Skip navigation

A few days ago, I received my email announcing that the premiere edition of Java Magazine is now available. The magazine is published bi-monthly in digital and mobile formats, and subscriptions are free.

I wasn't entirely sure what to expect from Java Magazine. I contributed some of the community-related content in the "Java Nation" section, but I didn't have any inside information on what the rest of the magazine was going to be like.

Over the decades, I had subscribed to a great many technology-related magazines in print format, many of them for free (provided that I updated my professional information once a year or so). But I slowly let most of those subscriptions drop away, as the internet became a more prominent and convenient source of technology information and news. So, initially, Java Magazine sounded to me like it might be a new incarnation of something that had had a hey-day when technology magazines were still published primarily in print form. Having perused the first issue, I can report that Java Magazine is much more than that.

The role of all print media, and even of online newspapers and magazines, is changing rapidly. A question is: do we need any of it in an age where news and links of interest are transmitted rapidly across the world through 140-character tweets?

My answer is a resounding yes! And, in my opinion, the need becomes more substantial with each passing day.

Firing off a dozen tweets containing your latest momentary thoughts is not the same thing as sitting back, thinking about a topic, thinking about the various aspects that are relevant, and those which are not, trying to inspect the evidence, learn something new, and express that in the form of a reasoned blog post.

So, getting back to Java Magazine: it attempts exactly that type of stepping back from the information blur, looking at what's happening from an above-the-fray viewpoint, seeing the broader strokes of what's happening, and analyzing or portraying a view of the significance of it all. I think O'Reilly Radar has a similar objective, though across a broader technology spectrum.

If you're a professional, or a beginner, and you'd like to take a look at what's happening in the Java/JVM universe in the same way you might pick up your Kindle or Nook or iPad, sit back on a couch, relax, and find out what all the fuss is over The Tiger's Wife: A Novel -- if Java and programming technology are your "cup of tea" as opposed to fiction, relaxing as you browseJava Magazine on a Sunday afternoon is something you should consider.

What's in the first issue? I'll duplicate the Table of Contents, so you can see in broad strokes what you'll get if you subscribe.

  • COMMUNITY
  • JAVA IN ACTION
  • JAVA TECH

To me, that's an impressive, broad, relevant set of topics. It's not news that will be relevant only for the next couple hours. It's a presentation of topics that Java/JVM developers on all platforms need to be thinking about as they move their projects--and their careers--forward at this point in technology history.

So, yes, it's Sunday, it's afternoon in Europe and Africa as I write this, it will be afternoon in the Americas soon -- grab a Java Magazine subscription, sit back, put on the the 2014 World Cup draw, or the Red Sox (what I'll be doing), and start perusing. And for my friends for whom it's already Monday, when you have a break and a chance to relax, consider doing something similar.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Harold Carr and Cay Horstmann have posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "When do you expect Java 7 enhancements to become part of your code base?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 5.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Java Innovation 2011 Awards Call for Nominations:

Submit your entry for new Java Innovation 2011 awards and get promoted at the world's biggest Java technology event, the JavaOne conference. Following in the tradition of Duke's Choice Awards, these awards celebrate extreme innovation in the world of Java technology and are granted to the best and most innovative projects using the Java platform. Nomination deadline: Friday, July 29, 2011...

Also featured since my last blog post was Markus Eisele's Priorities, Java, Community and Oracle - Cracking the Code:

OSCON 2011is going on at the moment. One of the conferences I would have loved to visit. This did not work out this year, but today I stumbled upon a video of Steven G. Harris Java Keynote there. The title is a theme we had back in the days of the beginning merger...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

We've just published a new article by Nadine McKenzietitled Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows. Facelets is a java.net project that resides within the GlassFish realm.

Nadine must have a cat or two, and she also clearly enjoys word-play, because she begins her article with:

Facelets offers a powerful way to organize and streamline JSF development. When a cat is thrust into the air, it magically lands upright and safely on its feet. Sadly, this is not always the case with software especially when tinctured with aggressive timelines and insufficient requirements. Facelets is to JSF what the magic is to the cat and can help avoid a CAT-astrophe.

It's a good analogy. If only we, as developers, were given adequate time to actually program the best solution -- so many future problems would be eliminated! Unfortunately, as Nadine says, we generally don't enjoy that freedom.

In the article, Nadine shows how Facelets can come to the rescue for JSF developers, providing three must-knows that will assist you in developing JSF applications more efficiently, so you can more easily meet those aggressive timelines. The three must-knows show you how to:

  • Leverage ui:decorate
  • Simplify Form Field Validation
  • Get Form Fields Under Control with ui:include

Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows is chock-full of code examples, with figures that show the result -- just the thing you need if you want to get started with a Facelets project of your own.

In conclusion, Nadine says:

Facelets is replete with features that speed up development. To discover other interesting features please visit http://facelets.java.net/nonav/docs/dev/docbook.html.

java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post (though it was just two days ago), lots of people have posted interesting new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "When do you expect Java 7 enhancements to become part of your code base?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 5.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the insideHPC announcement of their Live Stream

Leading up to the Java 7 launch (end of this month), java.net has been running Java 7 related polls. The first poll, which ended this past Friday, asked What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future? The poll drew 84 votes and 6 comments. Here are the results:

What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?

  • 7% (6 votes) - It makes Java the clear first choice among mainstream languages
  • 40% (34 votes) - Java will continue as a leading language
  • 31% (26 votes) - It keeps Java viable for now, but Java 8 is really needed
  • 11% (9 votes) - No impact: Java 7 is too little, too late
  • 10% (8 votes) - I don't know
  • 1% (1 votes) - Other

Considering programming languages in general, almost all of them expand with respect to new features early in their course of development. A question is: is continued expansion of a language always required? To more than a few, Java had become "bloated" by the time we reached Java 5.

Some languages basically stop changing at some point, yet remain widely used, due to their suitability for specific roles and applications. Languages like C and Fortran come to mind.

With Java, it seems like few would consider it a satisfactory situation if the language just became fixed in a certain state -- especially not the end-of-Sun state. Historically, there has always been momentum for new enhancements to Java. In the case of Java EE, the recent momentum was in multiple directions: a capability for much greater simplicity (i.e., "bloat" elimination, thereby facilitating -- or, re-facilitating? -- the development of fast, lightweight, highly scalable Java EE components); there was also momentum toward tunability (through the new profiles capability), with the result that Java EE can be more compactly applied to address differing engineering needs. So, with Java EE 6, Java EE expanded, yet it "shrinks" as it is applied to specific objectives.

So, looking again at this (unscientific) poll's results: what's the consensus? I'd say most people who voted think Java must continue developing, moving forward; that Java 7 is a good step in the right direction; that Java 8 is a bigger step in the right direction.

The comments included some well-expressed contrary views. For example, jwenting considers Java 7 a:

massive list of me2! features trying to turn Java into Ruby#++ aren't going to do anything to increase Java's massive market share. If anything, it will hurt the status of Java in the professional market... For serious development work, 1.5 was the end of the line. A 1.6 JVM running 1.5 code can give a bit more performance and stability on 64 bit systems, but that's about it. The only reason most professional teams moved away from 1.4 was that it went end of life, but most still code to 1.4 standards...

xylifyx cited the fact that:

We still don't have a expected release date for the mac version of Java 7 or JavaFX, until then Java 7 is not write once run everywhere. Write once run everywhere is probably Javas main advantage over competitors.

New (current) poll: when you'll use Java 7

Our current java.net poll asks "When do you expect Java 7 enhancements to become part of your code base?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 5.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, the following new java.net blogs were posted:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the announcement New Java 7 Summit To Be Held at EclipseCon Europe:

The Eclipse Foundation, in collaboration with Oracle, is pleased to announce the Java 7 Summit, to be held at the upcoming EclipseCon Europe in Ludwigsburg, Germany on November 2-4, 2011. The Java 7 Summit offers Java developers and architects an opportunity to gain in-depth technical education on the new innovations...

Our previous Spotlight was Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine's Aquarium post JavaOne 2011 Content revealed & Duke Choice Awards Nominations!:

The JavaOne 2011 event catalog is now available with keynotes, sessions, hands-on-labs, BOFs, panels and user-group meetings is now available. While the schedule is not quite ready yet, this should give you a detailed view at this year's content which we hope is rated as good as last year's...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The first OSCON Javatakes place next week, Monday through Wednesday. Browsing the full schedule indicates to me that the conference has every likelihood of becoming an enduring part of OSCON -- provided enough people have signed up to attend. I hope the attendance is great (the program deserves that); unfortunately I won't be there myself to cover it in person this time.

The program itself is very impressive. If I was there, I'd surely want to attend sessions like:

and many others (my typical problem at conferences is conflicts where at a single time there are several sessions I want to attend). Oh, and the above list includes only sessions that take place on Monday. OSCON Java has two more days to go beyond that!

I hope to attend OSCON Java next year. But this year, java.net still will be represented at the conference: java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry is attending both OSCON Java and the main OSCON conference. So, if you look, you may see her in the OSCON Java hallway or session rooms. She'll also be presenting as part of the OSCON Community track on Friday at 10:00 AM: Lessons from the Java.net Migration: Managing an Open Source Community through Major Change. If you're signed up for the full OSCON, consider attending Sonya's session!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Fabrizio Giudici posted two new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?"Voting will be open until Friday, July 22.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:

After writing about the Egyptian JUG's Java 7 Celebration (which took place as large but peaceful protests were happening across Egypt), I invited JUG leaders to point us to photos of their Java 7 Launch events. So far, the response has been great! Below are selected pictures from Java 7 events in South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

PBJUG, Jo

On the OpenJDK's Discuss mailing list this past Thursday, SAP's Volker Simonis posted a message titled "SAP Joins the OpenJDK." Going into the details of what has actually happened, Volker explained:

I'm really happy that as of today, SAP has signed the Oracle Contributor Agreement (OCA). This means that with immediate effect the SAP JVM developers can officially join the discussions on the various OpenJDK mailing lists and contribute patches and enhancements to the project.

Volker noted that SAP has been a Java source licensee for a very long time, and that they've previously ported the Sun/Oracle JDK to all 14 hardware/OS platforms that SAP supports. Volker concludes with:

I'm sure this move will be fruitful and beneficial for both, the OpenJDK community as well as SAP. Looking forward to working with you.

java.net Weblogs

After my last blog post, java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry posted a new java.net blog:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?"Voting will be open until Friday, July 22.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Java Innovation 2011 Awards Call for Nominations:

Submit your entry for new Java Innovation 2011 awards and get promoted at the world's biggest Java technology event, the JavaOne conference. Following in the tradition of Duke's Choice Awards, these awards celebrate extreme innovation in the world of Java technology and are granted to the best and most innovative projects using the Java platform. Nomination deadline: Friday, July 29, 2011...

Prior to that, we spotlighted the Java 7 Celebration Webcast:

Oracle is committed to Java: the technology, the community, the Java Community Process (JCP), and the entire ecosystem focused on moving Java forward. Watch this Webcast to find out more about the features of Java 7, hear from technologists at companies that use Java technology, and learn through a series of technical presentations and a panel discussion...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

On a day when hundreds of thousands of protesters and activists filled Tahrir Square and other city squares across Egypt, the Egyptian Java User Group held itsJava 7 launch event. From 11:00 AM through 5 PM on Saturday, July 9, approximately 600 developers and students participated in sessions and celebrations centered on Java 7, at American University of Cairo.

Oracle technology evangelist Simon Ritter travelled to Cairo despite the renewed protesting, and presented a keynote session titled "Java SE 7: The Java Language Evolves"; then, later on, he presented sessions on the Garbage Collector and JavaFX. EGJUG leader and Java Champion Ahmed Hashim and Ahmed Aly gave a talk about JUG-Africa and the JCP.

Ahmed posted lots of pictures of the event on the EGJUG's Facebook page. He said 1500 people registered for the event. Among the 600 or so who attended the event, Ahmed estimates that about 50-60% were students, the remainder professional developers.

For those of us who live in places where the streets are generally calm, the question of whether to attend developer events is merely one of "do I feel like attending?" We can only hope that someday soon, it won't be necessary for such decisions to include an assessment of safety and risk for members of the Egyptian JUG (likewise, for developers in other troubled nations).


Demonstrators rally in Cairo's Tahrir square [image from a story in The Australian]

Thanks again to Ahmed Hashim for founding and leading the EGJUG, and to all EGJUG members for building a vibrant organization that keeps moving forward despite the current tumult in Egypt. Thanks also to Simon Ritter for making the trip to Cairo, despite the fact that new major protests were suddenly erupting across Egypt. And thanks to Oracle for promoting and supporting Java 7 launch events and Java User Groups across the globe.


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?"Voting will be open until Friday, July 22.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Rakesh Tembhurne's post, 7 Reasons Why Should You Join and Actively Participate In JUG Nagpur (which really applies to every JUG):

Yesterday, I attended Java 7 launch party by Java User Group Nagpur. As it was my first User Group event, when I entered, I was just a curious guy. But as the event came to an end, we all understood how important this group is for both who are learning as well as expert in Java related technologies...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Java User Group Community Leader John Yeary recently announced the graduations of two Java User Groups from the java.net project incubator: JUG Cergy (France) and Sibiu JUG (Romania).

