concise, elegant, type-safe programming language that integrates object-oriented and functional features" that is "fully interoperable with Java."  As this description states, Scala supports object-oriented concepts and functional programming concepts.  A couple years ago, I spent a few hoursreading about Scala and found it interesting, but I've never really taken the opportunity to really use it...

  • JCP Program Office: JavaOne is approaching! - The approach of JavaOne (next week!) tends to galvanize activity within the JCP program. It's a perfect time to publish drafts of specifications and to meet face to face with Expert Groups, fellow Spec Leads, and members of the Executive Committee at the annual JCP program community event. Read more and RSVP to JCP events at JavaOne...

  • Justin Kestelyn: Java Posse BOF (Tues. Sept 21 @ 6pm) - As part of the myriad Oracle Technology Network activities at JavaOne, we are very happy to be hosting the Java PosseBOF on Tuesday evening @ 6pm in the Mason St. tent. No pre-registration is offered for this BOF, you have to show up on a first-come/first-serve basis. But if you can't make the BOF in person, you can watch it unfold via our live videostream...

  • Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart: GlassFish or WebLogic? - We just had a very successful pre-JavaOne briefing for the Java Champions, JUG Leaders and ACE Directors and several questions during the JavaEE segment related to the positioning of GlassFish and WebLogic. The basic story has not changed since our March roadmap but we now have some extra details, and repetition gets the message through so...

  • JavaOne Conference Blog: Keynotes Set the Tone - Don't forget that your JavaOne badge gets you into the keynotes. The Sunday night keynote features Larry Ellison, and he'll preview the week's announcements. Don't miss it. Sunday night, 5:30pm, at Moscone Center...

It turns out that I will not be attending JavaOne this year, due to a family situation. However, I will be following the conference blogs, tweets, and live videostream; and I'll be writing blogs, and doing a bit oftweeting myself. My next blog post, in fact, will be about how to follow JavaOne virtually. Just because we can't attend doesn't mean we can't participate!


Java Today

The JavaOne / Oracle Develop site highlights the contributions of 16 outstanding developers who are attending this year's JavaOne in "I Am the Future of Java":

Outstanding developers who are passionate about Java technology and the Java community share their insights about the future of Java and why they're excited about attending JavaOne 2010. We recognize and appreciate their commitment to the language and their many valuable contributions to the industry...

Markus Eisele discusses how We all are the future of Java! :):

You have probably already seen the great Java One page, refering to the outstanding developers who are passionate about Java technology and the Java community. They share their insights about the future of Java and why they're excited about attending JavaOne 2010. To be honest: I don't know all of them. In fact, I only know two :) But those two guys are outstanding. And I am not going to compare myself to them in any way. But I believe that the future of Java is not only about "outstanding developers" but about the whole community. Starting with the "new to Java" ones and the ones simply using the technology day after day...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine is getting ready, since there's Another JavaOne around the corner:

It's that time of the year again when the JavaOne excitement builds up with sleepless nights getting ready for the sessions, demos, etc... I am yet again looking forward to another very fine JavaOne conference. To be fair I wasn't all that excited say a couple of months ago because of the changes made to the conference (different venue with Develop and Oracle Open World happening at the same time) and the anticipated lack of announcements but I can now say that the team has done a lot of work to make the venue a comfortable place (with the Zone, a huge tent on Mason street) and that content-wise, I expect a good number of things to cause long, possibly heated, discussions. This will only demonstrate how vibrant the Java community remains...

Adam Bien is working on How to Deal with Interfaces in Java EE 6 (or no More IMPL):

In EJB 3.0 interfaces were required. So whether you liked it or not, you had to provide one. To make it look a bit natural, you could remove the "Remote" or "Local" suffix. This naming convention was redundant, because the interface had to be directly or indirectly annotated with @Local or @Remote annotation...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of Java on the desktop? Voting will be open until the start of JavaOne.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

This past week's poll on whether this year's JavaOne will have an increased "corporate" feel didn't produce a clear result. A 37% plurality thought this year's JavaOne will indeed have a greater corporate feel, but 33% selected "I don't know." The exact question and results were:

  • 37% (46 votes) - Greater - Oracle is a bigger corporation
  • 6% (8 votes) - About the same
  • 21% (26 votes) - Lesser - all the corporate stuff will be isolated into Oracle OpenWorld
  • 3% (4 votes) - Other
  • 33% (42 votes) - I don't know

New poll: Java on the Desktop

Our new poll is related to the question asked by cowwoc and re-asked by me regarding Java on the desktop. The poll asks: What's your view of Java on the desktop? Voting will be open for about the next week.

Java Today

Joseph Darcy talks about Project Coin: JDBC 4.1 and try-with-resources -

I'm happy to report that Lance Andersen and the JDBC expert group have decided to support the newtry-with-resources statement in JDBC 4.1. Lance justpushed a change set for JDBC 4.1 that retrofits theAutoCloseable interface to the types: *java.sql.Connection; *java.sql.ResultSet; * java.sql.Statement ...

Dalibor Topic presents OpenJDK News (2010-09-10):

JDK 7 build 109 is available. Build 109 bumps the HotSpot 19 build number up to 07 and contains changes to the G1 garbage collector, fixes for Zero and Shark HotSpot backends, addresses various issues in the pack200 implementation and contains a set of improvements across the class library. You can check out the list of changesfor details, and get the source code...

Vince Kraemer is investigating Web Service Nodes of a GlassFish Server 3.1 instance

NetBeans has supported web service development for quite a while but... I always hit an issue when I develop web services clients that bothered me... I never knew the wsdl url for services that I had deployed. So, if I was creating a client for a web service, I would need to have the service's implementation project available OR I would need to fire up the admin gui to find out what the wsdl url is to complete either of these two dialogs...

Geertjan Wielenga tells how to get Yahoo News on the Command Line with NetBeans:

One of my current favorite features in the IDE is the Web Service Registry... You can register web services there yourself and/or use the defaults provided by the IDE. Expand a node and you will end up with the specific method on the web service you'd like to invoke. Then you can drag that node into the Java editor. When you do so, all the background files are created (e.g., even including the file that will hold a registration key, if any, such as required by Yahoo, for example). Plus, you get a chunk of code in your Java class for invoking and processing the method on the web service...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Compared with past JavaOnes, will this year's JavaOne have a greater or lesser "corporate" feel? Voting will be open until next Monday.


Spotlights

Our new java.net Spotlight is Mark Reinhold's post, Re-thinking JDK 7:

It

On August 28, I featured on the front page of java.net a forum post, asked by java.net user cowwoc and titled Is Java (on the desktop) dead? In this forum post,cowwoc noted:

There was a time when java.net contained lots of exciting Desktop Java articles. Now all I ever see arOr is the desktop itself dying (except for programmers)?ound server-side enterprisy stuff. The same goes for javalobby.org and Oracle's direction with Java in general.

I've had previous online interactions with cowwocand I respect his/her views. So, to hear that java.net no longer contains "lots of exciting Desktop Java articles" attracts both my attention and concern. Despite the fact that java.net no longer publishes Desktop Java articles in part because we no longer publish any articles at all (due to the economy) I am very sensitive to cowwoc's commentary.

People who read my blogs know that I myself live today as a developer on the server-side. But, I don't think that'scowwoc's point. I mean, of what use is server-side technology without the client side? The client side is the customer of the server side. Without an appropriate interface for utilizing what the server side can provide, the server is useless.

The server side needs to serve a wide realm of clients. Just because the server runs Java doesn't mean it will only serve Java-based client apps. Likewise, Java-based client apps are designed to interface with multiple types of servers. Back in the early 2000s I worked on a project where we were developing a single Java-based client that was the interface to either a Unix-based or a Windows-based server back-end.

A lot has happened in the past few years. In one sense, it's easy to think, "Well, Java has proven itself on the server side, and all the current action is in the mobile arena, so who cares about the desktop?" Is that where we are? I don't know. I myself think not; but then I've been around quite a long time, I like my big screen and a client app that lets me do lots of nice things on that big screen.

Still, I wonder if an important question is: for the general public, is the desktop itself dying? Is the iPad a desktop? Or is it just a larger iPhone? A couple years ago Tim O'Reilly commented that he felt almost behind the times carrying a laptop computer at conferences. So, is the desktop itself disappearing, except for programmers, who need a big screen in order to see source code with large enough letters and appropriate indentations such that the code is readable? And what do 15-year-olds care about the desktop? But aren't they the future?

I think cowwoc has asked an important question. Is Java (on the desktop) dead? has certainly received a lot of interesting responses. Please consider continuing the discussion on the forum; or if you think my question "Is the desktop itself dying?" is worthy of discussion, consider posting a comment here. Having embraced Java on the client side way back in 1998 at the Data Center where I still work, I'm very interested in hearing what developers think about these questions today.

Java Today

Markus Eisele notes that it's the simple things that typically make everything complicated in Hyphen usage in package names:

As always, the simple things in live make everything complicated. A co-worker came up with this and I would like to answer the question and point you to some additional links. Do we have a prefered way about our Java package names? Do we use the short...

Hudson Labs reports that HudsonMobi dons a black turtleneck and jumps to iOS4:

Last time I talked about HudsonMobi 2.0 there were some hiccups with the QR code which made me pretty irritated. Now the leading mobile app for Hudson users has regained my trust with their lastest release for iOS 4, the latest incarnation of Apple's mobile operating systems for iPhones and iPod Touches...

Geertjan Wielenga discovered Search for UNHCR on the NetBeans Platform:

It turns out that not just UNESCO, but also the UNHCR is working with the NetBeans Platform. I've known this for a while, because I've been in touch with Stanyslas Tamayo from the UNHCR , who's been asking questions off and on for some time already. Then Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine mentioned the UNHCR project in his recent trip report from the jCertif conference in Congo: "Stanyslas from Kinshasa presented the NetBeans Platform for building rich applications and in particular the RAMS (Refugee Assistance Management System) application he's building for the United Nations' HCR (refugee organization)." That's all pretty cool...

At the Aquarium, Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart recently posted Friday Tips #6: Port Unification, ASAdmin Options, PrimeFaces Support, Grizzly 2.0...

Here are some tips that have been recently published on Java EE 6 & GlassFish: • Port Unification in GlassFish 3 - Parts 1,2, 3 and 4...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Compared with past JavaOnes, will this year's JavaOne have a greater or lesser "corporate" feel? Voting will be open until next Monday.


Spotlights

Our new java.net Spotlight is from the JavaOne Conference Blog, JavaOne Preview on TechCast Live! (Tues., Sept. 7, 10am PT):

You've read the blogs, you've consumed the tweets and Facebook updates. Now how about hearing from some live humans? Next Tuesday morning (Sept. 7, 10am PT), Oracle Technology Network offers you a JavaOne preview via a live video chat with Sharat Chandar and Tori Wieldt, two people intimately familiar with the content and community aspects of the conference. You'll get insights into the content contribution process, hear about particularly interesting technical sessions and BOFs, and get a sneak peek of the contents of the Mason St. tent, where Oracle Technology Network will host the community in all its glory...

We're also still highlighting java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry's JavaOne Conference Blog post Java.net Activities at JavaOne:

I'm excited about JavaOne this year.  It's going to be different in a lot of ways, but we are doing our best to ensure that the Java.net presence for the community is just as good if not better then previous years.  In years past Java.net has had a "community corner" booth in the JavaOne pavilion at Moscone... This time we'll be housed in the Mason Street tent, which will be a large comfortable space for people from all of the technology communities to hang out, pick up swag, watch the videocasts, and see some live events too..,

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

This past week's java.net poll asked "What threat does further fragmentation of the Java language pose?" The results were somewhat surprising to me. A total of 182 votes were cast, with the following results:

  • 19% (34 votes) - It will destroy Java
  • 27% (49 votes) - It's not good, but Java will survive
  • 12% (21 votes) - Java has so large an installed base that it doesn't matter
  • 28% (51 votes) - Having different Java/JVM flavors is a good thing
  • 13% (24 votes) - I don't know
  • 2% (3 votes) - Other

What surprises me about this is the option that received the most votes, "Having different Java/JVM flavors is a good thing." I did not expect that option to receive many votes. Of course, at only 28%, it's not like anywhere near a majority of the voters expressed this view. In fact, 46% of the voters consider fragmentation a problem (summing the "It will destroy Java" votes and the "It's not good, but Java will survive" votes).

New Poll: "Corporate" feel at JavaOne?

Our new poll asks about people's expectations for the "feel" of this year's JavaOne, now that it's being run by Oracle rather than by Sun. The poll asks: Compared with past JavaOnes, will this year's JavaOne have a greater or lesser "corporate" feel? Voting will be open for the next week.

Java Today

Dustin Marx considers the fact that it's A Fortnight to JavaOne 2010:

With two weeks to JavaOne 2010, the frequency of blog posts related to JavaOne is rising as excitement for the coming conference builds.  In this post, I reference and summarize several of these.  I also begin what I hope is a once-per day (until JavaOne begins) focus on a JavaOne 2010 abstract that seems particularly interesting to me. For today, that will be at the end of this post. Several people with long experience with Java development and with JavaOne conferences have recognized this year's JavaOne's focus on core and fundamental Java technologies...

Adam Bien posted JavaOne Sessions Schedule Completed - First Impression, Some Criticism:

Last week I managed to schedule sessions I would like to attend. The topics are interesting and technical - really looking forward to it. Product pitches are not existent - at least I didn't found any. From the topic / session perspective - I really looking forward to this conference. From the content perspective it should be at least as good as the previous ones. (I will miss, however, the "Xtreme GUI Makeover")...

The JavaOne Conference Blog says Register Now for Amazing Prizes!

Register for Oracle OpenWorld, JavaOne and Oracle Develop, a Discover Pass or a Discover Plus Pass between September 3 and September 10, and you could win one of 10 super cool prizes: Flight of a Lifetime - A 45-minute aerobatic plane flight with Sean D. Tucker or a certified member of the Team Oracle biplane crew. Two prizes available...

Jean-Francois Arcand announces Async Http Client 1.1.0 Released:

After months of collecting feedback and adding new features, I’m happy to announce the availability of the Async Http Client Library version 1.1.0! We also promoted the project to it’s own github organization (since I’m now working for Sonatype :-) )...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Compared with past JavaOnes, will this year's JavaOne have a greater or lesser "corporate" feel? Voting will be open until next Monday.


Spotlights

Our new java.net Spotlight is from the JavaOne Conference Blog, JavaOne Preview on TechCast Live! (Tues., Sept. 7, 10am PT):

You've read the blogs, you've consumed the tweets and Facebook updates. Now how about hearing from some live humans? Next Tuesday morning (Sept. 7, 10am PT), Oracle Technology Network offers you a JavaOne preview via a live video chat with Sharat Chandar and Tori Wieldt, two people intimately familiar with the content and community aspects of the conference. You'll get insights into the content contribution process, hear about particularly interesting technical sessions and BOFs, and get a sneak peek of the contents of the Mason St. tent, where Oracle Technology Network will host the community in all its glory...

We're also still highlighting java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry's JavaOne Conference Blog post Java.net Activities at JavaOne:

I'm excited about JavaOne this year.  It's going to be different in a lot of ways, but we are doing our best to ensure that the Java.net presence for the community is just as good if not better then previous years.  In years past Java.net has had a "community corner" booth in the JavaOne pavilion at Moscone... This time we'll be housed in the Mason Street tent, which will be a large comfortable space for people from all of the technology communities to hang out, pick up swag, watch the videocasts, and see some live events too..,

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

If you'll be in the San Francisco area during JavaOne week, and you're interesting in attending some of JavaOne, but don't want to pay for the entire conference, consider purchasing a JavaOne / Oracle Develop Discoverpass. The base Discover pass costs just $75 and provides you with entry into the keynote addresses, the exhibition halls, the Mason Street Tent (where I'll be spending quite a lot of time), Oracle Mix, and more. If you'd like to attend a few sessions, consider the Discover Plus pass, which provides your choice of three OpenWorld or JavaOne / Oracle Develop sessions and some other extras, for $695.

Note that these prices are the pre-conference prices -- you need to purchase your Discover pass by September 18 to get these rates. If you purchase your pass at the conference, the cost will be $125 for the Discover pass, and $795 for the Discover Plus pass.

http://blogs.oracle.com/javaone/assets_c/2010/08/DukeFriends-thumb-379x230-8767.pngThe Mason Street Tent will be in part a gathering center for the Java community. As java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry recently reported, the tent will be the center of java.net activity at JavaOne. Though I'll be attending quite a lot of sessions, when I'm not attending a session, you'll usually find me in the tent (probably writing a blog about the last session I attended, or chatting with the community, or writing a blog about one of those chats). Java User Group leaders are expected to be setting up shop near the java.net area, and the Oracle Technology Network will also be in the area. The OTN will be featuring a full schedule of interviews and talks with key members of the Java and broader open source communities as part of its Oracle Technology Network Live program.

You can get a sneak preview of JavaOne, including what's going to be in the tent, this coming Tuesday, September 7, at 10 AM, Pacific Time, in a special edition of Justin Kestelyn's TechCast Live. See the details in the JavaOne Conference Blog's post JavaOne Preview on TechCast Live! (Tues., Sept. 7, 10am PT).

Still having doubts? Well, as Sonya notes, java.net will be located right next to the coffee and beer -- so thatshould guarantee we'll see you, right?

But, seriously, if you'd like to attend just some of JavaOne, do consider purchasing a JavaOne / Oracle Develop Discoverpass. With everything that's going to be going on in the tent, in the exhibition halls, and at the keynotes, how can you go wrong for just $75 (or $695 to be able to attend 3 sessions)?

Java Today

In the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announces a New GlassFish 3.1 Screencast: Application-scoped resources:

This short screencastdemonstrates the new application-scoped resources feature available starting with Milestone 4 of GlassFish 3.1 (the demo used promoted build #17). Such resources are bound to a module (war, ear, ejb) and as such they are created on deploy and destroyed when the module is undeployed. They are defined in a file calledglassfish-resources.xml (schema-constrained) and shipped with the archive...

At Hudson Labs, Kohsuke Kawaguchi talks about Recent label and matrix project improvement:

Today, I

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