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https://maven.java.net/images/nexus.pngSonatype's NexusMaven service is now available for java.net projects. The new service will be replacing the java.net Maven2-repositoryproject. java.net's Nexus Version 1.9.1.1 is hosted at https://maven.java.net.

 

If you're unfamiliar with the benefits of Maven repository managers, you'll find a good introduction in John Ferguson Smart's java.net article, Maven Repository Managers for the Enterprise. John cites the following benefits as key reasons for using a Maven repository manager:

A correctly-configured repository manager can speed up your builds, save bandwidth, help you share artifacts within your organization, and give you better control as to what dependencies are used in your projects and where they are coming from. It can also play a key role in your development infrastructure, helping you set up a fully-blown automated build and deployment pipeline.

To learn about the main features of Nexus 1.9.1.1, visit Sonatype's Nexus page. The overview includes a link to an introductory video and also points you to the introductory chapter of the book, Repository Management with Nexus. The Sonatype Pro for Nexus page provides more links to references on what's included in the Nexus Professional edition (what we have on java.net).

A Java.net Maven Repository Usage Guide is available to help you get started with applying java.net's Nexus Maven repository hosting service to your project. Sonatype created the Usage Guide, and they are actively involved in providing and managing java.net's Nexus service. Using the service:

You can deploy snapshots, stage releases, and promote your releases so they will be synced to Maven Central. To assure the quality of artifacts in Maven Central, all new release versions must meet some quality requirements. Once you have new a release version deployed to Nexus repository, we will help you clean up old versions and sync them into central.

Migration from Maven 2

Now that Nexus is up and running, java.net's legacy Maven 2 repository serviceis scheduled for eventual deprecation. No deprecation date has yet been set. However, if you've been using the Maven 2 service, you'll want to migrate your project to Nexus sooner rather than later, to avoid any potential downtime or other issues. The starting point for migrating your project to the new Nexus Maven service is to create a JIRA ticket requesting that your project be migrated. Refer to theJava.net Maven Repository Usage Guide for more information.

The GlassFish projects and several others have already been migrated to Nexus, so the process is already tested and well understood. Basically, the migration involves the following steps (after you've submitted your Jira request):

  • validate and repair (if necessary) the old Maven 2 artifacts;
  • move/copy the artifacts to the new repository;
  • configure access in Nexus to the new project; and
  • learn how to use the new repository.

Most of this is handled by Sonatype, which will work closely with each project team as their project is migrated.

The Sonatype Nexus Maven repository service is a major addition to the toolkit available to java.net project owners, one that was long requested, and which turned out to be a long time in coming. It's great to have it up and running on the new java.net!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Fabrizio Giudici also published a blog post that just happens to be related to Maven 3, Happiness is...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting will close on Monday, June 6.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the announcement, JavaFX 2.0 Beta Now Available:

The much-anticipated JavaFX 2.0 beta release is now available for download - which means you can take advantage of all the new benefits that JavaFX 2.0 brings to the Java platform. This release is the latest development in Oracle

Due to a large number of requests from the Java community, the JavaOne 2011 Call for Papers has been extended for three days, through 11:59 PM Pacific Daily Time on Thursday, May 26. You can submit your proposed papers here.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Frans Thamura posted a new blog titled What's cool inside Java.net - GIT - JIRA (Greenhooper*) - Multiple SCM.


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting be open for the next two weeks.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is a podcast,Java Spotlight Episode 30: Henrik St

The results of the latest java.net poll present an interesting picture of participation in Java/JVM-related open source projects. A total of 62 votes were cast in the poll. Here are the exact question and the voting tally:

What's the highest level of your participation in open source projects that use the Java/JVM platform?

  • 31% (19 votes) - I lead a Java/JVM open source project
  • 5% (3 votes) - I am a committer
  • 5% (3 votes) - I assist in testing and debugging
  • 16% (10 votes) - I follow projects closely, but don't actively participate
  • 35% (22 votes) - I use Java/JVM open source software
  • 5% (3 votes) - I don't know
  • 3% (2 votes) - Other

At first, looking at these numbers, I wondered if the pattern implied that open source project leaders were more likely to participate in the poll than participants who are not project leaders (i.e., those who develop and commit code, or test and debug it). But then, thinking about the projects on java.net and at other open source project forges, it struck me that a great many open source projects are actually one-person endeavors. Sure, the most famous projects have much larger teams, with the very biggest projects often including developers who work on the projects full time for the corporations that employ them. But the vast majority of open source projects have one member: the founder.

Considering this, my guess is that the reason "I lead a Java/JVM open source project" received many more votes than "I am a committer" and "I assist in testing and debugging" is that most of the open source project participants who chose to vote in the poll are project leads for one-person projects. I could be wrong, of course, but...

And, of course, java.net polls are not scientific, so no broad, objective conclusions can be drawn from the results of our limited survey.

New poll: How do you like the new java.net now?

The java.new web site and infrastructure underwent significant changes at the end of February, 2011. Our underlying project infrastructure is now the Project Kenai platform that Sun invented toward the end of its days as an independent company. And, the content side of our web site has a new structure and look and feel (home page with tabs, etc.).

So now that you've gotten used to the new java.net over the past few months, what's your view of the changes? That's the topic of our new poll, which specifically asks: "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting will be open for the next two weeks.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been several significant java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting be open for the next two weeks.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Michael Kopp's article How Garbage Collection differs in the three big JVMs -

Most articles about Garbage Collection ignore the fact that the Sun Hotspot JVM is not the only game in town. In fact whenever you have to work with either IBM WebSphere or Oracle WebLogic you will run on a different runtime. While the concept of Garbage Collection is the same, the implementation is not and neither are the default settings or how to tune it...

We're also featuring the news that the JavaOne 2011 Call for Papers Submission Period Ends on May 23 -

JavaOne is the premiere conference for you to share your Java programming expertise with fellow community members. Only 1 week left to submit your sessions for the JavaOne Call for Papers. We encourage you to submitinnovative proposals that demonstrate your passion for using Java technology in real-world scenarios or leading edge use-cases. Don

IntelliJIDEA Version 10.5 has just been released. Significant new features include:

  • Full Java 7 Support;
  • Reworked UI for refactorings and Search/Replace, simplified code completion;
  • JavaScript Debugger in Google Chrome;
  • Groovy 1.8 and Spring 3.1 support;
  • JavaScript, Android and Flex enhancements;
  • Jetty integration; and
  • XSLT2 support.

IntelliJ IDEA project lead Max Shafir had this to say about the current release, and what will come next:

"While this release focuses on Java 7 support, we also worked hard on making the most common IDE operations easier to use. Some of these changes, such as new in-place refactorings and a reworked search/replace UI, made it to this release, while others will be available in version 11 later this year."

http://www.jetbrains.com/idea/img/injection_before_after_tn.gif

JetBrains has announced that IntelliJ IDEA 10.5 Ultimate is available at a reduced price compared with previous versions, for both individual developers and companies. Also, if you purchased an IntelliJ IDEA license after November 1, 2010, you're qualified for a free upgrade to IntelliJ IDEA 10.5.

Of course, the open source Community Edition is available for free to anyone (the Ultimate Edition is free to educators and open source projects).

With the 10.5 release, IntelliJ IDEA provides important advances that will surely be welcomed by the Java development community.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Fabrizio Giudici posted an interesting blog about Managing configuration files with JAXB and the Visitor Pattern.


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What's the highest level of your participation in open source projects that use the Java/JVM platform?" Voting will close on Monday.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Michael Kopp's article How Garbage Collection differs in the three big JVMs -

Most articles about Garbage Collection ignore the fact that the Sun Hotspot JVM is not the only game in town. In fact whenever you have to work with either IBM WebSphere or Oracle WebLogic you will run on a different runtime. While the concept of Garbage Collection is the same, the implementation is not and neither are the default settings or how to tune it...

We're also featuring the news that the JavaOne 2011 Call for Papers Submission Period Ends on May 23 -

JavaOne is the premiere conference for you to share your Java programming expertise with fellow community members. Only 1 week left to submit your sessions for the JavaOne Call for Papers. We encourage you to submitinnovative proposals that demonstrate your passion for using Java technology in real-world scenarios or leading edge use-cases. Don

In our latest java.net article, Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza introduce jHepWork, a powerful, well-designed, free data analysis and data mining framework. jHepWork is 100% Java; hence, the entire range of Java computational and data analysis libraries can be utilized. jHepWork also leverages Jython, facilitating its use by students and researchers who know the Python language but have little familiarity with Java.

http://today.java.net/sites/default/files/jhepwork_small.png
jHepWork IDE with several interactive graphs.

The title of Sergei's and Alejandro's article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork. Sergei is a primary developer of jHepWork. Alejandro contributed to the design and validation of the framework. jHepWork:

was designed for scientists, engineers and students who need numerical and statistical computations, data and function visualization and even symbolic computation.

The article begins with an introduction to jHepWork. The rational of integrating Jython is presented, but the authors also note that:

one should also keep in mind that one can always use a pure Java approach to develop data-mining analysis programs using jHepWork since all numerical and graphical libraries of jHepWork are implemented in 100% Java. Or one can use an alternative scripting language, such as BeanShell or the Java scripting API shipped with the javax.script package. Finally, one can enjoy using the powerful Eclipse or Netbeans IDEs while editing analysis programs

I've spent decades writing software to analyze and display high-volume scientific data streams. I wish I'd known about jHepWork before now. I don't think there's any doubt that I would have applied it to some of my work. Now that I do know about jHepWork, seeing how I can use it for the new project I'm about to start is high on my to-do list.

In the article, Sergei and Alejandro walk us through some basic data imports, analysis, and display, showing how a great deal can be accomplished with very few lines of code.

Getting started with jHepWork looks quite straightforward. Near the end of the article, the authors tell us:

jHepWork comes with more than 200 example scripts, a detailed on-line tutorial and even a book describing all aspects of the Jython and jHepWork approach to data analysis. To run the examples included in the jHepWork IDE, simply go to the main Menu, select [Tools] and then [jHPlot examples]. Then one can open a Jython example code and run it in the jHepWork IDE.

jHepWork is one of the most powerful and flexible free data analysis and visualization tools I've seen (in 30+ years of working in this area). It's 100% Java, and offers the flexibility to access its capabilities using Jython or other software interfaces.

Sergei and Alejandro provide an excellent introduction to the framework in Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork. I recommend reading the article if you're interested in seeing some of Java's less talked about capabilities in action, and especially if your job involves data mining and analysis.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been quite a few significant java.net blogs composed by other java.net bloggers:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What's the highest level of your participation in open source projects that use the Java/JVM platform?" Voting will close next Monday.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the news that the JavaOne 2011 Call for Papers Submission Period Ends on May 23 -

JavaOne is the premiere conference for you to share your Java programming expertise with fellow community members. Only 1 week left to submit your sessions for the JavaOne Call for Papers. We encourage you to submitinnovative proposals that demonstrate your passion for using Java technology in real-world scenarios or leading edge use-cases. Don

JAX Innovations Award nominations will close this coming Monday. So, if you'd like to nominate a Java technology, company, or ambassador, the time to submit your nomination(s) is now.

The mission of the JAX Innovations Awards is to foster the spirit of innovation in the Java realm, and promote cutting-edge Java technologies. The judges include:

  • RedMonk founder James Governor;
  • Canoo Engineering AG Fellow Dierk K

As I write this, JavaOne and Oracle Develop is getting under way in Hyderabad, India. The conference, located at the Hyderabad International Convention Center, will run for two days. The conference agenda shows something I've not seen before at a conference: Tea Break (from 10:45 to 11:30 AM, and again from 4:00 to 4:30 PM). JavaOne and Oracle Develop are clearly organized with awareness of local customs!

Looking further into the schedule, the JavaOne Keynote (on Tuesday) is titled "Java Strategy and Directions" (presented by Nandini Ramani and Param Singh). The conference gives attention to a broad spectrum of Java/JVM technologies, with sessions on JavaFX 2.0, JDK 7, Java ME, Java EE 6, etc. Tuesday afternoon features a JavaOne Technical Keynote, with presentations on "Java SE: The Road Ahead" (Simon Ritter), "Java EE: The Evolution of the Java Platform" (Arun Gupta), and "Java ME and Embedded: A Fresh Look at the Future" (Terrence Barr). Additional Day 1 sessions include a look at Java NIO.2 in JDK 7, and sessions on JAX-RS, LWUIT, JPA 2.0, Garbage Collection, ...

Wednesday's sessions include coverage of NetBeans IDE 7, HTML5, scalability, Project Coin, Java EE 6 in the cloud, Java in embedded and TV devices, GlassFish 3.1, Servlet 3.0, Java Server Faces 2.0, the JCP, JavaCard, Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI), and more.

In a recent java.net poll, a fair share of people indicated that they consider the regional JavaOnes to be a great innovation. I certainly agree with that, myself.

I wanted to check out Twitter to see what people are tweeting from JavaOne Hyderabad. Unfortunately, for me Twitter is basically down right now (I get only a page header). Does the start of JavaOne and Oracle Develop India have anything to do with this? I wonder...


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been three interesting java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What's the highest level of your participation in open source projects that use the Java/JVM platform?" Voting will close on Monday.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Deepak Vohra's Using Spring

The results of a recent java.net poll suggest that, while developers are fairly reluctant to change their primary IDE or code editor, across a long enough time span, most developers do make a change (or multiple changes). A total of 48 votes were cast in the poll. The exact question and results were:

How many times in the past decade have you switched your primary IDE / code editor?

  • 27% (13 votes) - Never
  • 44% (21 votes) - Once
  • 17% (8 votes) - Two or three times
  • 13% (6 votes) - Four or more times
  • 0% (0 votes) - I don't know

This is of course not a scientific survey, but the results seem reasonable. Switching IDEs takes time and effort, and reduces productivity at least for a while. And, who can afford even a temporary reduction in productivity? So, a switch has an up-front cost that must be balanced by an expectation of future productivity gains that ultimately more than offset the near-term loss.

Still, over the course of a decade, almost three fourths of developers indicated they made at least one switch. This makes sense, because over 10 years, different IDEs/editors will advance at different paces, perhaps new IDEs/editors are introduced that offer attractive capabilities, etc.

The clear bulge in the data is "once" -- 44% of the voters made a single primary IDE/editor switch in the past decade. Meanwhile, 27% stayed with the same primary IDE/editor throughout that period; and 30% switched their primary IDE/editor multiple times.

I'm glad no one said they didn't know how many times they switched their primary IDE/editor!


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What's your view of Oracle's handling of JavaOne?" Voting will close on Monday.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post (Happy First Year Anniversary, Brussels Java User Group!), there have been several interesting java.net blogs composed by others:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Deepak Vohra's Using Spring

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