Cergy, France is a suburb about 28 km to the northwest of Paris. In his announcement, John specifically congratulated Kaesar Alnijres "for successfully completing the requirements for graduation from the incubator." In its home page on java.net, the JUG says it is aiming to have its first meeting or event in either July or early September.

Sibiu is a beautiful old city in central Romania (ranked 8th in the Forbes Magazine list of Europe's most idyllic place to live). In his announcement, John congratulated Cojocaru Euge for completing the incubator graduation requirements. Sibiu JUG recently held their first meeting, and their next one will be on August 1. You can visit the Sibiu JUG home page on java.net.

Congratulations to JUG Cergy and the Sibiu JUG!


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?"Voting will be open until Friday, July 22.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Tori Wieldt's post, Java 7 Celebration Begins:

It was a glorious global gathering of the Java community today (on July 7), when Oracle hosted multiple events and a Webcast to celebrate Java 7. With contributions from Java users around the world, Java 7 is a testament to the vibrancy of the Java community and to Oracle

While Thursday's Java 7 Celebration Webcast, broadcast from Oracle's offices in Redwood Shores, California, was the signature Java 7 event that took place on 7/7/11, Java was also receiving significant attention at another location not too far up the California coast. On that day, the O'Reilly Radar site featured three new Java-related posts by Ed Dumbill:

Add to this James Turner's recent interview with Stuart Sierra about Clojure (Clojure: Lisp meets Java, with a side of Erlang) and this month's OSCON Java Conference (check out Why OSCON Java? by Mike Loukides) -- and it's quite clear that there is an upswell in the the energy Tim O'Reilly and his crew are devoting to Java these days.

Of course, it can't be claimed that O'Reilly ever stopped covering Java. Java.net itself was the joint creation of O'Reilly and Sun. And as late as May of last year, my java.net editorship contract was with O'Reilly. As with many things, the java.net boat rocked a bit when Oracle acquired Sun -- java.net is no longer formally associated with O'Reilly -- but, without O'Reilly, I doubt there ever would have been a java.net that functions both as a Java community entity and gathering place, and as a provider of infrastructure for Java open source projects.

The new Java-centric energy emanating from O'Reilly should be readily apparent to anyone who follows O'Reilly, via Radar and the company's other endeavors. So, why is this happening? And why now?

If you look at the banner that heads all Radar pages, you'll see this description of what O'Reilly Radar is about, what it intends to provide:

 

Insight, analysis, and research about emerging technologies

So now, the question becomes: does the fact that O'Reilly is giving renewed and significant attention to Java mean that they consider today's Java, and where Java is headed, to be representative of an emergent technology? Where the legacy foundation technology was Java as it existed several years ago, when progress in the language ground to a near halt due to Sun's collapse? Do Java 7 (and moreso Java 8 -- see our latest java.net poll), Java EE 6 and 7, the new JVM languages, platforms like Groovy and NetBeans and Android, projects like GlassFish, Hudson/Jenkins, the global growth of local Java communities as represented by Java User Groups and a host of new, smaller, local conferences and gatherings... Does all this put together represent a Java that is today a genuinely emergent technology?

Another O'Reilly person, Mike Hendrickson, analyzing the 2010 State of the Computer Book Market, Post 4 - The Languages, noted:

Java experienced the biggest gain in units, at 28,633 more units in 2010 than 2009... In 2008, we reported that C# surpassed Java as the number one language. But hold on, Java proved to be resilient in 2009 and experienced a resurgence in 2010 and is now the number one language from a book sales perspective.

[Note: in the chart above, that tallest bar is Java, with C#, Objective C, and Javascript being the next best sellers. Here's afully readable, expanded view.]

In other words, the data from O'Reilly's own core business (producing and selling computer books) told them that, even through the uncertainty of the Sun acquisition, Java was holding its own among developers who buy books; and that 2010, the year when Java's future (including if it realistically had one) became clearer, saw a resurgence in developer interest in Java. And book sales, I think, are indeed a good indicator, since that's a "vote" that is registered using financial currency.

So, in conclusion (though, really, having written this, it feels like my thinking in this direction has just begun) -- anyway, from where we stand now, where we're headed: does everything that's new in today's Java make it an emerging technology? The folks at O'Reilly, who've historically done a pretty good job of sensing where technology is heading (their radar has been typically sharp), seem to think so.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry and Frans Thamura posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What impact will Java 7 ultimately have on Java's future?"Voting will be open until Friday, July 22.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Tori Wieldt's post, Java 7 Celebration Begins:

It was a glorious global gathering of the Java community today (on July 7), when Oracle hosted multiple events and a Webcast to celebrate Java 7. With contributions from Java users around the world, Java 7 is a testament to the vibrancy of the Java community and to Oracle’s ongoing commitment to the language and technology...

We're also featuring Java Spotlight Episode 37: Michelle Kovac on the Java 7 Launch:

Interview with Michelle Kovac, Java Brand Manager, on the Java 7 Launch and surrounding events...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

Java User Groups around the world are preparing to celebrate the Java 7 launch this week and in the coming weeks as well. Oracle is sponsoring a global event on Thursday, July 7, a 4.5 hour mini-conference that will be broadcast live on the Web: Introducing Java 7 Webcast: Moving Java Forward.

But the live celebration won't only be happening in Oracle's offices. A great many Java User Groups have major events planned, centered on the Java 7 launch.

For example, the Tampa Java User Group has also scheduled a July 2011 Special Meeting - Java 7 Launch Event on 7/7. Jim Clarke, from Oracle, will be speaking.

Atul Palandurkar says that JUG Nagpur will hold a Java 7 Launch event on Sunday, July 10.

The Jozi Java User Groupis holding a five hour Java 7 Launch Party on Thursday. The Aquarium's Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine will be on hand to participate in the festivities (he'll also talk about Java 7, Java EE 7, and the future of Java).

http://www.egjug.org/files/eg-jug-2.pngThe hours available on July 7 were insufficient for the Java 7 celebration the Egyptian Java User Group has planned. Ahmed Ali says EGJUG (and Oracle):

decided to hold a launching event on the 9th of July 2011 (to make sure you have no excuse) so what are you waiting for? Come and join our full day event, full of technical goodies, sessions introducing what's new in Java 7 and also security enhancements in Java 7, hey wait a minute that's not all there will be a tremendous giveaways (books, licenses ...) and much more

Many other African JUGs will also be celebrating the Java 7 launch, as noted in the JUG-AFRICA and Java 7 launch event posted on the java.net Events calendar. Events will be held by the TogoJUG, FasoJUG, SeneJUG, CongoJUG, and more.

The SeneJUG home pagefeatures a clock that is counting down the time until the start of their event (see snapshot on the left).

Many JUGs have announced their Java 7 launch events on the JUG Events site:

http://www.oracle.com/ocom/groups/public/@otn/documents/digitalasset/423371.jpgIf you haven't noticed, Duke is really excited about the upcoming release of Java 7 -- so much so, that he's sporting a new, snazzy outfit, and keeps jumping up and down, unable to contain his excitement. The ilovejava Facebook pageexplains: "Java is moving forward, and so is Duke!"

The release of Java 7 is of course an incredibly big moment for Java. Thinking back, there was plenty of time when many wondered if there would ever be a Java 7 release -- the future of Java was so unclear as Sun slid into demise. And, while perhaps we could say that there was a kind of skimming low over the treetops for a while, the Java plane indeed did not crash land; and today, it's clearly gaining altitude once again, under Oracle's stewardship. The promotional slogan happens to be true: Java is indeed moving forward today.

As part of the promotional side of things, a 3D animated screen saver featuring the new, enhanced Duke is being offered to anyone who'd like it. Versions for Mac, Linux, and Windows are available.

While Java 7 won't formally be released until later this month, a global Java 7 introduction will be taking place this Thursday, July 7 - a 4 1/2 hour live event, that will also be broadcast online as the Introducing Java 7 Webcast: Moving Java Forward. If you'll be in the Redwood Shores, CA, USA area, you can register for the live celebration. Otherwise, consider watching the live web cast.

Another way to participate is submit Java 7 questions for the panel Q & A segment of the event. You can submit questions by posting a comment to Tori Wieldt's Future Tech Duke blog post, or you can tweet questions on Twitter, tagging your tweet with#java 7.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been several significant java.net blogs composed by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "What's your view of the addition of Sonatype's Nexus Maven repository manager to the java.net project stack?" Voting will be open until Friday, July 8.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Michael Huettermann's Agile Application Lifecycle Management (ALM).


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Introducing Java 7 Webcast: Moving Java Forward:

Step Forward and Celebrate! As a member of the Java community, you played a critical role in building Java 7. You contributed great ideas for new features and new ways of working and collaborating to take the next step in development. And now, it's time to celebrate with a global gathering of the Java community

Filter Blog

By date: