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http://www.oracle.com/ocom/groups/public/@otn/documents/digitalasset/402460.gifThe results of the most recent java.net poll suggest that the JavaFX 2.0 Beta release is drawing mixed reviews from the developer community. A total of 58 votes were cast, and the voters posted seven comments. The exact poll question and results were:

Do you intend to experiment with the JavaFX 2.0 Beta Release?

  • 14% (8 votes) - I'm already working with it
  • 17% (10 votes) - I've downloaded it, but haven't yet experimented much
  • 14% (8 votes) - I intend to download JavaFX 2.0 Beta soon
  • 12% (7 votes) - I'll wait for the JavaFX 2.0 final release
  • 21% (12 votes) - I have no interest in JavaFX
  • 12% (7 votes) - I don't know
  • 10% (6 votes) - Other

These numbers are pretty unusual among java.net polls: no response option garnered more than 21% of the cast votes.

Doing some summing, about 45% of the voters have downloaded JavaFX 2.0 Beta, or plan to do so soon. Another 12% might eventually download the Beta (they selected the "I don't know" option). And 12% plan to download JavaFX 2.0 when the final release comes out. So, we can say that about 70% of the voters expressed some interest in JavaFX 2.0.

On the other hand, 21% said "I have no interest in JavaFX," and 10% selected "Other." The seven comments were likely posted by people who selected one of these options. mclarke4stated the complaint against the current JavaFX in his representative comment:

I was using JavaFX before but since there is no plan for a Linux release in the final version what is the point? JavaFX certainly won't be cross-platform so whats the point of using it unless you want to be locked in to a platform?

Among many developers, this remains a key problem for JavaFX. The JavaFX 2.0 Beta System Requirements page shows that JavaFX 2.0 is a Windows-only framework at present. It's not clear if support of Mac and Linux is upcoming. For example, a search of the JavaFX 2.0 Roadmap turns up no mention of Mac or Linux.

New poll: java.net's new Maven repo manager

Our new poll asks What's your view of the addition of Sonatype's Nexus Maven repository manager to the java.net project stack? Voting will be open until Friday, July 8.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been several significant java.net blogs composed by others:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is "A Method for Reducing Contention and Overhead in Worker Queues for Multithreaded Java Applications", by Sathiskumar Palaniappan, Kavitha Varadarajan, and Jayashree Viswanathan.


Java News

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Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Yolande Poirier's Java and Parallelism Computing: An Interview with Java Developer and Researcher Dr. Gilda Garret

The results of the last java.net poll indicate that the community in general considers the new java.net to be better than the previous edition of the site -- but further improvement in many areas is still needed. The poll was designed to be a forum through which the community could provide feedback on the changes to java.net that were implemented starting in late February. A total of 96 votes were cast, and a valuable conversation was carried on in 15 posted comments.

The actual question and voting results were:

Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?

  • 20% (19 votes) - It's much improved
  • 45% (43 votes) - It's better, but some areas still need improvement
  • 9% (9 votes) - I likejava.net about the same as I did before
  • 19% (18 votes) - The old site was better
  • 3% (3 votes) - I don't know
  • 4% (4 votes) - Other

For java.net, this is a very positive set of numbers (65% consider the site to be improved compared with its previous edition). At the same time, it's clear that most people who chose to vote believe java.net could be better. The posted comments emphasize this by pointing out several problem areas, and pointing out the seriousness of the site's deficiencies.

For example, wadechandler, in a thoughtful and detailed comment, said:

I think whoever is working on Java.net needs to seriously check out SourceForge.net and GitHub.com. I find Java.net to be quite "anti-social" with its anemic feature set. Heck, I'm honestly trying to use it out of loyalty and all, but it is pretty frustrating in some areas, and I'm debating going back to SourceForge for my own projects because who has time to waste.

One of the problems with java.net is the lack of documentation for the users. For example, Wade asked "How do I contact and arbitrary user of Java.net? So, I know their name and their user name, and I want to send them a message..."

It's actually quite easy to accomplish this on java.net, because sending an email to javaNetUserName@java.net automatically forwards the message to that user. But, only a few people know this. In addition, the performance of email initiated through java.net addresses has often been poor (including project email lists). The performance problems are being addressed. But, if you'd like to contact an arbitrary java.net user, and you send an email to javaNetUserName@java.net, you can be pretty certain that your message will get through, ultimately.

Java.net really could use a User's Guide of some sort, whether a wiki, or a java-net-doc project, or something like that. The java.net team is aware of our documentation deficit -- but, reading the comments posted to this poll makes me think this is a more serious problem than I had considered it to be before now.

New poll: JavaFX 2.0 Beta

Our new poll asks "Do you intend to experiment with the JavaFX 2.0 Beta Release?"Voting will be open until this Friday, June 24.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post (New java.net Article: Reducing Contention and Overhead in Worker Queues), the following java.net blogs have been published by other java.net bloggers:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is "A Method for Reducing Contention and Overhead in Worker Queues for Multithreaded Java Applications", by Sathiskumar Palaniappan, Kavitha Varadarajan, and Jayashree Viswanathan.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Yolande Poirier's Java and Parallelism Computing: An Interview with Java Developer and Researcher Dr. Gilda Garret

kfarnham

Welcome, FasoJUG! Blog

Posted by kfarnham Jun 8, 2011

http://java.net/attachments/wiki_images/fasojug/fasojug2.pngOne of the newest java.net projects is FasoJUG, the java.net home of Burkina Faso's new Java User Group. The JUG was founded by java.net member Constantin Drabo in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

http://cdn.dzone.com/sites/all/files/imagecache/user_90/avatars/picture-298984.jpgConstantin posted an entry at NetBeans Zone describing the launch of "the youngest African JUG" as follows:

On the morning of 16 May 2011 some Java passionned guys assisted in the lauch of the latest JUG, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. It is named FASOJUG. This Java User Group is founded by me, Constantin DRABO, together with Dr. Paul Kabor

At the request of several members of the community, the current java.net poll will be staying open for some extra days, until Friday, June 10. If you haven't yet voted, please take the time to do so. Your vote and especially your comments will help us improve java.net going forward.

The poll asks:

Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?

The results of the poll will be used by the java.net team as it plans upcoming work efforts relating to modifying and enhancing the site.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been significant java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting has been extended to Friday, June 10.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Amy Fowler's JavaFX2.0 Layout: A Class Tour -

JavaFX2.0 Beta is out. We

A few months ago, java.net underwent some pretty major changes: we migrated to a new project infrastructure (Kenai), and we switched to a modernized Web look and feel. The Kenai infrastructure brought many benefits to java.net projects, including the Subversion and Git version control systems, and JIRA issue and project tracking. And, as I wrote about in my last blog post, Sonatype's Nexus Maven service is also now available for java.net projects.

Given a fairly small team, I think we've come a long way in a relatively short time. But, that's just my opinion. What do you think? Our current poll asks that specific question:

Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?

We're in the final days of the poll (it will close on Monday), so get your vote in now. Also, feel free to post a comment expressing your view in greater detail.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been several significant java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Now that you're accustomed to it, what do you think of the new java.net?" Voting will close on Monday, June 6.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Data Analysis and Data Mining Using Java, Jython and jHepWork, by Sergei Chekanov and Alejandro D. P. de Astorza.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is The JCP reform and what it means for the Java developer by Ben Evans and Martijn Verburg:

Earlier this month, the LJC, aka the London Java User Group (JUG) became the first JUG to be elected to an open seat on the Java Standard Edition/Enterprise Edition Executive Committee (Java SE/EE EC in short). In this post, we

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