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http://www.brussels-jug.be/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/brussels_jug_be_logo_a_180.jpgThe Brussels Java User Group will be celebrating their first anniversary at their Thursday, April 28 meeting. The discussion topic for the meeting is Java EE 6, GlassFish and OSGi. Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine will be the guest speaker for that topic:

"Most of you certainly know Alexis. He is a member of the GlassFish team and has been acting as the ambassador for the project for the past couple of years. He has been working at Oracle (Sun Microsystems) for over 10 years and is a regular speaker at development and JUG conferences such as Devoxx, JCertif, JavaOne or JavaZone. He also spends quality time with customers, developers, and architects to better drive the evolution of Oracle middleware technologies. Alexis also participates in various open source communities."

Chris Gruwier and Tom Vleminckx will also speak at the meeting, presenting "Continuous build on steroids."

The Brussels JUG About page introduces the group's founding principles:

The idea of creating a JUG in Brussels was born out of the conclusion that despite of the fact that Brussels shelters thousands of Java developers, the city lacks what we would consider a

The Oracle Technology Network will be presenting four free Virtual Developer Days in the next five weeks, with schedules tuned for the Americas, Europe/Russia, and Asia/Pacific. The title is "bringing JSF to the next level," with a focus on Rich Enterprise Applications. Here's Pieter Humphrey's introductory description:

JSF developers won't want to miss this virtual event about Rich Enterprise Applications -- which is all about a server side approach to Rich Internet Applications. By extending JSF with frameworks like Oracle ADF, enterprise developers can easily wire GUI widgets to enterprise services - anything from database data, web services, business process and workflow, LDAP user directories to Portal/Enterprise 2.0 services like blogs, social activity and collaboration services.

The Virtual Conference Agenda shows the conference occupying 4.5 hours. After a keynote address on Rich Enterprise Applications, there are three one-hour breakout sessions in each of five tracks:

  • Basic Track
  • Advanced Track
  • Hands on Lab Track
  • Best Practices Track
  • Enterprise Track

The breakout sessions are followed by a survey and event checkout.

Many of the sessions focus on the Oracle Application Developer Framework (ADF) Fusion Middleware. So this will be of greater value to you if you're working with Oracle middleware.

The first virtual developer day happens on Tuesday, May 3, 8:00-12:30 US Pacific Time. On Tuesday, May 17, the time shifts to be more suitable for developers in Eastern North America, Central America, and South America (8:00-12:30 US Eastern Time). The Tuesday, May 31 virtual conference is timed for developers in Europe and Russia (8:00-12:30 UK Time). And on Thursday, June 2, the timing shifts for audiences further to the East, in Asia and the Pacific (8:00-12:30 India Standard Time).

You can register for any of the virtual developer days right now. And, you can follow and tweet about the sessions on Twitter using the #OTNVDD tag.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been a couple interesting java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How many times in the past decade have you switched your primary IDE / code editor?" Voting ends today.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Deepak Vohra's Using Spring

Last week, on April 12th and 13th, JavaOne Russia was held at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. A few days (April 16-17) and about 5500 km (~3500 miles) away in the time-space continuum, the first ever Chennai Java Summittook place.

Oracle's Sharat Chander has uploaded a JavaOne 2011 - Moscow, Russia web album onto Picassa. If you'd like to listen to some interviews that took place at the conference, check out Java Spotlight Episode 25: JavaOne Russia, which features interviews with people at the conference's Java DEMOGrounds (pictured above).

http://www.jugchennai.in/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/ChennaiJavaSummit11-300x225.jpgMeanwhile, photos from the Chennai Java Summit, an initiative of India's JUG Chennai, are now available as a slide series at the end of theChennai Java Summit

http://netbeans.org/images_www/v5/nb-logo2.gifNetBeans IDE 7.0 was released today. The Oracle announcement describes Version 7.0 as the "first integrated development environment to offer support for the forthcoming JDK 7 release" and says the "enhancements enable faster and more efficient application development."

You can download NetBeans 7.0, and to help you get started, several screencastsare available.

In addition to providing support for the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release, NetBeans 7.0 also includes enhanced integration with WebLogic server, added support for Oracle databases and GlassFish 3.1, Maven 3, HTML 5 editing, a new GridBagLayout designer for Swing GUI development, Java editor enhancements, and more. View theNetBeans IDE 7.0 Overview screencast for more details.

As Oracle Tools and Middleware chief architect and senior vice president Ted Farrell said:

Oracle continues to enhance the NetBeans platform, providing developers with a feature-rich, open-source IDE for the creation of Java-based mobile, Web and desktop applications.

A year or two ago, we were wondering what would become of NetBeans once Oracle completed its acquisition of Sun. The answer's quite clear today!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted interesting java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How many times in the past decade have you switched your primary IDE / code editor?" Voting will close on Monday.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Deepak Vohra's Using Spring

This past Friday, Ramiro Rinaudo wrote about his experience in Starting a Java User Group in Argentina. According to its Meetup-based web site, Java User Group Argentina was founded on February 9. Their first meeting was on March 17, and the next will happen next Thursday, April 28. The Meetup group currently has 120 members.

So, how did JUG Argentina come to be? Here's Ramiro's description:

When MuleSoft opened the office in Buenos Aires, everybody from San Francisco was asking about the Java User Group here. We researched and found that there were a couple of initiatives to start it but died long time ago. We thought it would be great not only to sponsor one, but to create it and help Argentina to have it's own Java User Group.

Ramiro set out contacting lots of Java developers and many expressed interest in organizing and getting involved in a new Java User Group.

I organized a meeting which we got at least 20 people from the initial companies, to get first impressions and how we should move things forward. I saw people got really involved and interested in discussing, learning and sharing knowledge.

After that, things accelerated:

In 2 weeks, more than 80 people joined the group and we expect it to keep growing.

The goal is to

Make JUG Argentina a central place for the best java developers in Argentina. A place to discuss and work together the future of many java technologies. A place people who is starting in java can see where the technology is going and how they can be part of that future.

JUG Argentina's experience shows that, where there are lots of Java developers, there will likely be plenty of interest in forming a Java User Group if one doesn't already exist. It doesrequire one or more energetic people who are willing to take the time to build the structure, arrange meetings, etc. But like-minded helpers can usually be found. In addition, as Ramiro found, often local companies whose success depends on Java developers will be more than willing to lend assistance.

Congratulations to Java User Group Argentina on getting off to a great start!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted interesting java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How soon do you expect to attend your next Java-related technology conference?" Voting closes today.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Episode 25: JavaOne Russia -

Live from JavaOne Russia. Interviews with DEMOGrounds staff at the Java booths at JavaOne Russia. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Dalibor Topic, Java Free and Open Source Software Ambassador...

We're also featuring Adam Bien's new article, Contexts and Dependency Injection in Java EE 6:

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 5 brought dependency injection (DI) with Convention over Configuration to Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3.0. Java EE 6 introduces the flexible and powerful @Inject dependency injection model (JSR-330 and JSR-299) in addition to the already existing@EJB annotation. So when should you use what?

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

In a session that was much tweeted about at JAX London today, the new site try-clojure.org was introduced. The session, titled Getting started with Clojure, and presented by John Stevenson (@JR0cket on Twitter), aimed to introduce:

the essential things you need to get going with Clojure; why use Clojure; the essential Language concepts; calling Java from Clojure; Clojure frameworks; IDE support (Emacs, Eclipse, Netbeans), Build tools (Leningen, Maven).

Based on the tweets, this was a highly entertaining session:

  • Martijn Verburg (@karianna): "@JR0cket start to the #clojure talk is darn funny, a gentle intro so far." And: "Audience: "What does nil mean?" @JR0cket --> "It's a #Clojure thing" queue laughter"
  • Kevin Wright (@thecoda): @JRocket -> "This isn't the real world, this is #JAXLondon"
  • Martijn again: "A talk that can only be described as chaotic fun by @JR0cket , #clojure Someone's going to have to drag him off the stage :)"
  • Sandro Mancuso (@sandromancuso): "Having loads of fun watching @JR0cket's #clojure talk." And: "#clojure talk by @JR0cket. Definitely THE MOST entertaining talk ever."
  • David Green (activelylazy): "this is where we do all the really cool stuff, but I'm not gonna tell you cos we've run out of time" @JR0cket

But in addition to all the fun, a "cool" (Alex Blewitt, @allblue) online clojure REPLwas introduced -- that is, try-clojure.org/. Sandro Mancuso's (@sandromancuso) reaction: "nice."

The concept is fairly simple. As the home page explains:

Welcome to Try Clojure. Above, you have a Clojure REPL. You can type expressions and see their results right here in your browser.

The site also includes a brief tutorial and relevant links. It's a good place to start, if you've been curious about clojure, but haven't yet taken time to introduce yourself.

There were lots of other sessions that drew considerable attention at JAX London today, including Martijn Verburg's Back to the future with Java 7; and Apache TomEE: Tomcat with a Kick, presented by David Blevins and Jonathan Gallimore. I certainly could go on, but I'm out of time for today. Hopefully, many or most of the JAX London presentations will soon be available online. And, there's a fall edition of the conference to look forward to as well!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Jody Garnett posted a blog titled ObjectAid.


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How soon do you expect to attend your next Java-related technology conference?" Voting will close on Monday.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Adam Bien's new article, Contexts and Dependency Injection in Java EE 6:

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 5 brought dependency injection (DI) with Convention over Configuration to Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3.0. Java EE 6 introduces the flexible and powerful @Inject dependency injection model (JSR-330 and JSR-299) in addition to the already existing@EJB annotation. So when should you use what?

We're also featuring Java Spotlight Episode 24: Joe Darcy on Project Coin:

Interview with Joe Darcy, Project Coin Lead, on the JDK 7 changes coming from Project Coin. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Dalibor Topic, Java Free and Open Source Software Ambassador, and Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine, Java EE Developer Advocate...

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

As Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine noted on Saturday, April is Java month around the world -- that's definitely the case this year, anyway. Alexis points out seven pretty major events happening this week (including JAX London, JavaOne Russia, and CONFESS 2011), and more to come next week.

Today, JAX London's Pre-Conference Day is under way. It features tutorials and also Agile Day. If you look at the JAX Conference Overview, you see that it has a somewhat unusual structure with respect to schedule. While the conference runs for three days, the schedule is structured into "days" named after individual topics. For example, there's Agile Day, Java EE Day, Systems Integration Day, Spring Day, ... Called Special Days by the conference organizers, these:

"will show important themes in an comprehensive sense. Moderated by an expert of the respective theme, they present in many sessions comprehensive knowledge and a perfect place to exchange your experiences."

What's nice about this is that it facilitates attending the conference for fewer than all three days, if your primary interest is localized to a specific topic area. And, true to form, the JAX pricing structure lets you take advantage of the schedule, by letting you purchase a one-day, two-day, or full three-day registration. In other words, you purchase only the specific conference days you're interested in. That can be a real money saver. I hope other conferences will take note.

Of course, you can follow JAX London as it happens on Twitter, via @jaxlondon or a search for the #jaxlondon tag. As I write this (20:30 GMT):

  • Arun Gupta has just tweeted about the excellent JAX London reception and speakers dinner;
  • Regarding today's sessions, @akesterton says he "particularly liked the sky.com one on agile development (for small co-located teams)"; and
  • Sandro Mancuso has finished providing running commentary on the agile panel discussion he attended.

As I've said before, Twitter isn't my favorite method for following conferences remotely -- but I'll take it in the absence of something better. I think in the 'olden days' (i.e., pre-Twitter), when people would write somewhat organized blog posts during and following a session or a day at a conference, it was easier for a remote observer to get a feel for the really significant information that was being presented.

Still, I intend to use Twitter substantially this week, and next week, while also searching for blog posts, as I follow what Alexis pretty aptly is calling "Java month around the world".


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, a couple interesting new java.net blogs have been posted by others:

NetBeans IDE 7.0 is much in the news right now. Release Candidate 1 has been available for some days now. For example, our latest java.net poll, designed in response to that news, asks "When do you plan to start using NetBeans 7.0?". Voting ends on Monday.

Also of note, DZone has released an updated edition of its NetBeans RefCard, NetBeans Platform 7.0: A Framework for Building Pluggable Enterprise Applications.

And the next Oracle Technology Network TechCast Live, on Tuesday, April 12, at 10 PM Pacific (US) Time, features John Jullion-Ceccarelli, NetBeans Engineering Manager. John will be discussing NetBeans IDE 7.0, which introduces language support for Java SE 7, with TechCast host Justin Kestelyn.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "When do you plan to start using NetBeans 7.0?" Voting will close on Monday.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JAX Innovations Awards 2011:

The JAX Innovation Awards celebrate the culture of innovation that epitomises the Java Ecosystem. Our mission is simple: Reward those technologies, companies, organizations and individuals that make outstanding contributions to Java. YOU nominate the individuals, companies and technologies whom you think deserve recognition...

We're also still featuring the NetBeans IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1:

NetBeans IDE 7.0 introduces language support for development to the Java SE 7 specification with the JDK 7 platform. The release also provides enhanced integration with the Oracle WebLogic server, as well as support for Oracle Database and GlassFish 3.1. Additional highlights include Maven 3 and HTML5 editing support...

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The 200th NetBeans Screenshot Contest is a competition celebrating the diversity of applications that have been developed on the NetBeans platform. Currently there are 198 screenshots in the NetBeans Platform Showcase. Looking ahead to the 200th screenshot, last month Geertjan Wielengaorganized a contest. The contest was originally scheduled to run through March 31, but Geertjan has just announced that the contest will now run through the end of April.

Geertjan has devoted considerable time and effort to discovering applications on the Web that show clear signs of having been built on the NetBeans Platform. Search for YANPA (Yet Another NetBeans Platform Application) on his blog, and you'll see links to a selection of his posts about his discoveries.

http://netbeans.dzone.com/sites/all/files/ccrmplatform_small.png
Figure 1. CCRM Radio Monitoring Toolkit Framework, an all-in-one Belgium-based radio monitoring platform.

In his latest blog, Geertjan features some of the screenshots that have already been entered into the 200th Screenshot competion. These span many different realms, from a network inventory application, to a military app, to engineering simulation, interior design, seismic wave processing, and various monitoring applications. It's quite impressive!

Like Geertjan, I'm sure there are many more fantastic NetBeans apps out there that could vie for the honor of winning the contest and becoming the 200th application screenshot in the NetBeans gallery. The prize includes a free NetBeans book of your choice, as well as a bit of free publicity for your app.

If you'd like to enter a screenshot of your NetBeans application into the contest, follow the submission instructions at the end of Geertjan's blog.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks When do you plan to start using NetBeans 7.0? Voting will be open for the next week.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JAX Innovations Awards 2011:

The JAX Innovation Awards celebrate the culture of innovation that epitomises the Java Ecosystem. Our mission is simple: Reward those technologies, companies, organizations and individuals that make outstanding contributions to Java. YOU nominate the individuals, companies and technologies whom you think deserve recognition...

We're also still featuring NetBeans IDE 7.0 Release Candidate 1:

NetBeans IDE 7.0 introduces language support for development to the Java SE 7 specification with the JDK 7 platform. The release also provides enhanced integration with the Oracle WebLogic server, as well as support for Oracle Database and GlassFish 3.1. Additional highlights include Maven 3 and HTML5 editing support...

Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

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