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The Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release came out a few weeks ago. The development team was hopeful that people would download and test the release on their favorite apps, and try out some of the new features. Our current java.net poll asks if you chose to do so.

Specifically, the poll asks: To what extent have you worked with the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release? The poll went live this past Monday, and it will stay active until this coming Monday, April 4. If you haven't voted yet, consider doing so!

Last poll: bugs.sun.com web site

Our previous poll was suggested by java.net usercowwoc. The poll asked about the responsiveness and ease of use of the bugs.sun.comweb site. 35 votes were cast, and one comment was posted. Here are the results:

How would you rate the responsiveness and ease-of-use of the bugs.sun.com website?

  • 9% (3 votes) - Excellent
  • 26% (9 votes) - Good
  • 20% (7 votes) - Poor
  • 23% (8 votes) - Unacceptable
  • 0% (0 votes) - Other
  • 23% (8 votes) - I don't know

That's certainly not a ringing vote of approval regarding bugs.sun.com. The comment posted by larsstitz casts an even darker cloud:

I am actually wondering about the results of this poll, since I was complete unable to log on to bugs.sun.com for two months now. After submitting the login credentials, the server does not reply and the connection times out...

After perusing the site today, I'm not entirely sure that bugs.sun.com is even intended to be active. When I click on the Recently Closed Bugs link, the page I get says:

This is a list of bugs that received the highest number of votes and were closed within the last six months.

But when I click on the bug at the top of the list (4670071), the detail implies the bug may have been closed in late 2008 or early 2009. This, of course, was prior to the announcement that Oracle was going to be acquiring Sun, so maybe the site isn't fully maintained anymore. Meanwhile, the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release page directs you to http://bugreport.sun.com/ if you want to report bugs in that release.

So, there's something of a lack of clarity regarding reporting bugs to sun.com domains, at this point. But, you clearly should usehttp://bugreport.sun.com/for reporting Java SE 7 bugs...

And if you haven't voted in this week's java.net poll on the recent Java SE 7 preview release, please consider doing so! As I said, the poll will close sometime this coming Monday.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Manfred Reim posted a new java.net blog, JavaEE 7 JSR approved:

  • The JavaEE 7 umbrella JSR has been approved. A step in the right direction. Now we'll just have to see what is going to be included for real :)

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks To what extent have you worked with the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release? Voting will be open until this coming Monday.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight NetBeans IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1:

NetBeans IDE 7.0 introduces language support for development to the Java SE 7 specification with the JDK 7 platform. The release also provides enhanced integration with the Oracle WebLogic server, as well as support for Oracle Database and GlassFish 3.1. Additional highlights include Maven 3 and HTML5 editing support...

We're also still featuring Eric S Chan's new article, OpenICOM: A JPA Framework for Integrated Collaboration Environments, Part 1 -

This article is the first part of the three parts series to present a new project http://java.net/projects/open-icomin java.net to incubate a JPA framework for developing integrated collaboration environments. The first part explains the advantages of the JPA programming model, which embodies the design patterns that are well-suited for managing...

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

I've been in contact with quite a few people recently regarding upcoming conferences (see the java.net Events Calendar for near-term events). There are major conferences and events that will take place in the next few months around the world.

It seems to me that, in terms of conferences, Java is spreading out across the world, compared with what was the case just a few years ago. We no longer have just one big annual conference in North America (JavaOne, obviously) and one big annual conference in Europe (DEVOXX, I think, has filled that role in recent years). These haven't gone away, of course; but they are now joined by many smaller conferences, summits, etc. And these smaller conferences seem to be on a strong upward growth path. For example, Jfokus was the venue selected for announcing Java Champions Rickard

A few weeks ago I attended a Java-centric OTN Developer Day in Boston, MA (US). As I said in my initial blog about this, I found the sessions very interesting and took lots of notes.

I hadn't really thought much about the relationships between Java SE, the OpenJDK project, and the JCP in the past. Or, perhaps it's more correct to say that I had some vague notions, but had never taken the time to think about what the actual relationships might be.

Danny Coward, at the start of his presentation ("Java SE: The Road Forward, 2011 Edition"), clarified the situation, and showed that there really is a distinct separation between Java SE, OpenJDK, and the JCP. Here's what he said.

Java SE is a software platform. It consists of a set of documentation, prescribed implementations, Technology Compatibility Kits(TCK), etc. In other words, it's primarily a bunch of paper, all produced by the JCP. You can't use Java SE in itself, because what it really is is a description of a language platform; it exists prior to, or above, an actual language implementation.

Given this starting point, it becomes clear what theOpenJDK project is: it's an implementation of the Java SE platform -- specifically, Oracle's implementation (with recently growing participation from big companies like IBM, Apple, RedHat). So, if you look at OpenJDK, will you see a one-to-one correspondance between line items in the Java SE documentation and implementations within the OpenJDK? You'd certainly better! But, that's just the starting point for the OpenJDK project. Beyond implementing the specific requirements laid out in Java SE, the OpenJDK project includes many additional features, including tools, deployment capabilities, etc.

It's a bit like Linux distributions, where a single kernal is packaged in many different ways with many different added features, by different development teams. Except that Java SE would really be the description or definition of a kernel, not an actual downloadable software package.

An interesting point Danny made: the Java SE platform doesn't specify or require garbage collection. That's an addition that has been engineered in the various implementations. In other words, you could create a Java implementation that has no garbage collector and it could still be a valid Java SE implementation.

More to come...


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, lots of other people have posted significant java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks How would you rate the responsiveness and ease-of-use of the bugs.sun.com website? Voting ends Monday.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Eric S Chan's new article, OpenICOM: A JPA Framework for Integrated Collaboration Environments, Part 1 -

This article is the first part of the three parts series to present a new project http://java.net/projects/open-icomin java.net to incubate a JPA framework for developing integrated collaboration environments. The first part explains the advantages of the JPA programming model, which embodies the design patterns that are well-suited for managing...

We're also still featuring Adam Bateman's JDK 7 nearing the endgame -

Just a reminder that JDK 7 is nearing the endgame and now is the right time to grab the latest JDK 7 build and give it a test drive. Once it goes beyond the end of March then the release will start to get locked down and it will get harder to get fixes or changes in (don't leave it too late). The important thing is to make sure that your existing code works well...

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.

Dustin Marx investigates JDK 7 JMX Platform Management Beans: A First Peek -

One of the new featuresanticipated for JDK 7 is advertised in the Java SE 7 previewas Enhanced JMX Agent and MBeans. In this post, I look at portions of the enhanced JMXand MXBean support. Specifically, I briefly cover new-to-JDK7 PlatformManagedObject interface and ManagementFactory.getAllPlatformMXBeanInterfaces()method...

Joe Darcy reports on Project Coin EclipseCon 2011:

This afternoon at EclipseCon I gave a talk on Project Coin: Small Language Changes in JDK 7; the slides have been posted. An earlier talk at the conference gave a demo of the current Eclipse support for the Project Coin features; my talk included a demo of the "quick fix" hints to introduce Coin features in code provided by NetBeans 7.0 Beta 2.

Geertjan Wielenga talks about Serbian Students in Belgrade & The NetBeans Platform

In Belgrade, at the Serbian NetBeans Platform Training 2011, I tried out the panorama photo thingy on my new Android and it kind of works quite well... Zoran Sevarac, the Neuroph developer, also showed off the image recognition feature in Neuroph Studio (yet another NetBeans Platform application)...

Shai Almog talks about LWUIT List Rendering: The Easy Way. Generic List Cell Renderer:

LWUIT is really powerful and flexible, we took the power and flexibility of Swing and went even further (styles, painters) and one such power is the cell renderer. This is a concept we derived from Swing which is both remarkably powerful and pretty hard for newbies to figure out, frankly its pretty hard for everyone... As part of the GUI builder work we needed a way to customize rendering for a List...

Just published - Java Spotlight Episode 22: Steve Harris - Senior VP of Application Server Development on Java EE 7:

Interview with Steve Harris, Senior VP of Application Server Development at Oracle on the Java EE 7. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Dalibor Topic, Java Free and Open Source Software Ambassador, and Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE Developer Advocate...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine announces that Grizzly 2.0 is here! -

With the release of GlassFish 3.1 and the new Java EE 7 JSRs being filed, it was easy to miss other announcements such as the release of Grizzly 2.0. Grizzly 2.0 features many brand new APIs (it's called 2.0 for a reason!), updated WebSockets & Comet and documentation (start with the Getting Started)...

Geertjan Wielenga talks about Fighting Hunger & Poverty via Java with the NetBeans Platform:

The training in Mexico at CIMMYT, which is near Mexico City, has come to an end and here is the inevitable group pic... In the front row you see, holding a NetBeans Platform certificate, Tito who leads the development of some NetBeans Platform work at CIMMYT, with on his left Hector who is the instructor of the group. Students from the Philippines and one from Denmark...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine catalogs the GlassFish 3.1 Screencasts (so far):

One new thing we tried for the release of GlassFish 3.1 was to do not only blogs (see coverage), but also screencasts done mostly by the engineers themselves but also from product managers. Screencasts are not easy to produce - they take time and the result is not always what you had hoped for (technical issues, length, scenario not well thought out) but I have to say...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The latest two java.net polls ask developers about the Java language enhancements that are part of Java 7 (the Java SE 7 Developer Preview is available for download now; the formal release will come in just a few months). Last week's poll asked What's the most important Java 7 enhancement for the work you do? The majority voted for Project Coin (JSR 334). As a result, the current poll follows up on that theme, asking Which Project Coin (JSR 334) Java language enhancement will be most useful? Voting will be open only until Monday, so now is the time to vote if you haven't already.

58 votes were cast in last week's poll, and two comments were posted. Here are the results:

What's the most important Java 7 enhancement for the work you do?

  • 60% (35 votes) - Project Coin (JSR 334)
  • 14% (8 votes) - InvokeDynamic (JSR 292)
  • 9% (5 votes) - Lightweight Fork/Join Framework (JSR 166y)
  • 9% (5 votes) - More New I/O (JSR 203)
  • 5% (3 votes) - A different Java 7 enhancement
  • 3% (2 votes) - I don't know
  • 0% (0 votes) - Other

The result is pretty clear cut -- though the sample size (58 total votes) is pretty small. Nonetheless, I think the clear majority voting for Project Coin is a testament to the careful selection of upgrades that are actually implemented within Project Coin. The community is saying that, right off, the Project Coin enhancements will be useful for the work they do every day.

This view is backed up by prunge's comment:

I picked coin because I'll use it more in day-to-day tasks than the other features. But the NIO filesystem additions will actually allow me to do things in Java that I couldn't do before without native code/hacks.

osbald expressed a different view:

Voted different as I'd be most interested in the odd speed tweaks that've gone into the v7 JVM ..oh and its basis on OpenJDK. InvokeDynamic I might use indirectly via Groovy/JRuby but in my daily coding rotines? can't see myself using it. Small coin dosent exactly trill me either, for the most part the syntax 'enhancements' don't seem worth sacrificing backwards compatibility with Java 6.

Having been around the world of code for a few decades, I can certainly see osbald's point in questioning the wisdom of losing backward compatibility. I mean -- in my view, Java is becoming akin to historic languages like COBOL, Fortran, and C, in terms of its installed, completely-validated code base. I spoke with a developer last night who works on business applications that are based on COBOL accounting code written decades ago. Now, no one's developing big new apps in COBOL today (I thinkthat's a true statement, anyway). So, in that way, Java's entirely different.

But, if you look at Fortran, and especially C -- new code is still being written in those languages. I think it's quite possible that 30 years from now, code written in COBOL, Fortran, C, and Java that hasn't been edited for decades will still be running within many operational environments.

It's a difficult decision -- Java is young enough that you want it to grow such that it remains competitive with newer languages; yet, at the same time, the installed base of Java code is already enormous, despite the language's relative (to COBOL, Fortran, C, for example) youth. So, you need to be very careful not to "break" the old installed code base.

Anyway -- the current poll is about Project Coin itself (which specific enhancement is most useful?); voting ends on Monday.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, quite a few people have posted significant blogs on java.net:


Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Tori Wieldt reports on TheServerSide Java Symposium panel discussion, The Java Community Process: What's Broken and How to Fix It-

In a panel discussion today at TheServerSide Java Symposium, Patrick Curran, Head of the Java Community Process, James Gosling, and ?Reza Rahman, member, Java EE 6 and EJB 3.1 expert groups, discussed the state of the JCP. Moderated by Cameron McKenzie, Editor of TheServerSide.com, they discussed what's wrong with JCP and ways to fix it...

Shai Almog's latest LWUIT post is Constantly Theme'd:

One of the often requested features in LWUIT's themes has been the addition of constants for themes. Constants allow the theme designer to "hint" of desired functionality to the application code, e.g. a particular theme might have a constant indicating that it wants the scrollbar to fadeout when unused. The LWUIT resource editor now includes an additional tab for creating such constants...

The Brussels JUG presents Leo Exter's Bootstrapping: Probably the most important term a startup entrepreneur should know -

To my surprise, a lot of startups I come across aren

I received an email a few days ago about this year's Open Source Convention (OSCON), and was surprised to see some new additions to this year's conference: theOSCON Data and OSCON Javaco-conferences!

I only attended OSCON once -- back in 2008 when, working with O'Reilly and Intel, I participated as editor/blogger for the new ThreadingBuildingBlocksopen source project -- but even based on that one experience, I can say that OSCON is a great developer-centric conference. I expect that OSCON Java will have much the same feel.

The conference takes place in Portland, OR (US), from Monday to Wednesday, July 25-27. OSCON Java and OSCON Data will be co-located with the broader OSCON conference. The Call for Participation is happening right now. In fact, the deadline is looming (March 21 at 11:59 PM Pacific Daily Time).

The conference will include 40-minute presentations and 90-minute workshops. Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Server-side Java technologies
  • Java web frameworks
  • Emerging JVM languages
  • Open source Java tools
  • Rich client technologies
  • Cloud technologies
  • Mobile development

If you'd like to present, submit a proposal within the next week. Proposers will be notified on whether their proposals have been accepted by early April.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Cay Horstmann published a new java.net blog titled A Blog Uploading Tool for java.net:

In this blog, I address my grief with blog uploading, following Paul Graham's advice about choosing technology. Someone just complained on the java.net bloggers list about the wretched online blogging tool. Indeed, I couldn't imagine actually authoring in that thing. Instead, I paste in my HTML code, upload the images, and curse when I have to adjust the image URLs. Clearly, this is...

[Ed. Note: the java.net infrastructure team is working on repairing/enhancing the java.net blogging facility, which took some hits in the aftermath of our recent site upgrade/migration. I'm really hopeful that things will be working much better before long!]


Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Michael Kopp discusses Major GCs

Two weeks ago, the Java SE 7 Developer Preview was released. This release is feature-complete, stable, and ready for testing. As Mark Reinhold noted, the Java 7 team is seeking input from the Java community regarding the Developer Preview release.

While the release has been well-exercised by the development team, exposing it to the much broader world of global Java apps is sure to point out some flaws, unanticipated idiosyncracies, or development oversights. Finding these, so they can be dealt with as appropriate long before the formal release of Java 7 (probably in July), is a high priority. Mark puts it this way:

If you’ve been watching JDK 7 development from the sidelines then now is a great time to download a build and take it for a spin. See if your favorite project still compiles and runs, see if it runs any faster than before, or try out one of the manynew features.

Let us know what you think The sooner, the better. We’ll do our best to read, evaluate, and act on all feedback received in the forums or via the usual bug-reporting channelbetween now and the end of March. After that we’ll gradually ramp down the rate of change in order to stabilize the code, so bugs reported later on might not get fixed in time for the initial release.

There are really two aspects to helping out with testing Java 7. The first, which Mark alludes to above, is seeing how existing apps perform under Java 7. That is, is Java 7 backward-compatible in all the expected ways? And, does it deliver performance improvements for existing apps?

In addition, there are the new Java 7 features. These have been talked about a lot. Our current java.net poll, in fact, is about some of the key Java 7 enhancements. In the poll, you select which enhancement is most important for your work. By downloading the Developer Preview, you can get a jump start on trying out some of those new features, and really see how they're going to work out for you. Updated documentation is available.

The fact is: not that many bugs have been filed against the Developer Preview Release thus far. It would be especially beneficial for all of us to ensure that any backward-compatibility related problems are detected now, rather than later.

Another point: what if something new creates an unanticipated performance bottleneck for apps that significantly exercise certain functions within the Java 7 API? Surely it will be very good to discover this now, while there's still time for adjustments to be made to the code.

Anyway, if you'd like to help ensure that Java 7 will be the best it can possibly be when the final edition is released a few months from now, download the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release and give it a workout over the next week or two -- and don't forget to provide the development team with feedback, via theJava SE Snapshots Forum or the bug reports channel.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Shing Wai Chan, Alex Potochkin, and John Ferguson Smart have published new java.net blogs.

Shing Wai-Chan posted keepstate, keepSessions, keep-state, save-sessions-enabled in GlassFish 3.1:

GlassFish supports the preseving of HTTP session data across the redeployment of web application. Prior to GlassFish 3.1, one can achieve this through the command line as follows: asadmin redeploy --properties keepSessions=true --name ${APP_NAME} ${A_WAR} In GlassFish 3.1, web sessions, Stateful Session EJB instances and persistently created EJB timers can be retained between...

Alex Potchkin posted Swing in a better world:

I truly love the Swing GUI toolkit, I enjoy its flexibility, opennes and great abilities. I know that some people say that Swing is too difficult to learn, and I partly accept it because it took me several years working in the Swing team to get the whole picture of the AWT, Java 2D and the Swing itself. The Swing history counts more then 10 years and it is definitely not about end. The new...

and Swing in a better world: java interfaces:

We have all read the "Effective Java" book and know that we should prefer interfaces over abstract classes. This is a known and respected pattern which should be used wherever possible. However the years in the JDK team tauhgt me not to blindly trust to good practices from the world of application programming. A distinctive feature of the JDK is backward compatibility. All programms...

And John Ferguson Smart published Build Pipelines with Jenkins/Hudson:

This article is an extract from the upcoming book Jenkins: The Definitive Guide, to be published in the coming months with O'Reilly.. One of the more interesting plugins to emerge over the last few months is the Build Pipeline plugin, written by the folks at Centrum Systems. The Build Pipelines plugin takes the idea of build promotion further, and helps you design and monitor deployment...

Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine discusses GlassFish 3.1 : auto-upgrade or not to auto-upgrade?

If you have a GlassFish 3.0.1 installation you probably have been notified that you can update this installation to the newly released GlassFish 3.1 using the update center. This will do an In-Place Upgrade with the new bits (some 75MB pulled off of the stable.glassfish.orgrepository for the open source edition for instance)...

Geertjan Wielenga asks if it's possible to Never Restart An App During Development?

The dream is... deploy your app once during development, and only once, then keep it running. Don't close it down, ever. Whenever you make a change, anywhere in the app, just redeploy the module where you made the change and the module is reloaded, with the feature being changed while the app state is maintained...

Adam Bien provides another example of Swing Looks ...Great! - New Theme for Synthetica:

The BlackEye look and feel was already introduced. Synthetica comes with a new theme called "Classy"...

The Java Posse #343 - Newscast for Mar 10th 2011 podcast has been published:

* Dick -> Keynote at DevNexus on 21-22nd o http://www.devnexus.com; * Tor -> Eclipsecon o http://www.eclipsecon.org/2011/; * Java 7 developer builds are now available for download and testing. o http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk7/features/ ...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Episode 20 - Pete St Pierre on SunSPOTs Rev 8:

Interview with Pete St Pierre, Member of Technical Staff working on the Sun SPOT program under Oracle Labs, on the new SunSPOT Rev 8 release that is now available at the Oracle Store. Joining us this week is Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE Developer Advocate...

We're also still featuring Markus Eisele's article, High Performance JPA with GlassFish and Coherence - Part 3:

In this third part of my four part series I'll explain strategy number two of using Coherence with EclipseLink and GlassFish. This is all about using Coherence as Second Level Cache (L2) with EclipseLink. General approach. This approach applies Coherence data grid to JPA applications that rely on database hosted data...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's the most important Java 7 enhancement for the work you do? Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Our new poll originates from the "Java SE - the Road Forward, 2011 Edition" presentation at last week's OTN Java Developer Day in Boston, MA (US). The presentation, given by Danny Coward, highlighted four areas of significant enhancement in Java 7:

  • Project Coin (JSR 334)
  • InvokeDynamic (JSR 292)
  • Lightweight Fork/Join Framework (JSR 166y)
  • More New I/O (JSR 203)

Our new poll provides these as options, and asks What's the most important Java 7 enhancement for the work you do? The poll will be open into this coming Monday.

Last week's poll: initial impression of the new java.net?

Last week's poll, launched immediately after the new java.net infrastructure came online, asked What's your initial impression of the new java.net? I'll admit that I experienced some hesitation in launching the poll before the kinks and performance bottlenecks in the new infrastructure were worked out -- but, I thought that if I waited, then I could no longer really ask for people's "initial" impression.

Predictably, the as-yet-not-fully-tuned system provoked many performance-related initial impressions. Since there wasn't a "slow performance" option among the choices, comments were the only way for people to voice "slowness" as their initial impression, an "option" that a half dozen people took advantage of.

Most of us who have participated in releases of new systems are accustomed to the problems that come to the fore once a system exits test mode and is faced by an actual audience of users. So, let's call the site's first week slowness and other performance problems an initial benchmark, which can be used as a reference at some future time when I run a poll asking something like: "Now that you've gotten used to the new java.net, what are your impressions?"

Other comments concerned layout problems with the site when viewed by Internet Explorer. I know that the infrastructure team was aware of these issues early on, and was working to address them. Also, the fonts prompted many comments.

As for the voting itself: 94 people cast votes, with the following results:

What's your initial impression of the new java.net?

  • 17% (16 votes) - It's much improved
  • 43% (40 votes) - Looks pretty good
  • 15% (14 votes) - I'll have to get used to it before I can say
  • 5% (5 votes) - Seems no better than before
  • 6% (6 votes) - I liked the old site better
  • 14% (13 votes) - Other

From this, and the comments, I conclude that overall the initial view of the new java.net is that it's a step in the right direction -- but the problems (performance, rendition in different browsers, fonts, etc.) need to be resolved. As we'd expect, the team that brought the new site live 10 days ago is indeed focused on addressing the problemmatic issues.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post (March 6), Fabrizio Giudici posted a new blog titled BlueBook (my first Mojo):

Ok, I'm writing a book. But I don't know if I'm really able to write a book: if I look around at people who I know and who wrote a book in the past, I'm really unsure about my skills. But it's not meant as a "regular" book, I mean, something that gets published by an editor. It's just the collection of my design knowledge, in form of a comment to the code that I've written in my many projects,...

Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine looks ahead to JavaOne Russia - Moscow on April 12-13th 2011:

The next JavaOne conference is scheduled for in little over than a month (April 12-13, 2011) in Moscow, Russia, planning is well on its way and I'm happy to report that I'll be presenting a number of sessions there. JavaOne Keynote speakers are none other than Steve Harris (Senior VP of Application Server Development) and Henrik Stahl (Senior Director of Product Management)...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine presents GlassFish Embedded Server: a blog, a screencast and a doc -

GlassFish Embedded (i.e. drive GlassFish from an API) was enhanced as part of the 3.1 release to improve the fidelity with the non-embedded case. Popular use-cases include testing but also embedding the GlassFish runtime as part of an application for easier administration-less deployments. If you're interested in the topic...

Dustin Marx discusses Better JDBC With Groovy Sql:

I don't mind using JDBCdirectly in many of the Java applications I work with, especially when using it in conjunction with Spring's JDBC support or with a simple SQL mapping framework like MyBatis. Groovy makes using JDBC particularly pleasant. I appreciate the combination of powerful flexibility of direct SQL with the ease and convenience of Groovy's treatment of JDBC...

Arun Gupta provides an OTN Developer Day Boston 2011 - Slides & Trip Report:

OTN Developer Day Boston concluded last week with about 70 developers/architects/consultant attending 20 sessions in 4 tracks (Server, Desktop, Java SE Platform, Mobile & Embedded). I delivered 2 technical sessions + 2 hands-on labs. The first session explained the value proposition of Java EE 6 and the key themes of ease-of-use, simplicity, and extensiblity...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Markus Eisele's article, High Performance JPA with GlassFish and Coherence - Part 3:

In this third part of my four part series I'll explain strategy number two of using Coherence with EclipseLink and GlassFish. This is all about using Coherence as Second Level Cache (L2) with EclipseLink. General approach. This approach applies Coherence data grid to JPA applications that rely on database hosted data...

We're also still featuring Mark Reinhold's announcement on theJDK 7 Developer Preview:

The JDK 7 Developer Preview (a.k.a. Milestone 12) builds are now available for download. This milestone is intended for broad testing by developers, deployers, and end users. We’ve run all tests on all supported platforms and haven’t found any glaring issues. We’ve also fixed 456 bugs since reaching the Feature-Complete milestone back in January...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What's the most important Java 7 enhancement for the work you do? Voting will be open until Monday.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

This week I'm featuring news from the Columbia Maryland JUG, the LA JUG, the London Java Community, the Silicon Valley Web JUG, and Java User Group Latvia.

First and foremost, the Columbia, Maryland (US) JUG is looking for a speaker/presenter for their next meeting. JUG leader Edward Moffatt says:

Folks, I'm trying to find someone to speak at the next Columbia, Maryland Java User Group. The next meeting is scheduled for 24 March. Our user group is sponsored by Pangia Technologies in Fulton, Maryland. Just about any topic related to Java is open for presentation/discussion. Some of our meetings have covered topics such as Spring, Hibernate, Annotations, Eclipse IDE, GWT...

Columbia, MD is located in the Baltimore / Washington, DC corridor, to the southwest of Baltimore. Contact Edward if you're interested in speaking.

The LA (Los Angeles, California, US) JUG has made the presentation from their February meeting available. The presentation, by Azul Senior Product Manager Eva Andreasson, is titled What's Inside a JVM. Eva:

provides insights into the inner workings of a Java Virtual Machine and some drill down on what compilers and garbage collectors do, so that you don

This morning I got up much earlier than usual, because I wanted to get to the OTN Java Developer Day in Boston (MA, US) in time to hear the keynote. I ended up spending much more time in my car than I'd hoped -- but the trip was very much worth the effort! I got to see the end of the keynote address, I attended two of the morning sessions, had a quick lunch, then had to run. I took copious notes, which I'll be presenting in a series of upcoming blog posts.

The first session I attended was "Java SE - The road forward, 2011 edition", presented by Danny Coward. This focused on what's in the upcoming Java 7 release, due out in July. Note that you can currently download the Java 7 Developer Preview Release right now. What you get there is everything that will be in the July stable release -- it's just not fully tested and debugged yet. By downloading and working with the Developer Preview Release, you have an opportunity to assist the Java 7 developer team in finding bugs as you familiarize yourself with the new Java 7 features.

The second session I attended was "Visual Development of JavaFX Applications", presented by Sang Shin of JavaPassion.com. This presentation demonstrated some of the key structural features of JavaFX, and demonstrated how to create some basic GUI-centric applications using a graphical JavaFX interface in NetBeans 6.9.1. This showed me how easy it is to create apps using JavaFX, and gave me many ideas for writing some programs that might be useful for the java.net community (while also demonstrating some JavaFX capabilities). I hope I get to develop a few apps in the not-too-distant future.

Lunch was quite tasty! I had caesar salad, brocolli, chicken breast, and nice bread in olive oil. The stuff I didn't eat looked good too.

There were several afternoon sessions I'd have liked to have seen, but I had to leave at the lunch break.

More blogs from me about this event will be coming soon. I sawArun Gupta taking pictures during the keynote, so I expect that he'll be blogging about the event as well; and maybe some more people will blog about it too...


Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Java Spotlight Episode 19 - Patrick Curran, Chair of the Java Community Process (JCP) has been published:

Interview with Patrick Curran, Chair of the Java Community Process (JCP) and director of the JCP's Program Management Office on all things related to the JCP. Sitting in for Terrence this week is Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE Developer Advocate...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine reports More Java EE 7 content: Servlet, EL, JMS and JSF updates -

Following-up on to yesterday's post on JSR 342 (Java EE 7), there are actually four other JSRs that have been filed: * JSR 340: Java Servlet 3.1 Specification; * JSR 341: Expression Language 3.0; * JSR 343: JavaTM Message Service 2.0; * JSR 344: JavaServerTM Faces 2.2...

Terrence Barr reports on embeddedworld 2011: Oracle and Embedded? You bet! -

The amount of traffic and interest at the Oracle booth here at embeddedworld2011 has been nothing short of amazing. At times, the booth was overflowing with visitors, the demos were in high demand, and we

The new java.net went live Monday evening (Americas time). There's a lot that's new, lots of changes. And, a few bugs are still being stomped out. But, still, I'm wondering: What's your initial impression of the new java.net? That's our new poll question.

Voting will be open for the next week.


Java News

Here are the news stories we're currently featuring in our Java news section.

Joe Darcy points out Project Coin: Developer Preview Documentation:

I've posted documentation of the semantics of the Project Coin features as implemented in the JDK 7 developer preview, b130, at: http://cr.openjdk.java.net/~darcy/ProjectCoin/ProjectCoin-Documentation-v0.83.htmlBefore sending in comments or questions about a feature to coin-dev, please read the discussion section after a feature. Many design considerations are discussed in those sections...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine discusses the news that Java EE 7 has been filed as JSR 342:

Taking a little break from the coverage of the GlassFish 3.1 release, here is some important news coming from the JCP front: Java EE 7 has been filed as JSR 342. If you've been tracking this space the main themes should come as no surprise: Cloud, Latest web standards, Modularity, and Ease of Development. To familiarize yourself more with the current thinking around Java EE 7, I'd like to remind you of this recent interview with spec lead Roberto Chinnici...

Arun Gupta presents TOTD #157: GlassFish 3.1 Blogs & Screencasts -

GlassFish 3.1 was released yesterday ... yay! This TipOf The Day (TOTD) will provide the list of blogs/screencasts produced by the GlassFish team: 1. Connecting Securely to GlassFish via JMX (Prasad); 2. Securing Administration in GlassFish Server 3.1 - 1: Admin Authentication (Tim); 3. Securing Administration in GlassFish Server 3.1 - 2: Remote Administration (Tim)...

Geertjan Wielenga writes about the i18ncheckertool:

i18nchecker is a tool resulting from the discussion inspired by a trip to Experian in Monaco (where a risk management system on the NetBeans Platform is created) "One Big Bundle File For Internationalization" in this blog, from 1 December 2010. In that discussion, Tim Dudgeon from ChemAxon...

Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Bob Rhubart's Java.net Reborn:

Java.net, the home of Java community projects, has been re-launched with a new look and new tools for developers. The move from CollabNet to the Kenai infrastructure offers more flexibility for developers who want to host or contribute to community projects. Instead of the large, fixed infrastructure per project (for example, several mailing lists per project), Kenai's ala carte features allow users to take only what they need...

We're also still featuring Yuli Vasiliev's article, How to XQuery Non-JDBC Sources from JDBC:

It has been possible to use XQuery, the query and programming language for manipulating XML data, from JDBC code since the release of Oracle Database 10g Release 2, when XQuery first appeared in Oracle XML DB. However, using the XQuery and XML DB features that first became available with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 -- like extension-expression pragmas and indexing unstructured XML content

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