Skip navigation

The JavaOne Emerging Languages, Tools, and Techniques track could have had a longer title, given the variety that exists in the 100 sessions that have been grouped into the track. Visit the JavaOne Content Catalog and select "Emerging Languages, Tools, and Techniques" in the "Tracks" pull-down to see what I mean.

The key word for this track is "Emerging" -- it's about efforts that are happening right now that look to the future, but aren't yet well established within the Java ecosystem. Hence, it's a very broad category, since at any given point in time, lots of new ideas are being worked on by lots of people. But, at the same time, looking at the sessions grouped into this track, you'd think that this track was used a bit as a kind of catch-all. All that means is that whatever your primary JavaOne interest is, you may want to take a look at the "Emerging" track sessions list, to make sure you don't miss something you'll later wish you had attended.

For example, there's Java Champion Kirk Pepperdine's session "Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You?" (Tuesday, 5:30 PM). That's a pretty critical topic, when you're talking about operational software within a Data Center, or client software that connects to a Data Center, or desktop software that a company sells. Kirk describes his session as follows:

If you wanna know what your garbage collector is up to, the best place to look is in the GC logs. Using the right set of switches, you can get information critical to the proper tuning of your JVM while incurring minimal overhead. For example, many applications are starved for memory in at least one of their internal memory pools. GC logs will tell you about these starvation conditions, and with a few calculations, you can do the necessary reconfiguration. But it's not only starvation that can be a problem. Having too much memory can be equally problematic. Or your problem may be as simple as your application's calling System.gc(). All this information can be found in the GC logs -- but only if you learn how to listen to what the logs are telling you.

So, among the available JavaOne tracks, where would you put Kirk's session? It's a practical look at situations Java developers face every day. I expect it will be very well attended. It turns out that Kirk's session is listed in both the Core Java Platform track, and in the Emerging Languages, Tools, and Techniques track. This makes sense.

It also points out once more how difficult it is for people who are attending JavaOne to actually construct a schedule of sessions they'll attend. I've made a schedule, finding many more sessions I wish I could attend than can possibly fit into the available time. And, now I'm realizing that I'll have to pare back the schedule I've made -- else, I won't be able to do any blogging about what I'm seeing at the conference!

So, what else will you find in the "Emerging" track? Everything from Java Benchmarking to the cloud, Mylyn and Hudson, low-level Hotspot flags, Java User Groups, OpenEJB, Java startup performance, the JCP, Netbeans, OSGi, API design, JRuby, Gradle... the list goes on!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Jim Wright and Ed Burns have both posted two new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks How long into the future will developers be writing new apps using Java? Voting will be open until September 30.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Adam Bien's new article Integration Testing for Java EE:

Unit tests are fast and fine-grained. Integration tests are slow and coarse-grained. Instead of using arbitrary categorizations for unit and integration tests, such as

Our recent poll indicates that the JavaOne "Java SE, Client Side Technologies, and Rich User Experiences" track interests many developers who will be attending JavaOne or following it from afar. In this post, I take a look at JavaOne's Java desktop content.

If you're attending JavaOne, you've probably looked at the schedule and found yourself disappointed that you can't be in two or three or four places simultaneously. That's been my experience, as I've used the JavaOne Schedule Builder. Turns out that, looking solely at the client side track, the problem of wishing you could be in multiple places simultaneously isn't much mitigated! A total of 94 sessions are in this track -- and, no, you can't fit 94 sessions into a mere four days -- hence, the times for the sessions overlap, and overlap, and overlap...

The client-side sessions cover JavaFX 2.0, Swing, animation, GWT, JAX-RS 2.0, JSR 321 (Trusted Computing), collections, Alice, Griffon and Groovy, GroovyFX, the JDK 7 desktop, FXML, visualization of geomaps, and more. But the core focus is JavaFX.

Right now, I'm planning on attending James Weaver's "The Return of Rich-Client Java":

JavaFX 2.0 and Java application deployment technologies are enabling the return of rich-client Java. This session brings the attendees up to speed on the JavaFX 2.0 API and best practices for developing rich-client applications with it. It also presents application deployment strategies that are palatable to users who expect applications to be available from Web pages. Along the way, it also explores best practices for coding JavaFX applications, including property binding capabilities and a declarative programming style.

The complete list of JavaOne sessions is available in the JavaOne Content Catalog. If you won't be attending JavaOne, and there is a specific session you wish you could attend, let me know what it is, and, if I can, I'll attend it on your behalf, and blog about it. I'm overjoyed to have a full conference pass this year, and I'd like to use it to the benefit of the java.net and broader Java community.


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks How long into the future will developers be writing new apps using Java? Voting will be open until September 30.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Terrence Barr's JavaOne preview, JavaOne 2011: The Mobile & Embedded Show Guide, Part 1:

Less than two weeks to JavaOne 2011 in San Francisco … High time for my annual and (admittedly quite subjective) “Mobile & Embedded Show Guide”. Here it goes, part 1 (of 2): First off, JavaOne 2011 will see a number of changes to address some of the feedback we got last year. JavaOne will be...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The results of the most recently completed java.net poll suggest that almost all of the JavaOne tracks will be well-attended this year. A total of 40 votes were cast in the poll. Here's the exact question and the results:

Which JavaOne 2011 track interests you most (even if you're not attending)?

  • 18% (7 votes) - Core Java Platform
  • 18% (7 votes) - Emerging Languages, Tools, and Technologies
  • 25% (10 votes) - Enterprise Service Architectures and the Cloud
  • 20% (8 votes) - Java EEhttp://home.java.net/poll/how-long-future-will-developers-be-writing-new-apps-using-java Web Profile and Platform Technologies
  • 8% (3 votes) - Java ME, Mobile, Embedded, and Devices
  • 13% (5 votes) - Java SE, Client Side Technologies, and Rich User Experiences
  • 0% (0 votes) - The Java Frontier
  • 0% (0 votes) - I don't know

Certainly, you can say that enterprise-related tracks received more votes, but only "The Java Frontier" received no interest in the poll. I'd guess that the reason "The Java Frontier" received no votes might be related to the global economy? People want to use JavaOne (or would use it if they were attending) to advance their skills in areas that have practical import for the problems they're facing in their jobs today. Is there any place in the world today where work is plentiful?

Anyway, I'm glad to see these results. As I filled out my JavaOne schedule, it was very problemmatic, with too many sessions at each time that I wish I could attend.

I hope many people will blog about their JavaOne experience (though, realistically, tweeting dominates today). I will definitely blog -- though my schedule is such that some of my blogs about individual sessions won't appear until after JavaOne has finished. Happily, I have a very full schedule of sessions! And I intend to tell you what I hear.

New poll: duration of the Java developer career?

Our current poll asks How long into the future will developers be writing new apps using Java? Voting will be open until September 30.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Josh Marinacci's article, "Client-Side Improvements in Java 6 and Java 7":

Since the release of Java Platform, Standard Edition 6 (Java SE 6) in December of 2006, a lot of improvements have been made to the client and desktop parts of Java. In this article, we take a tour of Swing, and then we dive into some of the support technologies that let developers make great client apps, such as installation, Java Web Start, applets, and graphics...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

We've just published a new article by Sanjay Dasgupta, administrator of the java.net VisualLanLab project. The article, titled "VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears", introduces the tool's design, logic, and capabilities.

VisualLangLab is a JavaTools subproject that was started in January 2011. The software facilitates the development of parsers using a visual user interface. As Sanjay states in the article:

Parsing techniques and parser-generator tools are a great addition to any developer's arsenal, and VisualLangLab provides a convenient, gentle introduction to those topics.

The VisualLangLab software is actually coded in Scala, but you needn't have Scala installed on your system in order to run the application: the full download includes all the component Scala libraries you need. All you really need to run VisualLangLab is a 1.6+ JDK or JRE.

Sanjay's article walks you through the steps of using VisualLangLab to define a basic parser for a data stream that has a specific language grammar. Many aspects of the GUI are presented and discussed, along with capabilities such as literal token creation, regex token creation, whitespace and comments management, node management, rule creation, action code, and more.

The VisualLangLab download also provides sample grammars to help you better understand the tool's capabilities and how it works.

Near the end of the article, the relationship between VisualLangLab and Scala's parser combinators is discussed, and illustrated with the following figure:

For more information about this aspect of VisualLangLab, see Relationship with Scala Parser Combinators on the VLL project site, or in the downloadable VLLS.zip.

Summing up, Sanjay says:

The article introduces readers to parser development using the completely visual tool VisualLangLab. Its features make it an effective prototyping environment and a training tool, and will hopefully be a useful addition to any developer's skills.

Read the full article for more details.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, a couple new interesting java.net blogs have been posted by others:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Which JavaOne 2011 track interests you most (even if you're not attending)?" Voting will be open until Friday, September 16.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Episode 47: JavaOne 2011 San Francisco:

Alvina O'Neal, the JavaOne Conference Lead, and Sharat Chander, the JavaOne Program Chair, discuss what attending developers can expect for JavaOne 2011 San Francisco with regards to the programming and logistics for the event. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel is Dalibor Topic...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Two days ago, I looked at the calendar and realized with surprise that I'll be on a plane to San Francisco for JavaOne in just three weeks! Time to start getting ready. Having missed last year's JavaOne, there's lots of catching up I'd like to do with lots of people at JavaOne 2011. I know from past experience that the conference is going to fly by, and I don't want to rely solely on chance for meeting up with people. So, I'd like to arrange in advance times when I'll meet some people for informal chats. As we chat, I'll take notes, and ultimately I'll include it all in a java.net blog.

These really will be informal chats, and they can be about any pertinent topic. The main topic of conversation is your choice -- it can be the recent Java core releases, the broad direction of Java's progress, new JVM languages, open source projects you're working on, active JSRs -- you name it: if you want to talk about it, I'm game for chatting with you.

So, if you're interested in arranging an informal meeting with me at a time and place to be determined at JavaOne, contact me here, or send me (@kevin_farnham) a message on Twitter.

See you at JavaOne 2011!


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, lots of people have posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Which JavaOne 2011 track interests you most (even if you're not attending)?" Voting will be open until Friday, September 16.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Kirk Pepperdine's Performance Puzzler with a stack trace:

This performance puzzler showed up in my inbox and it's kind of interesting and so I asked the owner of this data if I might share it with you all. Here is some background. The JVM is running Tomcat with BlueDragon, a CFML engine installed. The application was previously calm but since the move to OS X Lion, the Java process would ramp up to 135% CPU utilization and then just sit there...

Our previous Spotlight was the java.net Java Communications Community's post Stable Jitsi 1.0-beta1-build.3651 now available:

After a few months of hard work, debugging and a lot of fun, the Jitsi team is proud to bring you our latest stable Jitsi build! Among the most notable changes this build brings we have: video calls to GTalk, calls to regular numbers via Google Voice, support for Skype

The tenth edition of the JavaZoneconference takes place Wednesday and Thursday this week in Oslo, Norway. Close to 2,500 people are expected to attend the 2011 conference, which has seen steady growth in attendance since its origin as a Sun Microsystems event in 2002. The JavaZone 2011 entry that eirikma posted to the java.net Events Calendardescribes JavaZone as:

the biggest meeting place for software developers in Scandinavia, and one of Europe's most important... JavaZone is a high-quality JUG-organized event with 7 parallell tracks and no boring sponsor talks or the like. It is held downtown Oslo, with great parties across the local pubs just behind the venue.

The About JavaZonepage adds:

Over the two conference days, we deliver more than 200,000 hours of expertise. In addition, many informal discussions take place at stands and between attendees. Altogether, JavaZone stands out as a tremendous arena for knowledge transfer.

The JavaZone 2011 program includes sessions presented by quite a few people you're probably heard of, including Neal Ford, Simon Ritter, Tim Berglund, Mattias Karlsson, Dick Wall -- and lots of sessions by other people who undoubtedly are well-recognized in the Scandinavian/European Java community.

You can join 218 people who follow @JavaZone on Twitter, and/or you can like JavaZone on Facebook (663 people already do).


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted interesting newjava.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks "Which JavaOne 2011 track interests you most (even if you're not attending)?" Voting will be open until Friday, September 16.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Nadine McKenzie's Streamline JSF Development with These 3 Facelets Must-Knows.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is the JavaOne Blog's Mobile App for JavaOne:

The JavaOne Mobile App is now available! Keep connected on your BlackBerry, Droid, or iPhone while at JavaOne. You now have a flexible and convenient way to manage and organize your JavaOne experience. You can access Schedule Builder, exhibitor listings, daily updates, and more. Find out what's happening and where at JavaOne...

Our previous Spotlight was Dalibor Topic's JavaOne 2011: OpenJDK Edition -

As we mentioned in the last episode of the Java Spotlight podcast The JavaOne Content Catalog is now live. This year there are 9 sessions with OpenJDK in their title or abstract...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

 

Filter Blog

By date: