Skip navigation

Deepak Vohra has a new article on the Oracle Technology Network,"Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets". This article comes on the heels of the latest java.net article, Nadine McKenzie's "Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows". So, why Facelets, and why now? If you're not familiar with Facelets, perhaps now is a good time to introduce yourself to the technology.

Facelets is an open source project hosted on java.net. The project is a GlassFish sub-project. Facelets is also a component of JavaServer Faces, which is implemented by the Mojarra project on java.net.

"That's fine," you say. "But what can I do with Facelets?"

Good question! The introduction on the Facelets home page provides the rationale behind Facelets and an overview of its capabilities:

The web community is eagerly seeking a framework like Tapestry, backed by JavaServer Faces as the industry standard. While JavaServer Faces and JSP are meant to be aligned,Facelets steps outside of the JSP spec and provides a highly performant, JSF-centric view technology. Anyone who has created a JSP page will be able to do the same with Facelets. The difference is under the hood where all the burden of the JSP Vendor API is removed to more greatly enhance JSF performance and provide easy plug-and-go development.

The Facelets Developer Documentation, which subtitles Facelets as being the "JavaServer Faces View Definition Framework," is the place to go for complete details on the technology.

http://today.java.net/sites/default/files/example5.png
Example Facelets web app from Nadine McKenzie's "Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows."

Deepak's and Nadine's articles provide a good tutorial-style introduction to what's in Facelets, and how to use it to create web pages and services. Both articles have plenty of code with accompanying figures the show what the code produces in your browser.


Example Facelets web app from Deepak Vohra's "Templating with JSF 2.0 Facelets."

If you'd like to get more involved in the Facelets open source project, consider subscribing to one or more of the mailing lists (or theMojarra mailing lists) -- or join the Facelets project.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted interesting newjava.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How interested are you in JCP.next, the effort to create the next Java Community Process?" Voting will be open until Friday, September 2.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JavaOne Blog post JavaOne Discover Plus and Discover Pass: Move Forward on a Tight Schedule -

If you have more curiosity and ambition than time, here’s the solution: The JavaOne Discover Plus and Discover Passes. The Discover Plus Pass?Only US$895* Get these exclusive benefits, PLUS all Discover Pass benefits listed below: * Attend any three technical sessions...

Our previous Spotlight was the NetBeans IDE 7 Satisfaction Survey -

Welcome NetBeans User! The NetBeans team is interested in feedback about your experience using NetBeans IDE 7.0 or its update release, NetBeans IDE 7.0.1. With each NetBeans release, we strive to deliver an IDE that gives you the best coding experience available. Your survey responses will let us know if we are on target, and also alert us to features or enhancements to consider for future releases. Please take a moment to answer the questions below...

Before that, we featured the JavaOne Blog post JavaOne 2011 Schedule Builder is LIVE! -

JavaOne Schedule Builder is live at last!  Don’t get shut out – go to Schedule Builder NOW to reserve your space in the must-attend sessions on your list.  See recommendations for sessions that might be of interest to you, find the partners you want to hear and the demos you want to see...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

Last week, Sonatype announced that java.net projects are now included in the Sonatype Central Repository. The press release states:

Java.net project owners can now easily automate and control synchronization of their Java.net project artifacts to the Central Repository. This allows other developers to locate and download the appropriate artifacts from Java.net projects via Apache Maven. As a result, any Maven project can now leverage Java.net project assets more easily to deliver applications faster, at a higher quality, and with less risk.

Sonatype founder and CTO Jason Van Zyl put it this way:

"Before the migration work done by Sonatype and Oracle, developers would often have to create workarounds and advanced configurations to consume important Java components housed at Java.net. Developers now have access to Java.net components directly from the Central Repository, requiring no debugging or additional configurations. Enterprise development teams will see faster builds, fewer integration problems and improved control of software component usage."

Some interesting information about the Central Repository:

The Central Repository is accessed by developers nearly four billion times per year making it one of the most visited services on the Web today. The addition of Java.net software components to the Central Repository significantly extends its coverage and reinforces its key role in the software development landscape. Since its creation in 2001, the Central Repository usage by open-source projects has accelerated dramatically with coverage expected to exceed 90 percent by the end of 2011. Popular software development infrastructure products such as NetBeans, Oracle JDeveloper, Eclipse, Apache Maven, Apache Ant, Gradle and Nexus use the Central Repository for access to Java components.

This is one more way that java.net is getting better. It's been, and is, a long journey, but the direction is clearly positive: as a site for supporting open source JVM-based projects, java.net net is improving step by step.

For additional commentary on the incorporation of java.net projects into the Sonatype Central Repository, see the Sonatype Blog entry and the Dr.Dobb's article.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, many bloggers have posted interesting new java.net blog posts:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "How interested are you in JCP.next, the effort to create the next Java Community Process?" Voting will be open until Friday, September 2.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:

http://java.net/attachments/wiki_images/jsr348/JCP-process-tiny.jpgJSR 348 (Towards a new version of the Java Community Process) has a new public home on java.net, the JSR 348 (JCP.next) project. In his recent blog post, "Using the Process to change the Process", JCP Chair Patrick Curran invites the Java community's participation in JSR 348 and the JCP.next project:

We want your input, particularly now, during the Public Review period. Please visit us on java.net where you can learn how to participate. Subscribe to the Observers alias, review our issues, browse our meeting minutes, download the drafts of our new documents, and provide your feedback through the Issue Tracker. See you there!

The JSR 348 JCP.next project on java.net is a subproject of thejsrs project, which itself is a subproject of the top level jcp project on java.net.

It makes a lot of sense for JSR 348 to be the first JSR that has a full presence on java.net. As the project introduction states:

Since one of the main themes of JSR 348 is transparency, and since it will require that future JSRs be run in a transparent manner, the Expert Group has committed to running this JSR according to those requirements.

We will therefore discuss our business in public, publish all of our working materials and meeting minutes, and track issues in the open.

Interested members of the community are invited to join the JCP.next Observers mailing list, engage in public discussions on the new JSR 348 forum, and review documents from the JSR 348 Document Archive. There's also a JSR 348 JIRA issue trackerwhere you can record or comment on issues and track their progress.

If you're interested in participating in, or following, the creation of the next edition of the Java Community Process, joining the java.net JSR 348 (JCP.next) project is a great way to get started.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Otavio Santana began a new java.net blog post series on Java 7:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Have you tried out Java 7 yet?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 19.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is JCP Chair Patrick Curran's Using the Process to change the Process:

There are two documents that define how the JCP is organized and how it does its work: the Java Specification Participation Agreement (JSPA), which is a legal contract between members and Oracle, addressing Intellectual Property grants and the terms under which the Spec, RI, and TCK should be licensed, and the Process Document, which defines...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

When poll results look something like a Normal Distribution, or a Poisson Distribution, I feel like I did a good job selecting the poll's response options. This was the case for our recently completed poll on Java 7 integration into existing code bases.

The voting total was 60 votes; and two comments were posted as well. The exact poll question and results were:

When do you expect Java 7 enhancements to become part of your code base?

  • 17% (10 votes) - Within weeks
  • 27% (16 votes) - In a few months
  • 30% (18 votes) - Sometime in 2012
  • 18% (11 votes) - Years from now
  • 0% (0 votes) - Never
  • 8% (5 votes) - I don't know

In a sense, this is exactly what I'd expect. Some projects have been waiting for specific new features that are implemented in Java 7. The delay in the Java 7 release forced them to make difficult choices between: 1) writing, testing, and verifying round-about methods of accomplishing promised enhancements; 2) waiting for Java 7, which provides language enhancements that significantly simplify the work required to develop those promised enhancements. These developers will be bringing Java 7 into their code base almost immediately, to satisfy the customers without creating code that will be more difficult to maintain and adapt in the future.

At the other extreme are projects where high reliability is critical. These developers don't expect to bring Java 7's new features into their code base until years from now. The comment posted by pjmlp describes this situation well:

My current project, which I started last month, is the first where I am allowed to use Java 6 on the job. In many projects we are now moving to Java 1.5! So I expect many moons to go by before we are allowed to come near to Java 7 on our daily projects.

gwvantreese is in a similar situation:

I won't be using Java 7 until my company migrates to a version of Weblogic or JBoss that uses Java 7. We won't upgrade to any new Java 7 version of Weblogic or JBoss until some time after they are generally available and stable and the migration fits in with our own internal update cycles. So it will probably be quite some time until I am actively using Java 7.

So, does that mean that the Java 7 release is useless forpjmlp, gwvantreese, and kindred developers? Not at all! The formal release of Java 7 provides architects with greater ability to assess the level of effort that will ultimately be required for future enhancements on the radar screen. This enables the financial assessors at companies to better evaluate which customer-requested enhancements should receive higher priority. The future, for these companies and developers, is clarified, now that Java 7 has actually been released. That's a good thing!

I was a bit surprised that no one said that "Never" was when they expected Java 7 enhancements to become part of their code base. Not that that's a realistic response for anyone who has a long-term point of view. But I thought that perhaps a few people who consider Java 1.5 to be the pinnacle edition of Java might express their displeasure with what's happened since by selecting that. But, no takers!

New poll: Have you tried out Java 7?

Our current java.net poll asks "Have you tried out Java 7 yet?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 19. 

java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, other people have posted several interesting new java.net blogs:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Dalibor Topic's OpenJDK post, A bug's life:

The JDK 7 Updates Project in OpenJDK is now up and running. We've spent some time in the past couple of weeks discussing processes, finalized them, and started accepting changes destined for JDK 7 Update releases. Changes going into a JDK 7 Update are typically bug fixes, coming to JDK 7 Updates through JDK 8...

Our previous Spotlight was John Yeary's Book Review: Java: The Good Parts:

I had an opportunity to read Java: The Good Parts by Jim Waldo which was included in my Java 7 Launch Party Kit. I was not sure what to expect from the book. I was pleasantly surprised to discover it is a really good book. There are a number of great quotes in the book...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Following up on my post about Java 7 launch events hosted by Java User Groups around the world, here are pictures and news from additional events, this time from three continents.

Uganda

We start our journey in Uganda on July 8, where Richard Zulu reports "We had a good attendance and new faces, which was an indication of the developers love for Java." Duke Daniel Odongo posted a gallery of photos from the event.

JUG Nagpur, Nagpur, India

Two days later and 5000 km to the east, JUG Nagpur (India) held their Java 7 launch event. Tushar Joshi posted a picture album.

FASOJUG, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

Six days later (July 16) and 8000 km to the West (back to Africa) one of the newest Java User Groups in the world, FASOJUG, held its Java 7 launch celebration in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Thanks to FASOJUG co-founder Drabo Constantin for reporting on the event.

Estonia

5500 km to the North, on the day Java SE 7 was formally released (July 28), Estonians held their celebration. Anton Arhipov captured the event in a picture album.

ICEJUG, Iceland
Possibly simultaneously (a mere 2000 km to the West), Iceland's ICEJUG celebrated the Java 7 release. Reynir Huebner reports that while "there were not as many attendees as I wanted, but lot of people are gone away on summer vacation. Still a nice crowd attended, everyone got a t-shirt and I gave the Java7 talk - in Icelandic of course, and it was very well received. We had a good Q&A session, and I feel people here are excited to start using JSE7."

Bangalore Open Java User Group (BOJUG), Bangalore, India
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-vM6PcbzvC5I/TjWZv_vNInI/AAAAAAAAE54/bVA-idr4wRM/s512/SDC10242.JPG

This edition of our Java 7 release celebration journey ends 9000 km to the South-East and three days later, back in India, with the Bangalore Open Java User Group's event. Thanks to Ranganath.S for capturing the event in photos.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, a couple new java.net blogs have been posted:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Have you tried out Java 7 yet?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 19.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the announcement NetBeans IDE 7.0.1 Now Available for Download:

The NetBeans Team has released NetBeans IDE 7.0.1, with full support for the official release of the Java SE 7 platform. An update to NetBeans IDE 7.0, this release includes the following notable changes: Full JDK 7 support...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

It's becoming clear that if you didn't attend OSCON Java, you missed something special. In his post OSCON Java Makes a Difference, Stephen Chin called it "one of the greatest Java events since the collapse of Sun." On OSCON Java Day 2, JavaWorld's Athen OShea opened a blog post with: "O'Reilly's OSCON Java in summary so far: Good crowd, high quality sessions, and an unbeatable rock star to attendee ratio." That same day, java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry said:

I have to say I'm pretty impressed with the show so far. It's always difficult to kick off a new conference, but I think O'Reilly nailed it.

The great majority of us, of course, didn't attend OSCON Java. But that doesn't have to stop us from experiencing some of the key events that took place there. In addition to the blog posts I quoted above, Tori Wieldt posted OSCON Java: Already Great just before the conference began, discussing the weekend events that preceded the conference, and providing quotes overheard at the OSCON Java Speakers Dinner. After the conference ended, Arun Gupta, a conference speaker, published his OSCONJ 2011 Trip Report.

Harold Carrprovides a day-by-day depiction of his week at OSCON (including OSCON Java) in a five-post series:



 

Moving on to videos, O'Reilly created an OSCON 2011 playlist on YouTube, that includes (as I write this) nine videos from OSCON Java:

InsideHPC has also published a video recorded at OSCON Java, Interview: Martin Odersky on Scala.

OSCON Java presentations are beginning to show up on the OSCON 2011 Speaker Slides & Video site. Toby Crawley has separately published his OSCON Java TorqueBox Presentation slides.

Finally, if 140-characters is all you can digest at a sitting, there's the #osconj Twitter feed.

So, even if you weren't able to attend OSCON Java 2011, with all of the above, you can surely occupy yourself for hours experiencing it from afar -- while you start planning your attendance at OSCON Java 2012 (July 16-18, Portland, Oregon, US).


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Fabrizio Giudici posted a new java.net blog:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "When do you expect Java 7 enhancements to become part of your code base?" Voting will be open until Friday, August 5.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Nadine McKenzie's article Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows:

Facelets offers a powerful way to organize and streamline JSF development. When a cat is thrust into the air, it magically lands upright and safely on its feet. Sadly, this is not always the case with software especially when tinctured with aggressive timelines and insufficient requirements. Facelets is to JSF what the magic is to the cat and can help avoid a CAT-astrophe...

Our previous Spotlight was the announcement, Java SE 7 Has Been Released!:

After nearly five years of collaboration within the worldwide Java community, Java SE 7 has been released and is ready for download! With Project Coin, the new Fork/Framework, the New File System API (NIO.2), and more. Java SE 7 is an important step in Java's evolution. Download Java 7!

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Filter Blog

By date: