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Have you voted in the current java.net poll yet? The poll asksWhich area of Java/JVM technology most desperately needs serious attention in 2011?

There has been plenty of recent discussion about new directions and areas of focus for Java platform development for the coming year and beyond. But, are the areas that are being discussed the areas that developers consider to need the most attention? Or are some very important aspects of the Java platform being neglected, or even left behind?

Share your view by voting, if you haven't done so already. Or even if you've already voted, consider posting a comment that reflects your view.

The poll will close on Monday.


Java Today

Shai Almog writes about a new Location Based Cross Platform Game In LWUIT:

I have been negligent in posting about cool new LWUIT app's mostly because I have so much to do, however Chen insisted I post about Tourality and I agree it is different. Its a location based game written for all platforms with LWUIT, it runs on Android, Blackberry & J2ME. The upcoming iPhone version probably won't be based on LWUIT though ;-) In the words of its author: "Tourality is a location based scavenger hunt game..."

Geertjan Wielenga is training Lots of Danes on the NetBeans Platform:

Odense, Denmark, isn't one of the world's largest places (still, the 3rd largest city of Denmark), which makes it all the more remarkable that there was such a large turnout (around 30) on the 1st day of the 3-day training held at the University of Southern Denmarktoday. After the course is over, the students will need to do a report, as part of their official university course...

Kirill Grouchnikov talks about Designing pixels:

User friendly, responsive and visually pleasing applications don

This past week's poll asked developers to complete the sentence "Java's Best Days Are..." The voting did not produce a clear result. A total of 277 votes were cast, with the following results:

Java's Best Days Are...

  • 26% (73 votes) - Ahead of it
  • 22% (61 votes) - Right now
  • 36% (101 votes) - Behind it
  • 15% (42 votes) - I don't know

While 36% of voters say Java's best days are behind it, 48% of voters disagree, saying Java's best days are either right now or in the years ahead.

A poll very similar to this one was run in the spring of 2005, almost five years ago (the only difference was that the earlier poll did not have an "I don't know" option). In that poll, 55% considered Java's best days to be ahead, 29% right now, and 15% behind it.

These are of course unscientific results. But, you can still say that, based on the poll results, five years ago only a small minority of developers considered Java's best days to be behind it, and a majority felt the best days were yet to come; whereas today, more developers have doubts, and a minority considers Java's best days to be ahead of it.

Again, these polls are voluntary surveys, so these conclusions must be taken with a grain of salt. Still, the comparative results are interesting.


Java Today

Joseph Darcy announces Project Coin: Safe Varargs in JDK Libraries -

Back for JDK 7 build 123, the language support for the Project Coin's safe varargs feature was pushed; the time has come to update the libraries to take advantage of this feature. Following the same general methodology used to systematically flush out types that should be madeCloseable or AutoCloseable, I wrote an annotation processor to identify candidate varargs methods and constructors where...

In the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine reports the JCP votes are in, work on JPA 2.1 and JAX-RS 2.0 JSRs can start:

The voting period for the newly proposed JPA 2.1 and JAX-RS 2.0 JSRs (both tentatively scheduled for inclusion in Java EE 7) has now ended and the results are identical for both JSRs - 11 YES votes, 0 NO vote, and two EC members not casting in their vote. You can find the details on these respective pages...

JUG-AFRICAPresident Jean-Fran

http://www.itbhu.ac.in/codefest/images/codefest-logo.gifI just registered for CodeFest '11, the international coding festival organized by the Department of Computer Engineering, at the Institude of Technology, Banaras Hindu University (IT-BHU, located in Varanasi,India). This is the second annual CodeFest. Last year's edition brought 2345 registrations, including 128 professions (most of the registrants are college students). CodeFest '11 as planned is "bigger and better":

Exhilarated with the phenomenal success of CodeFest '10, this year Team CodeFest has come up with even more challenging events, extensive technical coverage and prize money. CodeFest '11 shall not only seek to put your intelligence to test but also trigger out-of-the-box thinking. This year, we hope to augment this coding extravaganza. We can absolutely guarantee your programming satisfaction. Are you ready to embrace challenges and unleash the coder within you?

CodeFest doesn't test programming skills alone. Rather:

CodeFest is a unique fest wherein concepts of Mathematics, logic, Artificial Intelligence, algorithms, language syntax, etc. are required to be deployed in programming; these concepts manifest themselves in solving problems effectively and efficiently!

I first found out about CodeFest '11 from the event announcment that was posted on IndiJava.in (India's Java User Group). Here's their summary of the online events that are part of CodeFest '11:

  • Manthan: An algorithm intensive programming contest that would require coders to tailor existing standard algorithms to solve real life computation problems.
  • Virtual Combat: An educational game wherein teams of programmed robotic tanks will fight the battles for glory.Codes Do Fight! Watch this out.
  • Perplexed: A programming contest, aimed to test the knowledge of C, wherein codes will be rewarded against syntactic constraints.
  • Ratespiel: A technical quiz covering different areas of Computer Science.
  • This year CodeFest, in association with Technex'11, brings onsite events:
  • Eniac: An open software exhibition where you get an opportunity to demonstrate your software from any domain.
  • Code Warrior: A multiple round contest to award the title of 'ultimate computer geek'.

See the CodeFest FAQ for more details. While college students can participate in all events, two of the events ("Manthan" and "Perplexed!") are also open to professionals as well.

The first event starts this coming Friday, January 28, so if you'd like to participate, visit the CodeFest site and register soon.


Java Today

Adam Bien visits JUG Transylvania and finds the Palinca Distillery, No Draculas, Java EE 6 and NotEnoughChairsException:

The two excellent organized JUG Transylvania events are over. Special thanks to Nokia (especially Tiberiu) and ZeroTurnAround for sponsoring this event and Gabriel Pop (the JUG Transylvania CEO :-)) for the perfect organization! At the first day I asked the attendees what application to implement with Java EE 6 - and suggested something Dracula related. The response was clear - they are already Dracula-tired and preferred a Palinca (local hard liquor) Distillery (PalincaPalincie). We developed together a Java EE 6 application with JSF 2 + AJAX, EJB 3.1 (singleton, schedules, asynchronous), JPA 2 (inheritance, relations), REST, AJAX, CDI (qualifiers, events, producers) and Bean Validation...

Joe Darcy presents Project Coin: JSR 334 Expert Group Update -

Besides working to address issues identified in the EDR draft, such as refining the diamond specification, the JSR 334 expert group has been considering other matters as well. One change being contemplated is removing the ability to have multiple underscores between digits of a literal; under that possible change, no underscore or a single underscore would be allowed. The primary consideration here is to prevent abuses of the underscores in literal feature...

Markus Eisele combines WebLogic 10.3.4.0 + OEPE + Maven + Primefaces 2.2RC:

The new WebLogic is there since a few days and we are right in front of another new release of another component: Primefaces 2.2 has RC state at the moment and we are all waiting for a final release happening hopefully the next time. If you are willing to give the existing RC a test drive you can follow this short blog in which I try to shortly summarize the steps necessary to take to get one of my favorite development setups...

Matt Raible reports on Making Code Generation Smarter with Maven:

As you might've read in my last entry, I recently started a new gig with Overstock.com. On my first day, I was quickly immersed into the development process by joining the Conversion Team. The Conversion Team is responsible for developing the checkout UI and handling payments from customers. I quickly discovered Overstock was mostly a Linux + Eclipse Shop and did my best to get my favorite Mac + IntelliJ + JRebel installed and configured...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Lincoln Baxter's How-to: Modular Java EE Applications with CDI and PrettyFaces-

I was recently asked the question, "Is it possible to create a modular JSF application, where JAR-files act as plug-ins and allow xhtml views, images, css, navigation rules, and managed beans to be added as modules to the application?" The answer to this question is, "of course," but there is no pre-set way of accomplishing such a task, so you

Last night, at the Portland Java User Group's first meeting of the new year, Merlyn Albery-Speyer was scheduled to speak about Gradle, the project automation tool. Or, rather than speak, Merlyn's plan was to engage the audience in live experimentation with Gradle. In the preview for his visit, Merlyn wrote:

For this session, there won't be any slides. I'm also not going to stand up and talk at you. Instead, I'm going to rely heavily on your involvement. I'll start with an introduction to Gradle, and then very quickly go into using it in practice. After a few minutes of that I'll open it up to go wherever we're most interested in.

In other words, rather than summarize what Gradle is and what it offers, Merlyn's plan was to fire up Gradle on a computer, do a few quick demonstrations, then open up the floor. Merlyn wrote:

Do this ahead of time: What is your intention for the session? Spend some time deliberately focusing on what it is you want out of the session. Bring that will you and share it with us.

This approach is one that more people seem to be finding ideal for getting developers involved with, or introducing, unfamiliar technologies. For example, Java Champion Adam Bien has been giving what he calls "free Java EE hacking sessions" at various JUG meetings and conferences in Europe. It's something that he finds works out quite well.

About the Portland JUG

I came upon the Portland JUG from a simple search on Google. I believe the JUG leader is Jon Batcheller. At least, he is the person who has organized the monthly PJUG meetings for the past several years.

The PJUG site is fairly basic. The home page consists of a history of the presentations that were made at the group's meetings, dating back to 2004. Just browsing what was featured at the meetings provides an interesting historical overview of what's happened in the Java/JVM world in the past seven years or so.

The site also includes a Java Resources page, and you can browse the Portland JUG Mailing List Archives as well. You can also follow @PJUG on Twitter.

If you live in the Portland, Oregon area, consider attending one of the upcoming meetings (February 15, March 15, April 19, May 17). The January meeting was held at Oracle's Downtown Campus, in the Pacwest Center.


Java Today

The Silicon Valley Web JUG will be hosting Patrick Curran for a discussion on The JCP and the JUG Community:

Patrick will talk about the role of the JCP in the development and evolution of Java, and about the ways in which Java User Groups and their members can participate in the process. However, he's more interested in listening than talking, and hopes to engage in a constructive and mutually-interesting dialog...

The OTN Garage answers the question Where'd the Docs Go?

A few minutes ago, if you entered www.ducks.com into your browser, you would have wound up in a outdoor supplies store. How boring is that? U. of Oregon0, Unbridled Capitalism 1. If, on the other hand, you would have entered http://docs.sun.com into your browser window, you would have gone to the old Sun documentation site. You know, the one that screamed this in big red letters...

Geertjan Wielenga has discovered National Security Simulations on the NetBeans Platform:

Sandia, a Lockheed Martin company involved with science-based technologies supporting US national security, has at least two applications on top of the NetBeans Platform. * Cognitive Architect. A prototype application developed by the Cognitive Systems group at Sandia National Laboratories1 to interactively construct or learn sophisticated information-flow-processing models from relevant data...

Arun Gupta looks ahead to Java EE Day @ JAX San Jose 2011:

After conducting multiple conferences, primarily in Europe, and some in other parts of the world, for many years, JAX is now coming to the USA as well. And that too right in the heart of Silicon Valley, in the downtown San Jose. The Call for Papers ends on Jan 21 and allows you to submit papers in several different tracks such as Java Core, Java Enterprise, JSF Summit, Web Tech, Agile Tools & ALM, Cloud, Mobile, and many others...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Podcast 12: Adam Bien -

Interview with Adam Bien, Java Champion, consultant, lecturer, speaker, software architect, developer, and author of Java books, on just about everything related to Java. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel is Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE evangelist...

We're also featuring Arun Gupta's entry on the "Stories" blog,CEJUG - Manage your JUGs using GlassFish:

Typically the JUG members are identified by subscribers on a mailing list. This however does not provide enough information about the members to the JUG leaders. The Cear

Despite all the commotion and publicly displayed displeasure regarding recent events in the Java world, developers who participated in last week's java.net poll overwhelmingly recommend learning Java to developers who are seeking to add a language to their programming repertoire. A total of 331 votes were cast, with the following results:

Would you recommend learning Java to today's college students and developers who want to add to their skill set?

  • 29% (97 votes) - Absolutely!
  • 54% (178 votes) - Yes, but I wouldn't advise knowing only Java
  • 4% (13 votes) - Maybe
  • 7% (24 votes) - I'd warn them against learning Java, due to recent events
  • 4% (13 votes) - Absolutely not!
  • 1% (3 votes) - I don't know
  • 1% (3 votes) - Other

Of course, this is not a scientific poll, so we cannot conclude that the same percentages would occur had all the millions of Java developers responded to this question. Still, it's remarkable that 83% of the participants in the poll agree that learning Java is worth the time and effort, both for today's college students and for more experienced developers who are looking to add a new language to their professional resume.

Looking at it another way -- 83% of the people who voted believe that Java is going to be viable as a source of income for quite a long time into the future, I'd say at least for the next 15 years or so. You certainly wouldn't advise another developer or someone in college to learn something that was going to disappear, as the foundation of a job or consulting work, any time soon.

In this, I agree with the 83%. Java's installed base is so enormous that there should be plenty of work for Java developers in the next decade or two. And, the language and JVM continue to be extended in important directions that reflect emerging requirements to solve problems that exist today that did not exist 15-20 years ago. A language that is growing and adapting to a mutating set of problems has a bright future, in my opinion; and this is especially so if the functional growth and adaptation is occuring in a language with a large installed code base, and millions of active developers. What language is a V.P. of Development or CTO going to select for a big new project? The latest fad? I doubt it.

Not everyone agreed that it's worthwhile to learn Java, though. More than 10% of the voters would advise college students and other developers against learning Java at this time, with 7% citing recent events as the reason. Another 4% gave learning Java a solid "Maybe" rating.

54% would recommend learning Java, but advise against knowing only Java. Here, we can't really know if the advice is just common sense hedging (who can know the future, so don't "put all your eggs in the same basket"), or if it reflects on Java's current state.

Anyway, I'd like to thank Alexander Romanenko for suggesting this poll to me. It was a good one!

New poll: Java's best days are...

Our new poll continues the recent theme of asking where people think Java stands today. The poll asks you to complete the sentenceJava's best days are... -- with the options being "Ahead of it," "Right now," or "Behind it" (or "I don't know"). Voting will be open for the next week.

If you have an idea for a java.net poll, please contact me. I'm always interested in putting a wide variety of questions to our java.net community.


Java Today

Dustin Marx works on Detecting Class Innards in Groovy:

When using a new language or using new features of a language that I have not used before, I like to know what fields and methods are supported by various classes and objects in that language. This has certainly been the case as I have learned and used Groovy. In this post, I look at the many ways one can find out what a Groovy class/object has to offer...

Geertjan Wielenga reviews the Refactored NetBeans Platform Samples for 7.0:

The two key samples for the NetBeans Platform, the Feed Reader application (by Rich Unger) and the Paint application (by Tim Boudreau) have been refactored and the updates are already available in the latest development builds. In both cases, the new TopComponent annotations and Action annotations are used, meaning that the WSTCREF files, setting files, and related layer entries have been removed. In the case of the Feed Reader...

Markus Eisele is investigating QR-Codes with GlassFish and PrimeFaces:

I've been playing around with QR-Codes lately. To make it short. I love them. If you have a nice, little reader on your mobile you have a very handy way of getting contacts, urls, email adresses, and short texts into your mobile. If you look around, you can find a lot of websites offering to create such stuff for you. One of the most prominent are the Google Chart Tools...

In the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announces that Weld Extensions is now Seam Solder and soon GlassFish-friendly:

Seam Solder is the new name for Weld Extensions and is a set of portable extensions for CDI and Java EE 6. Following the release of JBoss 6, several people asked about the status of Weld and Seam. Weld is the CDI reference implementation and Seam is a JBoss-sponsored community effort to build modular extensions for Java EE 6. Seam targets standard Java EE runtimes and other environments where CDI is integrated...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Podcast 12: Adam Bien -

Interview with Adam Bien, Java Champion, consultant, lecturer, speaker, software architect, developer, and author of Java books, on just about everything related to Java. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel is Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE evangelist...

We're also featuring Arun Gupta's entry on the "Stories" blog,CEJUG - Manage your JUGs using GlassFish:

Typically the JUG members are identified by subscribers on a mailing list. This however does not provide enough information about the members to the JUG leaders. The Cear

While the HotSpot JVM provides developers with a powerful set of JVM options, the documentation that's provided for the options is, in the words of Zahid Qureshi, "criminally short and non-comprehensive." However, Zahid isn't one to simply complain and walk away. Instead, he took the time to thoroughly investigate the HotSpot JVM options, and he presents the results of his study and analysis in his recent blog post, "Inspecting HotSpot JVM Options."

Zahid notes that

The JVM options themselves can be controlled in a number of ways:

  • via the command line on JVM startup.
  • via JMX for certain options where this is allowed.
  • indirectly via the command line by a super-option which then sets other options.
  • automatically by the JVM. The JVM has ergonomic capability to detect features of the host and set options accordingly.

Using the first two methods we are explicitly setting options ourselves and can easily track what value each option has (true,false,20,100etc).

Zahid goes on to describe and demonstrate the key options, talks about client versus server JVM analysis, and investigates the "super-option" -XX:+AggressiveOpts, before concluding:

There is enormous scope for coarse and fine grained control of JVM behaviour. The option-XX:+PrintFlagsFinal allows comprehensive reporting of the options and their values. The available options vary by build and JVM type (server or client). Recording and auditing this output is an important step in any Java benchmarking or continuous monitoring exercise. Oracle can surreptitiously enable options in new Java builds which may cause inexplicable changes in performance and behaviour of existing applications.

As Dustin Marx said in a recent blog post:

Inspecting HotSpot JVM Options is a great post for those wishing to understand better the options provided by Oracle's (formerly Sun's) HotSpot Java Virtual Machine.

Java Today

On the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announces One more move : docs.sun.com -

The entire docs.sun.com content is being moved to Oracle systems (download.oracle.com) before it is eventually shut down. This is another consolidation move to standardize on Oracle practices and systems and remove any duplication. The content on docs.sun.com (DSC) was converted in December to the new format and has now been republished to the new home (full index still under construction, Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 documentation is here)...

Stephen Chin discusses Visage Android

A plurality of voters in last week's poll considered the completion of Oracle's acquisition of Sun Microsystems the most significant Java-related news of 2010. But other news items also attracted considerable numbers of votes; and news that was not among the poll options was also posted in the comments section.

A total of 269 votes were cast, and three comments were posted. The exact question and results were:

What was the most significant Java-related news in 2010?

  • 32% (87 votes) - The completion of Oracle's acquisition of Sun
  • 16% (44 votes) - The new Java 7 / Java 8 plan
  • 16% (43 votes) - IBM and Oracle joint commitment to OpenJDK
  • 4% (12 votes) - The release of Java EE 6
  • 15% (41 votes) - The growth of Scala and other new JVM languages
  • 8% (22 votes) - Other
  • 7% (20 votes) - I don't know

While a third of the voters considered the completion of the Sun acquisition to be the most significant Java-related news of 2010, about a sixth of the voters considered each of three other stories most significant: the new Java 7 / Java 8 plan; IBM and Oracle joint commitment to OpenJDK; and the growth of Scala and other new JVM languages.

A considerable 8% of the voters didn't think the most significant news of 2010 was captured by the poll choices. Bothgeorgm and jkeatley consider Oracle's lawsuit against Google to be the most significant story. Meanwhile,aleixmr cited the continuing neglect of the client side as being a significant (and unfortunate) highlight of 2010 as a whole.

New poll: do you recommend learning Java?

Our new poll was suggested by Alexander Romanenko, who is considering undertaking the substantial effort that's required to add Java to his professional programming repertoire. However, Alexander has concerns about Java's future, due to recent events, and to the pessimism and angst that is so widely expressed regarding those events.

So, on Alexander's behalf, our new poll asks "Would you recommend learning Java to today's college students and developers who want to add to their skill set?" Let him know what you recommend by voting between now and Monday.


Java Today

In the Aquarium, Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine looks ahead to 12 GlassFish Webinars!

With GlassFish 3.1 soon to be released and Java EE 6 still a very popular topic, the GlassFish Webinar Series announced by Pieter has you covered on lots of different topics. That's no less than 12 webinars scheduled before the end of May to cover the Java EE programming model, various tools, what's new in GlassFish 3.1, clustering...

Dustin Marx investigates HotSpot in HotSpot JVM Options Displayed: -XX:+PrintFlagsInitial and -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -

Inspecting HotSpot JVM Options is a great post for those wishing to understand better the options provided by Oracle's (formerly Sun's) HotSpot Java Virtual Machine. In this thorough post, Zahid Qureshi discusses how to use the option-XX:+PrintFlagsFinal in conjunction with-XX:+UnlockDiagnosticVMOptions to "dump out every JVM option and its value." Zahid goes further than this and runs these flags against the HotSpot JVM in both client (his client output here) and server mode...

Ludovic Poitou talks about Multiple Directory Administrative Users:

Most of LDAP directory servers configure a single well known directory administrative account (cn=Directory Manager [,dc=example,dc=com]) which has full access to everything. While there is a need to have one special user to bootstrap the server, we are too often seeing that special account being used by all applications that have specific administrative needs : the provisioning application, the email management application...

Fabrizio Chami presents an Android Proximity Alerts Tutorial:

Smart-phones are taking over the mobile world, this is a fact. Since GPS devices are usually found embedded in those phones, there is already a notable rise in applications that take advantage of the offered geographical positioning functionality. A type of those applications is the one of Location Based Services, where the service exploits knowledge about where the mobile user is globally positioned at. Pretty common are also...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Arun Gupta's entry on the "Stories" blog, CEJUG - Manage your JUGs using GlassFish:

Typically the JUG members are identified by subscribers on a mailing list. This however does not provide enough information about the members to the JUG leaders. The Cear

On Friday, Harold Ogle of the JCP announced new activity in JSR 302 (Safety Critical JavaTM Technology) and JSR 315 (JavaTM Servlet 3.0 Specification). The blog post "JSR 302: Early Draft Review - Safety Critical Java Technology"announces that the JSR 302 Expert Group:

has published a draft specification for Early Draft Review (also removing the Inactive status flag). The review is scheduled to close on 7 April 2011.

Another blog post, "JSR 315 Maintenance Review: Java Servlet 3.0 Specification", announces that the JSR 315 Maintenance Lead:

has posted an updated Change Log for Maintenance Review. The Maintenance Review is here: http://jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/maintenance/jsr315/index.html... This review closes on 6 February 2011.

Java Today

In just over a week, Adam Bien will be Bringing Some Java EE to the Vampires:

The JUG with the cool logo [Transylvania Java User Group] invited me about two years ago for a speaking event. I will spent the whole week in Rumania with Java EE 5, so I need some fun with Java EE 6 after work :-). 18.01.2010: I will introduce you to the world of Java EE 6 with nothing but code, implementing an application interactively; 19.01.2010: The day after I would like to discuss some Java EE 6 Patterns, Anti-Patterns, Strange Approaches and Best Practices...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine provides An update on GlassFish 3.1:

There might have been some confusion recently around the availability of GlassFish 3.1 in final version (GA/RTM/FCS, pick your favorite acronym). While the original roadmap from March 2010mentioned late 2010, the JavaOne keynote in September 2010 mentioned two GlassFish releases in 2011. So here is the update :GlassFish 3.1 Open Source Edition is scheduled to ship in February...

Geertjan Wielenga follows up on European Radar Software in Java on the NetBeans Platform:

Work done for the French Ministry of Defence on the NetBeans Platform was mentioned here in this blog less than a year ago. I've been trying to follow that project, ASTRAD ("architecture and simulation tool for radar analysis and design"), ever since then. I came across several articles recently relating to this project. One of them, entitled "Use of ASTRAD Simulation Tool in Radar modes development", describes ASTRAD in quite some detail. In it, ASTRAD is defined as "a graphical integrated environment for radar simulation developments"...

R. Tyler Croy, of Hudson Labs, announces that Installing plugins has always been easy, now it's fast too!-

As one of the "men behind the scenes" of the Hudson project, a lot of my contributions tend to be in writing articles or handling infrastructure, anything to ensure folks like Kohsuke can continue to make Hudson great without being distracted by inane system administration tasks. This past week, one of my long-running infrastructure projects has finally "gone live," making downloads of plugins and packages faster than ever! ...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the new Java EE 6 article by Java Champion Adam Bien, Simplicity by Design:

The introduction of Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 5, in 2006, did a lot to simplify enterprise application development. Java EE 6, released in 2009, simplifies design and architecture tasks even further. Java EE 6 is a good choice for building small situational applications quickly and without any overhead...

We're also featuring Micha Kops' latest article, Enterprise Java Bean / EJB 3.1 Testing using Maven and embedded Glassfish:

Are you playing around with the shiny new 3.1 EJBs? Using Maven for your Java projects? Need an easy way to write and execute tests for your EJBs that depends on an Java Application Server? No problem using Maven Archetypes, the Maven EJB Plugin and the GlassFish embedded Application Container...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What was the most significant Java-related news in 2010? Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

If the voting in last week's java.net poll are indicative of what the broader Java developer community is thinking (the poll, of course, is not scientific), then the events of 2010 didn't ally much of the concern developers have regarding Java's future. A total of 339 votes were cast, and 5 comments, expressing a variety of views, were posted. Here's the exact poll question and results:

Are you more optimistic today about Java's future than you were a year ago?

  • 23% (77 votes) - Yes
  • 14% (47 votes) - Somewhat, at least there's less uncertainty now
  • 23% (79 votes) - Not really, I still have concerns
  • 35% (120 votes) - To the contrary, I'm more pessimistic now
  • 4% (14 votes) - I don't know
  • 1% (2 votes) - Other

With more than a third of the voters saying they're more pessimistic than they were a year ago, and almost a quarter saying they still have concerns, a clear majority is expressing dissatisfaction with the events and/or direction they're seeing. We could observe that 37% of the voters stated that they are at least somewhat more optimistic than a year ago, while only 35% are more pessimistic. But that large "Not really, I still have concerns" group looms ominously, in my view.

Consider where we were a year ago: silence about the future was legally imposed on both Sun and Oracle, due to the laws of corporate mergers. Sun had laid off many people, and many more were leaving ahead of the finalization of the acquisition. Rumors abounded regarding what Oracle's approach was going to be -- could Oracle possibly understand the Java community and open source projects?

Today, there is much greater clarity about Java's direction and Oracle's intentions. Normally, clarity brings at least some optimism, or at least grudging acceptance of the new reality. But these poll results don't reflect that today's greater certainty is inspiring optimism about the future. And based on the ongoing public debates, and recent actions of some groups/companies aside from Oracle, it's clear that there is a lot of dissatisfaction out there.

Still, from my point of view, there are also a lot of positives. I ask people to consider some of these in the current java.net poll, which asks "What was the most significant Java-related news in 2010?" That poll will be open until this coming Monday.

What people thought five years ago

While thinking about last week's poll, I searched the java.net poll archives, looking for a poll that captured people's views about Java's future in years past. And I found one. The poll ran in late April and early May of 2005, almost five years ago. Voters responded to the statement Java's "best days" are... 55% of the voters said Java's best days are "Ahead of it"; 29% said Java's best days are "Right now"; and 15% said Java's best days are "Behind it."

I wonder what people would say now. My guess is that the results would be quite different. I think I may re-try this poll (or something similar) next week, to find out.

I also plan to write more about both the poll from 2005 and last week's poll -- analyzing the comments in particular, since both polls produced interesting expressions of people's attitudes toward Java at that specific point in time. I'll probably do that in my next blog, after I reread both sets of comments and give them some more thought.

As always, if you have an idea for a poll, contact me. I'm happy to make the java.net polling facility a tool that's open to the entire Java/JVM community...


Java Today

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine celebrates the news that JBoss joins the Java EE 6 parade:

Almost two years after shipping their Java EE 5 product and a year after the release of Java EE 6, RedHat has now released JBoss 6.0, a Java EE 6 Web Profile product. Congratulations to the team at JBoss on this community release! ...

Arun Gupta asks Which Java EE 6 App Server ? - JBoss 6.0 or GlassFish 3.x:

It's been over a year that Java EE 6 was released in Dec 2009 along with GlassFish as the Reference Implementation. JBoss contributed two new specifications to the Java EE 6 platform - JSR 299 (Contexts & Dependency Injection) and JSR 303 (Bean Validation) and contributed in multitude of other ways to make the platform successful, many thanks for that. RedHat released JBoss 6.0...

Jean-Francois Arcand talks about Going Asynchronous using AsyncHttpClient: The Complex -

The Async Http Client library purpose is to allow Java applications to easily execute HTTP requests and asynchronously process the HTTP responses. In this second part on the topic, I will describe more complex operations that can be done with the AsyncHttpClient like resumable download, zero in memory bytes copy, oAuth calculation, optimal transfer listener and performance tricks...

Geertjan Wielenga announces that we can now Debug Multiple PDF Documents in iText RUPS for NetBeans IDE:

I updated the iText RUPS plugin for NetBeans IDE considerably. Rather than using Window | Debug PDF, which opens a single window in which one PDF document can be debugged at a time, you now use Window | Favorites and then right-click a PDF document in the Favorites window to open the RUPS window...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the new Java EE 6 article by Java Champion Adam Bien, Simplicity by Design:

The introduction of Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 5, in 2006, did a lot to simplify enterprise application development. Java EE 6, released in 2009, simplifies design and architecture tasks even further. Java EE 6 is a good choice for building small situational applications quickly and without any overhead...

We're also featuring Micha Kops' latest article, Enterprise Java Bean / EJB 3.1 Testing using Maven and embedded Glassfish:

Are you playing around with the shiny new 3.1 EJBs? Using Maven for your Java projects? Need an easy way to write and execute tests for your EJBs that depends on an Java Application Server? No problem using Maven Archetypes, the Maven EJB Plugin and the GlassFish embedded Application Container...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What was the most significant Java-related news in 2010? Voting will be open until Monday.


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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

http://a1.twimg.com/profile_images/68644753/joshua_marinacci_normal.jpgJosh Marinacci has announced that a new version of Leonardo Sketch is now available: Ruby Red Remixed. Leonardo is:

an open source vector drawing program named after the 15th century painter, but aimed for the 21st century user. It focuses on common tasks like mockups, prototyping, quick vector sketches, and presentations with a clean and consistent user interface. Leo is designed to be augmented by internet webservices and plugins created in several scripting languages.

Ruby Red Remixed is an interim release along the path to the next major Leonardo release, Glowing Green. The release was pushed out to make the recent progress on the Leonardo platform available to the community, within the context of a formal, stable version. Ruby Red Revisited includes "tons of bug fixes," as well as many significant new features.

Key new features include:

  • Infinite Canvas: The canvas will automatically grow as you add new objects to your drawing, even if they are beyond the edges of the document. Never run out of space again.
  • Draggable guidelines: create guidelines by dragging them out from the ruler. Objects will snap to them automatically.
  • Flickr upload support: Now you can upload your creations directly to Flickr as well as Twitter.
  • Improved SVG Import: Lots of Illustrator symbols can be imported now by exporting them as SVG from Illustrator.
  • New Rectangle UI: set rectangle corner radius and gradients directly with handles instead of with a palette. Much easier to use.
  • Improved translations, including Japanese. Edit or create new translations easily using the debug menu in the preferences.

http://leonardosketch.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/rubyredLeonardoScreenSnapz008.png

See Ruby Red Remixed for more details on the latest release, and visit theLeonardo Sketch home page for additional information about Leonardo, the underpinning Amino library, and more.


Java Today

JUG Chennai (India) celebrated the New Year with Java User Group - Chennai JUGChennai Unconference meet, 1st January 2011 at Adams Studio India:

Agenda: JVM Langauges

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