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The most controversial JCP Executive Committee Election in recent history is fast approaching resolution: voting ends at Midnight Pacific Time November 1 (Universal Time: 8:00 AM on November 2). Plenty has been written about the election. Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart provides a compendium of key commentary in his "On the JCP EC Nominees and the Deprecation of Java on Mac OS X"post on the Aquarium blog.

You could say that what's happened, and is happening, is a continuation of the fallout from Oracle's acquisition of Sun. Of course, another way of looking at it is that this is part of the continued fallout from Sun's inability to maintain itself as viable corporate entity (i.e., one that turns a profit) in the post-dot-com-crash global economy. It's hard to be lead steward of a major technology when you're laying off thousands of excellent employees and staying just a few months ahead of bankruptcy.

From what I've seen over the years, standards committees that involve major corporations (and most software standards organizations do) are always fraught with dispute and intrigue, secret and not-so-secret bullying, and protests of innocence (sometimes justified, sometimes not), as the companies and other involved organizations fight over standardization elements that might ultimately provide themselves with a competitive advantage. Obviously, some companies are worse than others in this regard. And some organizations play the standards committee game better than others. For example, they may be seeking to influence the standards in a self-serving manner, but they're excellent at doing it more quietly than other organizations. This works really well when there's a big bad whipping boy involved (for example, a highly profitable corporation, like Microsoft, or Oracle), that can be pointed at for acting selfishly any time it's convenient to do so.

I'm talking generally, here, not specifically about the JCP. I've watched standards organizations long enough to see politics and games of all kinds. It's never pretty...

But getting back to this particular JCP EC election: one thing that's good to see is that, as we near the end of the voting period, there has been some calming of the tone of the arguments. For example, in Stephen Colebourne's "Stacking the JCP election" post, he originally encouraged "JCP members with a vote to not vote for Sam Pullara" on the grounds that Sam has a long history of working closely with Oracle VP Adam Messinger, which "gives the appearance" that Sam wouldn't be a voice that's independent from Oracle.

After Sam posted a comment to Stephen's post, asserting his independence and stating his reasoning for seeking the open seat, Stephen retracted his statement encouraging voters to not vote for Sam, and replaced it with "readers must make their own choice."

Initially, there was a lot of outcry over Oracle's silence in the face of the brewing storm. While I have no privileged inside information, it seems likely to me that some people in Oracle wondered if making public statements in the middle of a JCP election might be construed as trying to throw their weight around -- hence, compounding exactly what they were being accused of doing through Sam Pullara's and Hologic's appearance on the ballot. I think, ultimately, it became a "damned if you speak, damned if you don't" situation for Oracle.

And comment they did, eventually. The latest that I'm aware of is Adam Messinger's comment that he posted to Stephen Colebourne's blog post yesterday afternoon. Adam leads with a statement that basically confirms my theory that Oracle considered it best to keep quiet during an ongoing JCP election -- but the growing uproar over their silence in the face of all the controversy changed their minds. Adam lead-off statement:

Stephen, It is rare that I respond to posts, but in this case I wanted to clear up some misconceptions.

Adam goes on to confirm Sam Pullara's statement that, while they are good friends, there was no collaboration or even conversation between them regarding Sam's placement on the ballot. Adam then provides an argument in favor of Hologic's place on the ballot. And he briefly addresses the notion that Oracle is "stacking" the board.

To all of this, Stephen replies with: "Thank for your response, which is valuable in clearing up misconceptions. I think its now time for the votes to decide."

That is where we are. Indeed, voting has actually been open since October 19. On Tuesday, November 2, the JCP will be publishing the election results.


Java Today

Markus Eisele goes Bleeding edge - First steps with OpenJDK 7 Build b115:

Here it is. The guide, to making your first steps into the next version of Java we all are waiting for. Let all the others talk about politics. We are going to test drive what's there today. Prepare for some exciting times. Preface: This is not a true beginners topic...

Adam Bien provides Java EE 6 Server Resin 4.0.12 - a Smoke Test:

Resin 4.0 is an opensource but commercially supported, fast and easy to install Java EE 6 (WebProfile) application server. Resin is actually older than Tomcat and well known for its performance and scalability. It is actually a good interview question to ask a seasoned Java developer: "What is Resin?" :-) The test...

Dalibor Topic notes that OpenJDK != JCP:

Doug Lea's decision to resign from the JCP has been discussed by others, like Henrik. There is one thing I'd like to point out, that may not be clear to everyone reading the various opinions on blogs, etc. :OpenJDK is a very technical open source community - it's a 'codeocracy' (see this paperon how the Linux kernel works introducing the term). It's where code that may make its way into future Java SE implementations gets written, tried out, and improved by a community of developers from a variety of backgrounds. It's a really nice community, and if you are interested in participating, you can learn more about it here...

Arun Gupta looks ahead to Java EE 6 & GlassFish at Cloud Computing Expo, OTN Developer Days, Oredev, Java EE 6 Workshops, JavaOne Brasil in next 2 months!:

I'll be speaking on Java EE 6 & GlassFish at several events around the world in the next couple of months and here is a quick summary ... Lots of travel over the next couple of months ... New York City, Sweden, Czech Repbulic, Hungary, Reston, Fortaleza (Brazil), Sao Paulo. Looking forward to meet several of you...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the OTN'sVideo: Stephan Janssen on Devoxx:

Stephan Janssen, Devoxx founder, provides an overview of Devoxx 2010 in this video made exclusively for the Oracle Technology Network. As in previous years, Stephan and team have provided all the ingredients of a great Java conference for 2010. There will be lots of Oracle participation, including keynotes, sessions and BOFs. Highlights include keynotes by Mark Reinhold (Java SE: The Road Ahead), and Roberto Chinnici...

We're also highlighting the DEVOXX Supporting JUGs page:

67 Java User Groups have registered as supporting DEVOXX this year. The java.net Java User Groups Community notes that the "official" annual Java User Group leaders networking BOF at DEVOXX is scheduled for November 18 at 20:00.

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What does the announced deprecation of Java from Mac OS X mean for the future of Java on Mac platforms? Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

A look at the java.net JUG Events calendar shows a focus on Cloud Computing and NetBeans in four European Java User Group meetings that will be taking place this week and next week.

On Thursday, October 28, the Brussels JUG will be hosting Anton Epple, who will be presenting a NetBeans Rich-Client Platform Development Bootcamp:

he NetBeans Platform (RCP) is a generic framework for Swing applications. It provides the

I learned about today's lead Java Today entry (Lambdas in Java, Plan B in action) when its author, Arul Dhesiaseelan, contacted me by email. Turns out, Arul had tried to get my attention several times in the past few weeks, as he's been investigating Java 7/8 progress. (Unfortunately, I've been unavailable, or less than normally available, during that time period, due to illness. I'm well on my way back now!)

In addition to Lambdas in Java, Plan B in action, Arul recently posted Introducing Try With Resources, can project Coin become crown jewel of Java 7? and Rest of Project Coin explored, advantage Java 7.

If you're interested in what's going to be in Java 7, and especially in the features that are making their way into the latest Java 7 builds -- enabling you to try them out now -- you'll want to take a look at Arul's Java 7 series.

For example, in the Try With Resources, Arul looks at the benefits of what was formerly known as Automatic Resource Management and demonstrates how it will work using example code.

The Rest of Project Coin explored, advantage Java 7 post covers:

In his latest post, Lambdas in Java, Plan B in action, Arul refers to new Lambda draft proposal that Brian Goetz published two weeks ago. As in the other posts, Arul demonstrates how Lambda/closures will be implemented using code examples. Of course, Project Lambda will not be part of Java 7. But it's still useful to see what's being talked about implemented in code.

If you'd like to follow Arul's investigations, you can subscribe to his blog (Blogging at the speed of thought) and/or follow him on Twitter (@aruld). The six-person company he works for, Flux Corporation, develops the Flux job scheduling software, which is making inroads versus the "big boys" in the London financial sector and elsewhere. They "develop, support, and license Flux from our offices on Earth," and they also have great fun at company picnics!

http://fluxcorp.com/images/fluxies_lg.png
Arul Dhesiaseelan (bottom right?) and the rest of the Flux team at a recent company picnic


Java Today

Arul Dhesiaseelan analyzes Lambdas in Java, Plan B in action:

Recently, Brian Goetz published modified draft of the Lambda proposal. This draft is mature in terms of the direction where Lambda is heading for in the Java world and introduces some breaking changes from earlier draft to align with this direction. While there are few things that need to be sorted out, this draft is simple to understand, unlike the earlier proposals we have seen. Last week, Maurizio pushed an updated prototype that aligns with this new draft...

Former java.net Editor Chris Adamson provides some well-informed perspective on Apple's deprecating its Java for Mac OS X in shoes[1].drop();-

I’m late to the party blogging about Apple deprecating its Java for Mac OS X, with particularly good posts up from Matt Drance andLachlan O’Dea. And I’ve already posted a lot of counterpoints on the Java Posse’s Google group (see here, here, and here). So let me lead with the latest: there’s now a petitioncalling on Apple to contribute its Mac Java sources to OpenJDK. This won’t work, for at least four reasons I can think of: * Petitions never work. * Apple doesn’t listen...

Considering opportunities opened up by Apple's Java deprecation announcement, Adam Bien speculates on JDK / Java 7 on Mac OS X Lion - An Interesting Business Opportunity:

Would you pay for JDK 7 on Mac OS X? Mac OS X users are spending money for useful tools, editors and productivity extensions. Spending 20-50$ for a nice, easy to install JDK 7 port is a compelling idea (with several hundred thousands potential customers). The business model would be very similar to Linux-distributions...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announces FishCAT is Back - Now for GlassFish 3.1:

We are starting the FishCATprogram for GlassFish 3.1. Last go around FishCAT was extremely useful under the leadership of Judy. Judy is now in a different group at Oracle and no longer can help lead the project for 3.1, but most of the Team Members are still around and Richard and Manfred have graciously offered to lead the 3.1 effort with Sudipa acting as his Oracle contact...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the OTN'sVideo: Stephan Janssen on Devoxx:

Stephan Janssen, Devoxx founder, provides an overview of Devoxx 2010 in this video made exclusively for the Oracle Technology Network. As in previous years, Stephan and team have provided all the ingredients of a great Java conference for 2010. There will be lots of Oracle participation, including keynotes, sessions and BOFs. Highlights include keynotes by Mark Reinhold (Java SE: The Road Ahead), and Roberto Chinnici...

We're also highlighting the DEVOXX Supporting JUGs page:

67 Java User Groups have registered as supporting DEVOXX this year. The java.net Java User Groups Community notes that the "official" annual Java User Group leaders networking BOF at DEVOXX is scheduled for November 18 at 20:00.

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What does the announced deprecation of Java from Mac OS X mean for the future of Java on Mac platforms? Voting will be open through next Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

According to the latest java.net poll, the Java community is reacting positively to the news that IBM will be collaborating with Oracle on the OpenJDK project. A total of 267 votes were cast in the poll, which ran for the past week. Here is the actual poll question and the results:

What's your view of the news that Oracle and IBM will collaborate in the OpenJDK project?

  • 18% (48 votes) - It's the best Java news I've heard in a long time
  • 30% (81 votes) - It's definitely positive
  • 34% (90 votes) - We'll see how it works out
  • 2% (6 votes) - Makes no difference
  • 10% (27 votes) - I consider it a negative development
  • 4% (10 votes) - I don't know
  • 2% (5 votes) - Other

Summing the first three options tells us that 82% of the voters think or hope that IBM collaboration in OpenJDK will produce positive results. Only 10% of the voters consider the collaboration to have a downside (unfortunately, no one took the time to post a comment describing the downsides they see).

New poll: Apple's Java announcement and the future of Java on Mac

The new java.net poll focuses on the Apple announcement that its Java port is being deprecated. This new poll perhaps has a relationship with the previous poll, if one considers the OpenJDK as potentially filling the Java gap that will be left on Mac platforms due to Apple's decision.

The new poll asks What does the announced deprecation of Java from Mac OS X mean for the future of Java on Mac platforms? Voting will be open for the next week.


Java Today

Dustin Marx provides Ten Tips for Using Java Stack Traces:

Most Java developers are somewhat familiar with Java stack traces and how to read and analyze stack traces. However, for beginning Java developers, there are some areas of stack traces that might be a little confusing. In this post, I look at some tips for reading Java stack traces and responding appropriately based on what the stack trace reports...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine introduces A practical guide to configuring and testing GlassFish 3.1 Clustering:

The main theme for GlassFish 3.1 is clustering which really encompasses centralized admin, load-balancing and in-memory state replication (HA). These features are all available in the 2.x family and are now being introduced in the OSGi-based and JavaEE6-compatible GlassFish product. While a lot of engineering time has been spent on making the clustering configuration as easy as possible...

Adam Bien recalls Steve Jobs at JavaOne, Mac OS X and Java, then fast-forwards to today:

Scott McNealy and Steve Jobs at JavaOne. "...One of the big surprises was the presence of the venerable Steve Jobs. Jobs underscored the commitment by Apple Computer to ship the Java 2 Standard Edition (J2SE) with their upcoming MacOS X release later this year. This is great news for Mac users and Java developers alike..."

The JCP Program Office announces the availability of the JCP EC Elections Discussion Board:

The final phase of the 2010 JCP program EC Elections is going on now and ends November 1 at midnight PST (November 2 at 8:00 AM UTC). This is an opportunity to have your thoughts, views, and opinions heard-all while helping shape the future of Java technology. There is a discussion board on jcp.org for community members to post questions to the candidates for the 2010 JCP EC Elections...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the DEVOXX Supporting JUGs page:

67 Java User Groups have registered as supporting DEVOXX this year. The java.net Java User Groups Community notes that the "official" annual Java User Group leaders networking BOF at DEVOXX is scheduled for November 18 at 20:00.

We're also highlighting Jim Weaver's "Eye on Visage: Compiler Preview #1 Available":

The Visage Programming Language is moving forward, with Compiler Preview #1 available now.  This preview features Default Properties, which create a simplified syntax that makes it easier to read nested data structures.  A logo has also been chosen for the project as well...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What does the announced deprecation of Java from Mac OS X mean for the future of Java on Mac platforms? Voting will be open through next Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The Egypt Java User Group is celebrating its fifth birthday today. I wish them a happy gathering this evening!

This morning I strolled around the Egypt JUG web site, and found quite a lot of interesting material. The home page is divided into sections, with the middle section being a list of "Latest Contents" and the latest posts to the site. The latest contents are divided into:

  • Latest Forum Topics
  • Latest Articles
  • Latest Jobs
  • Latest blog posts

The Navigation section on the right includes a link to the EGJUG's java.net page, along with links to recent posts, top contributors, and where visitors come from. While the ClustrMap doesn't show a whole lot of visitors, the vistors are spread across four continents (Africa, Europe, Asia, North America).

The EGJUG's java.net page says the JUG was formed in 2006, is the top JUG in the Middle East and Africa, and one of the top 50 JUGs globally. The page expresses a plan to start monthly meetings.

It's difficult to say how often the EGJUG actually meets, based solely on the web site. This could be because the site isn't kept entirely up to date (admittedly a difficult thing to do, when you have a job and you're also leading a Java User Group). The last documented meeting prior to today's birthday celebration was on May 2, 2010, Meeting#16: Java 7 new features by Svetlin Nakov. This meeting covered:

  • the new deployment model in the Java platform
  • superpackages and Java modules
  • the new input output system (NIO2)
  • asynchronous sockets and files
  • the new file system API
  • the new date and time APIs
  • the new concurrency utilities
  • the Swing application framework
  • Java media components
  • JavaBeans validation
  • JMX 2.0
  • the new language features (strings in switch, enumerations comparison, chained invocation constructors, extension methods, exceptions multi-catch, simplified null handling, automatic type inference)
  • the enhanced annotations
  • the dynamic language support enhancements
  • the Java kernel
  • new garbage collector (G1), etc.

In other words, members of the Egypt JUG are talking about the same topics we're all talking about.

EGJUG does have some outside support. Their sponsors include Google, International Turnkey Systems (a leading integrated information technolology solutions and software services provider), iCraft (a system integration and consultancy service provider focusing on Open Source Software), anditida (the Egyptian Information Technology Industry Development Agency).

An interesting feature on the left column of the EGJUG site is the "Black Belt Factory." This lists members who have recently passed aBlackBeltFactoryexam. By clicking the link for Ahmed Hashim, I was brought to Ahmed's BlackBeltFactory profile. Ahmed has passed 21 BlackBelt Factory exams! His profile also tells us:

I have been rewarded on December 2007 as Java Champion by Sun Java Champion community. I am the founder and leader of the Egyptian Java User Group http://www.egjug.org. I am frequent speaker in local events talking about Java technology and OpenSourceSoftware.

Happy Birthday EGJUG! Have a great celebration this evening!


Java Today

The Egypt JUG celebrates its 5th birthday today! Here's the EGJUG's 5th birthdayannouncement:

Dear EGJUG Member, We would like to invite you to our special celebration of EGJUG's 5th birthday we are inviting all EGJUG members so there will be a lot of stuff that we can talk about and share ... Share our joy and have some cake while talking and sharing the vision and the future plan for EGJUG...

The JCP discusses the JCP 2010 EC ELections Ballot:

The 2010 Java Community Process (JCP) Program Executive Committee (EC) elections process is underway. The EC Elections process was launched in June 2000. This years' elections are hosted by Votenet and run October 19 - November 1, 2010. JCP Members may vote in the EC Elections...

Geertjan Wielenga presents a batch of Commercial NetBeans RCP Applications from Argentina:

Another bunch of YANPA's today, this time from Argentina, screenshots made available by Gustavo Santucho. Description: Defect tracking application. Deployed on tablet-like devices, i.e., the team tried to build something that could be used with a "pen" in the field. Originally for a construction site defect-tracking and completion analysis company...

IBM's WebSphere Application Server V8.0 Beta has been released. The 8.0 Beta version includes:

support for portions of key Java™ Enterprise Edition 6.0 specifications including: * Enterprise JavaBeans 3.1; * Java Persistence API (JPA) 2.0; * JavaServer Faces (JSF) 2.0; * JavaServer Pages (JSP) 2.2; * Servlet 3.0; * Java EE Connector Architecture 1.6; * Contexts and Dependency Injection for Java (CDI) ...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Jim Weaver's "Eye on Visage: Compiler Preview #1 Available":

The Visage Programming Language is moving forward, with Compiler Preview #1 available now.  This preview features Default Properties, which create a simplified syntax that makes it easier to read nested data structures.  A logo has also been chosen for the project as well...

We're also highlighting the "Oracle and IBM Collaborate to Accelerate Java Innovation Through OpenJDK"announcement:

Oracle and IBM today announced that the companies will collaborate to allow developers and customers to build and innovate based on existing Java investments and the OpenJDK reference implementation. Specifically, the companies will collaborate in the OpenJDK community to develop the leading open source Java environment...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of the news that Oracle and IBM will collaborate on the OpenJDK project? Voting will be open for the next week.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

The Silicon Valley Web Java User Group has postponed tonight's event featuring James Gosling. On the JUG's announce mailing list today, Van Riper reported: "James Gosling had to cancel his appearance at the last minute. We are working with him to reschedule it hopefully at our usual meeting time next month..."

The SV Web JUG has tentatively rescheduledJames's talk for their next regularly-scheduled meeting on November 17 at 6:00 PM at the Googleplex.

Scanning the JUG Eventscalendar, today and the remainder of this week include the following JUG meetings:

Wednesday, October 20

The future of Java is the just-ended java.net poll and our new poll. The just-ended poll was based on Markus Eisele's September 30 blog post, Java SE 7, 8, 9 - The Road Ahead. The poll ran for two weeks; 454 votes were cast, with the following results:

Free Java? Closed Java? Evolving JCP? What's the Most Likely Path?

  • 24% (108 votes) - Free Java! (Forget the JCP, just create a free public open source Java repository)
  • 49% (224 votes) - Free the JCP! (Open the jcp and make it independent from Oracle)
  • 7% (34 votes) - Java as a product (within Oracle - simple product licensing for 3rd parties. No jcp.)
  • 8% (37 votes) - Anything in between or mixing the above
  • 2% (11 votes) - Other
  • 9% (40 votes) - I don't know

This is an unusually clear result for java.net polls. Setting aside the "I don't know" responses, a majority of the voters favor freeing the JCP. Still, a substantial group prefer the "Free Java" option, where the language becomes a free, public, open source project.

Four comments were posted. magnum didn't consider it a good idea for a major programming language not to have a corporate leader, and also approves of the JCP in its present relationship with Oracle:

There is much more openness and discussion about Java future than in all other major (evolving) languages, so JCP, though not perfect, is better than what we have in other languages.

An anonymous commenter disagreed:

I vote for JCP becoming an independent organization with democratic but productive mechanisms where everyone can participate and contribute. Then Java will be free.

New poll: Oracle and IBM and OpenJDK collaboration

Our new java.net poll highlight's last week's joint Oracle/IBM announcement. The poll asks: What's your view of the news that Oracle and IBM will collaborate on the OpenJDK project? Voting will be open until next Monday.


Java Today

Stephen Chin will be talking about JavaFX 2.0 With Alternative Languages at the SvJugFx:

It is kind of ironic, but after a year running I have never spoken at my own user group. In November I am going to break the trend and present an updated version of the JavaFX Alternative Language talk that I gave at JavaOne. You can sign-up for the event here: http://www.svjugfx.org/calendar/14264038/...

Markus Eisele presents Java SE 7 - new features in detail:

A lot has been talked about the planned roadmap. And up to now it seems as if it is still not sure, that we will have a new Java SE 7 as planned (Mid 2011), but I thought it may be time to take a deeper look at what's in it and give you a collection of further readings on the separate topics. Following the post by Mark Reinhold from yesterday...

Dustin Marx reviews the history of Java in his post IBM and Oracle Are Behind OpenJDK!:

Years from now, when we all bore our grandchildren with stories of the history of the Java programming language, the date of 11 October 2010 may be considered a landmark date in Java's history. For on that date, the two biggest players in all of Javadom agreed to collaborate on OpenJDK. In this post, I briefly look at the long and winding road that got us here (see The Java History Timeline for additional details)...

Roger Yeung announces that Java SE 6 Update 22 is out!:

Java SE 6 Update 22 is now available for download. This release includes performance improvements, several security vulnerabilities fixes, and support for new platforms. Check out therelease notes for more information.

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the "Oracle and IBM Collaborate to Accelerate Java Innovation Through OpenJDK"announcement:

Oracle and IBM today announced that the companies will collaborate to allow developers and customers to build and innovate based on existing Java investments and the OpenJDK reference implementation. Specifically, the companies will collaborate in the OpenJDK community to develop the leading open source Java environment...

We're also featuring Now OPEN -- Nominations for EC seats:

It is Election time again...the JCP program Executive Committee (EC) Elections are officially here. Every year five seats on each EC are open for election (ratified and nominated)...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's your view of the news that Oracle and IBM will collaborate on the OpenJDK project? Voting will be open for the next week.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Oracle and IBM have announcedthat IBM is joining the OpenJDK project:

the companies will collaborate to allow developers and customers to build and innovate based on existing Java investments and the OpenJDK reference implementation. Specifically, the companies will collaborate in the OpenJDK community to develop the leading open source Java environment.

With today’s news, the two companies will make the OpenJDK community the primary location for open source Java SE development. The Java Community Process (JCP) will continue to be the primary standards body for Java specification work and both companies will work to continue to enhance the JCP.

The collaboration will center on the OpenJDK project, the open source implementation of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) specification, the Java Language, the Java Development Kit (JDK) and the Java Runtime Environment (JRE).

Rod Smith, Vice President,Emerging Technologies, IBM, said:

IBM, Oracle and other members of the Java community working collaboratively in OpenJDK will accelerate the innovation in the Java platform. Oracle and IBM’s collaboration also signals to enterprise customers that they can continue to rely on the Java community to deliver more open, flexible and innovative new technologies to help grow their business.

For additional commentary on this news, see:


Java Today

Dustin Marx provides Seven Indispensable NetBeans Java Hints:

I have found NetBeans Java Hints to be extremely useful in Java development. In this blog post I look at NetBeans Java Hints that I deem indispensable in Java development. I will be using NetBeans 6.9 for the screen snapshots in this post. As this Wiki page indicates, there are numerous hints new to NetBeans 6.9...

Stephen Chin announces that Apropos Launches into the Stratus:

Followers of my blog have probably heard about the Apropos project that I built in JavaFX and released as open-source. It is an Agile Project Portfolio Planning tool that I developed for work to help manage our large Agile rollout. Apropos is a perfect application of rich client technology, because it sits on top of the web services exposed by Rally, and provides a higher level of visibility and planning. The folks at Rally Software took notice and have been contributing back to the project...

Jeff Friesen investigates Java Hostname and IP address conversions:

While developing networking code in Java, you might find yourself needing to convert a hostname to an IP address and vice versa. The java.net.InetAddress class provides the means to accomplish these tasks via its public static InetAddress getByName(String hostname), public String getHostAddress() and public String getHostName() methods...

Arun Gupta presents his Java2Days 2010 Trip Report:

Java2Days 2010 in Sofia, Bulgaria was my first trip to Eastern Europe. I spent more time flying than actually in the city because of personal reasons but enjoyed the conference. There were approx 500 attendees but this being the only major conference in this part of the world, its only bound to grow. The Day 1 conference started late...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JCP's announcement, Now OPEN -- Nominations for EC seats:

It is Election time again...the JCP program Executive Committee (EC) Elections are officially here. Every year five seats on each EC are open for election (ratified and nominated)...

We're also featuring Oracle Technology Network Live - Oracle OpenWorld, JavaOne and Oracle Develop Edition, posted by the JavaOne Conference Blog:

During Oracle OpenWorld, JavaOne and Oracle Develop the Oracle Technology Network team conducted three days of live interviews.Oracle Technology Network's Justin Kestelyn, Rick Ramsey, Tori Wieldt, Bob Rhubart, Sonya Barry and Yolande Poirier hosted dozens of community experts on the latest news and buzz.To see the replay go here!...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Free Java? Closed Java? Evolving JCP? What's the Most Likely Path? Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

I spent much of today looking at resources that are available toJava User Groups on java.net and elsewhere. It seems to me that, while the major Java-related conferences (like JavaOneand DEVOXX) are very significant, a lot of the background activity that makes these conferences significant happens within the global network of Java User Groups. JUGs are a "grass-roots" network of developers who are deeply interested in Java and JVM technologies. Almost everything that is discussed at the major conferences has been discussed at many different JUG meetings.

On java.net, JUGs have a major presence. We have both a Java User Groups Community and a JUGs project. The JUGs project features a Google Map that highlights world-wide Java User Groups.

Using the map, you can click on an individual JUG and get information about that user group. For example, I clicked on the Wellington, New Zealand bubble, and found a link to the Wellington Java User Groupsite.

Another interesting java.net page is the Java User Groups Projects page, which provides links to the 600 or so JUGs that are registered on java.net. One might be near you!

The JUG Events page provides links to upcoming JUG-related events. If your JUG wants to further publicize your upcoming events, this is a great place for doing so.

java.net also provides JUG wikis. These provide another opportunity for JUGs to publicize their information and engage with their communities.

I intend to increase our java.net coverage of JUGs and JUG resources in the coming months. My plans include interviews (email, phone, IM, whatever works) with JUG members and leaders. Contact me if you've got JUG news you'd like publicized on java.net, or if you're a JUG member and you'd like to talk about your JUG's activity, history, the role of JUGs in your community, etc.


Java Today

Mario Torre comments on Java One 2010:

I finally found some little time to blog about this JavaOne, despite the million things I have to do daily... The overall experience was incredible, I meet some good old friends and some cool new guys. I finally had the opportunity to meet Chris Campbell, our paths have crossed for quite some time, but we never had a chance to meet personally...

Dan T posted Hadoop Lab Now Available:

I was really surprised at the turn-out for JavaOne this year. Judging by the packed halls and empty goodie carts, I think the conference organizers were a little surprised as well. Excellent! Well done. As you may have noticed, I always seem to have my fingers in the JavaOne hands-on labs pie. This year my contribution was to bring Cloudera into the fold to run a Hadoop lab...

Markus Eisele presents a book Review "Java EE 6 with GlassFish 3 Application Server" by David Heffelfinger (PACKT Publishing):

Packt Publishing was so kind, sending me their latest Java EE 6 with GlassFish 3 book for a detailed review.After a couple of weeks delay (work, J1 and more) I finally completed my review and here are the results from the German jury ;) ...

Hudson Labs announces the upcoming Hudson User meetup in Tokyo:

I'm traveling to Tokyo in November, so I am taking this opportunity to host a Hudson user meetup in Tokyo. The event will be held Nov 12th 19:00, the location is to be determined. Please RSVP from here, and more information and updates will be posted here...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JCP's announcement, Now OPEN -- Nominations for EC seats:

It is Election time again...the JCP program Executive Committee (EC) Elections are officially here. Every year five seats on each EC are open for election (ratified and nominated)...

We're also featuring Oracle Technology Network Live - Oracle OpenWorld, JavaOne and Oracle Develop Edition, posted by the JavaOne Conference Blog:

During Oracle OpenWorld, JavaOne and Oracle Develop the Oracle Technology Network team conducted three days of live interviews.Oracle Technology Network's Justin Kestelyn, Rick Ramsey, Tori Wieldt, Bob Rhubart, Sonya Barry and Yolande Poirier hosted dozens of community experts on the latest news and buzz.To see the replay go here!...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks Free Java? Closed Java? Evolving JCP? What's the Most Likely Path? Voting will be open until Monday.


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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

Nearly have of the people who voted in our last poll consider JavaOne to still be the most important Java-centric conference. A total of 276 votes were cast, with the following results:

Is JavaOne still the most important Java-centric conference?

  • 44% (122 votes) - Yes
  • 15% (42 votes) - No
  • 17% (46 votes) - Maybe
  • 1% (4 votes) - Other
  • 22% (62 votes) - I don't know

Of the people who expressed an opinion (i.e., they didn't select "I don't know"), 57% selected "yes." Meanwhile, just under 20% of those expressing an opinion selected "no."

So, based on this (unscientific) poll, it looks like JavaOne 2010 was sufficiently successful that people still consider the conference the most important Java-related conference. The quality and variety of the conference sessions was pretty much universally acclaimed. The most widespread complaint I've seen is about the geography of this year's edition -- long walks between the hotels and Moscone, sometimes multiple times per day (if you wanted to see two sets of keynotes). Perhaps this problem can be rectified for JavaOne 2011.

New poll: Java's future?

The new java.net poll is based on Markus Eisele's recent blog post "Java SE 7, 8, 9 - The Road Ahead". Our poll is titled "Free Java? Closed Java? Evolving JCP? What's the Most Likely Path?" Voting is open until Monday.


Java Today

Jim Weaver investigates The Visage Programming Language: Expressionism meets UI Development -

Visage Sur Fond Vert ("face on a green background") is a painting by Henry Matisse, whose mastery of the expressive language of color and drawing won him recognition as a leading figure in modern art.  In this post I'd like to help bring to light Visage, the expressive programming language for creating user interfaces. Two things that hooked me on JavaFX were...

Arun Gupta writes about RedFX: JavaFX Widget Library for GlassFish -

RedFX provides a JavaFX widget library that connects front-end JavaFX widgets with services running on GlassFish, without writing any boiler plate code. Why they picked GlassFish ? * Its the Reference Implementation of Java EE 6 and contains all the latest specifications implemented. * First-class open source application server. * Quality is very very good. * Scalability is enormous. * Code is very easy to understand...

Dalibor Topic points out JavaOne Interviews: Mark Reinhold:

The JavaPossepodcast has published an interviewwith Mark Reinhold, Chief Architect of the Java Platform Group at Oracle "about Java 7, Java 8, Plan B and beyond". In addition, as JAXenter reports, the Oracle Media Network has published a Java Update video interview Tori Wieldt did with Mark Reinhold during OTN Live 2010...

Kirill Grouchnikov presents Design, uninterrupted #77:

Today

The JavaOne Latin America Conference Call for Papers ends this Friday, October 8. The conference, which will take place December 7-9 at the Transamerica Expo Center in Sao Paulo Brazil, will include both JavaOne and Oracle Develop. Arun Gupta and Dalibor Topic are already expressing their excitement about a JavaOne conference in Brazil.

http://www.openworldlad.com.br/imagens/Confirmation_Email_header_PTBR.jpg

Despite its presence on the conference banner image, I don't see any indication that a Latin American Oracle Open World will be happening concurrently.

Getting back to the papers: once they're submitted, there will be a period ending October 27 during which the papers will be assessed. So, by late October or early November, everyone should know if their papers / proposed sessions have been accepted.

The conference will include the following tracks:

  1. Core Java Platform
  2. Desktop Java
  3. Java EE Web Profile and Platform Technologies
  4. Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
  5. JavaFX and Rich User Experience
  6. Java ME and Mobile
  7. Java for Devices, Card and TV
  8. The Java Frontier

Go to the Submissionpage when you're ready to submit your paper / session proposal. Just be sure to do it by Friday, October 8.


Java Today

HotSpot developer John Rose talks about larval objects in the VM:

Or, the ascent from squishy to crunchy. I want to talk about initialization of immutable data structures on the JVM. But first I want to note that, in good news for Latin lovers (and those with Latin homework), Google has made Latin translation available ad stupor mundi. That has nothing to do with Java, but it reminds me of a Java design pattern that deserves to be unmasked and recognized: The larval stage. The idea (which will be instantly familiar to experienced programmers) is that every Java data structure goes through a construction phase during which it is incomplete, and at some point becomes mature enough to publish generally. This pattern is most readily seen in Java constructors themselves. Thethis value during the execution of an object’s constructor in general contains uninitialized fields...

Jean-Francois Arcand demonstrates how to accomplish Real Time Twitter Search via Websocket or Comet using the Atmosphere Framework:

Currently Twitter support a streaming API described as: "The Twitter Streaming API allows high-throughput near-realtime access to various subsets of public and protected Twitter data." Unfortunately, no such API are available when it is time to execute real time search. Thanks to the freshly released Atmosphere Framework 0.6.2, let’s create such API in less than 25 lines. As an extra, let’s the Atmosphere JQuery Plugin selects the best transport for communicating with this API: Websocket, http-streaming or long-polling...

Jeff Friesen discusses Swing's event-dispatching thread:

The event-dispatching thread is the thread that executes all drawing and event-handling code in a Swing application. For example, the code within a Swing component'spaintComponent(Graphics) method and the code within a Swing button's actionPerformed(ActionEvent) method is always executed on the event-dispatching thread. Because Swing is a single-threaded graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit, you must create an application's Swing user interface on the event-dispatching thread. Listing 1 ...

Arun Gupta presents his Java EE 6 & GlassFish @ JAX London & London JUG Trip Report:

JAX London had its second conference of the year and the venue was shared with DevCon and OSGi DevCon. The tri-partite conference gave the attendees an option to attend a variety of sessions from a good quality of speakers. There were about approximately 250 attendees and I think the number is commendable considering this is only the second conference. The good news is that there is only room to grow :-) ...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Terrence Barr's JavaOne 2010: Takeaways for Mobile & Embedded -

Now that JavaOne is done it

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