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My previous post (Is Java Really Losing Popularity Among Developers?) elicited a voluminous and varied response, particularly on reddit (489 comments as I write this), and also in the comments posted on the blog itself. In this post I'll touch on a few of the comments, talk a bit more about what TIOBE plots might actually mean, and return to JavaOne 2011 (which I think has great significance as an indicator of Java's and the JVM's future).

The TIOBE Index: what does it really mean?

Several of the commenters on reddit slammed the TIOBE index and my use of it -- for example, petdance's "TIOBE does not measure anything meaningful" and Taladar's "Anyone citing [TIOBE] and in this case even claiming they recommend making important business decisions based on TIOBE to their clients immediately loses all credibility to me."

But clearly, there is some type of correspondance between the TIOBE index chart for a language and how broadly that language is utilized for software development. I mean, if we had an actual accurate measure of usage of programming languages (number of developer hours spent working in each language in the past month, for example), and we performed a regression test between those values and the TIOBE index values for the languages, there would be a positive and significant statistical correlation.

I think the problem isn't so much what the TIOBE index is (they're quite open about this -- there is no secret as to how their index values are computed); rather, the big problem is in the ranking of different langauges based on the TIOBE index values. As Taladar says:

TIOBE is based mostly on data that correlates much better with the amount of help people need with a language than with the actual popularity of the language (e.g. Google searches). It also does not take into account the relative ease or difficulty to automatically detect the various languages and/or their names.

This is actually a pretty good statement of one of my reasons for writing my post -- which was composed largely in response to Paul Krill's InfoWorld article Survey: Java losing popularity among developers, subtitled "If recent trends continue, C could supplant Java as the most popular programming language by next month." (See TIOBE's October 2011 plot below.)

I think it's almost certain that the TIOBE index values, especially for the very popular languages, are positively correlated with the actual usage of those languages. But I don't think it's reasonable to say that a particular major language (C) is about to surpass another major language (Java) in "popularity" based on the TIOBE index.

Does this mean the TIOBE index is completely useless? I don't think so. If you look at the historic values for an individual language, the trend of that line contains some information that could indeed be of use if you're trying to select a new language as an enduring platform for a client who needs to convert an application written in a now-obsolete language. It's just a single data point, of course, and wouldn't be the deciding factor over broader considerations like the suitability of the language for the application, etc. TIOBE's data has an error bar, certainly (and we don't know what it is, from language to language). But what measure doesn't have an error bar when you're selecting a new language for a client? Who can perfectly read the future?

Significance of JavaOne 2011

I have long planned to write a blog series about the significance of JavaOne 2011. This conversation (is Java's popularity declining?) is a good place to start. "Dying" and "dead" are popular words whenever Java's future is discussed. Sun's decline, its acquistion by a fabulously successful (financially) company that is focused on the corporate boardroom and conversations with CTOs (not developers), inevitably produced concern over Java's future. Some technologies do just die, or become like COBOL (huge working code base, so it can't ever entirely disappear), or ... there were lots of possibilities for Java, many of them bad.

I think what's actually happening is a turnaround, a sudden lurch in a positive direction, and this lurch is exemplified by JavaOne 2011. The JavaOne 2011 attendance was about double the JavaOne 2010 attendance (from what I heard). The 2011 attendance is still probably less than 40% that of the most popular mid-2000s JavaOnes; but the direction is right, now. And the volume of energy and excitement were also very positive at JavaOne 2011.

The State of Java (very short version)

Java is no longer stagnant. It is moving ahead in many different directions. There is a plan. The plan is going to be executed. That's something that was lacking in the final Sun years. There were various plans, but would they be executed? Could they possibly be executed while Sun was still the primary Java steward? With Oracle as chief Java steward, we know the plan will indeed be executed. Java 8 will be released in 2 years, with libraries fully upgraded to support Lambda expressions and facilitate development of Java/JVM applications that efficiently utilize 4/8/16+ core processors. JavaFX 3.0 will be write-once/run-anywhere including Mac and Linux, not just Windows. The Java ME / embedded mishmash will be refined/reengineered into something that makes sense. Java EE 7 will be ready for operation in/as a cloud, once "the cloud" congeals into something definable.

There's much more that can be said. I'll do that in my future series on JavaOne 2011 and the state of Java and the JVM and the broader Java community.


java.net Weblogs

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Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What interests you about JavaFX 2.0 and its future?. Voting will be open until Friday, October 28.


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Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


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Our latest java.net Spotlight is Janice J. Heiss' The Developer Insight Series, Part 6: Perspectives on Garbage Collection:

Three leading Java developers, Ron Goldman, Tony Printezis, and Kirk Pepperdine, share their insights about garbage collection. Part of the Developer Insight Series...

Our previous Spotlight was Antonio Goncalves' O Java EE 6 Application Servers, Where Art Thou?:

Nearly two years ago (time flies), when Java EE 6 came out, I wrote a post about application servers where I did some micro benchmarking (basically, startup time). I had plenty of comments and recently I had many people asking for some updates. Witht Java EE 6 booming,with some cloud vendors moving to Java EE 6, it was time to update this microbenchmark and focus on Java EE 6 application servers...

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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

In his latest post, Dustin Marx points us to an article by Paul Krill which was originally posted on InfoWorld, titled Survey: Java losing popularity among developers. The article is subtitled: "If recent trends continue, C could supplant Java as the most popular programming language by next month."

Being a student of numbers and graphs and statistics and mathematical modeling of all types of data (see, for example, my 1999 Stock Market Modeling Techniques paper), I found this title and subtitle both provocative and interesting. I wasn't surprised to find that the base data for the article was the latest TIOBE Programming Community Index (October 2011). Their October headline is "Java is losing ground despite its new version 7 release." And the first sentence is:

Java lost almost 1% of its popularity in September. If this trend continues, C will be number one again next month.

Huh? So, are they saying that 1% of global Java developers were suddenly laid off in October? That seems unlikely! What are we really talking about here? Let's take a look at the TIOBE October 2011 graph:

The top line (red) is Java; the second line (green) is C. The source of the headlines is the convergence of the red and green lines at the top of the very right edge of the plot.

This graph does not show the percent of developers using a particular language (how could you count them?); rather, it presents a substitute metric developed by the TIOBE team. TIOBE welcomes you to see the definition by which their index is constructed.

I've followed the TIOBE index for some years, and I've used it professionally in proposing candidate languages for customers who wanted to translate old software into a modern language. They're trying to provide a metric based on publicly available data. I commend their effort. Of course, there is a rather significant error bar associated with the measures if you try to project them to "this represents how much development occured this month using this particular language."

So, you could look at that plot and say that Java is overall in a slow decline; and C in 2001 was below Java, and has declined, but its decline is at a slower pace, especially recently. You could even say C is on the rise since its low in late 2007, while Java is declining since then.

Back in the days when I analyzed the stock market, I was interested in analytical methods like Bollinger Bands:

http://www.bollingerbands.com/images/bb.jpg



John Bollinger's analysis is related to signal and noise. Most of my programming experience has involved scientific measurement, and measurement of data that has fluctuational patterns that are fairly unpredictable; so, I found Bollinger Bands interesting.

 

What does this have to do with whether Java is "losing popularity" among developers? Well, it perhaps at minimum suggests that one month's data point compared to the previous month's data point may not represent actual significant change in a language'sreal "popularity" or usage. Bollinger Bands are useful because they demonstrate that short-term changes are natural, but at the minute level (say, month-to-month with respect to programming languages) they're not all that relevant in predicting the future long-term. Lots of human-invented systems (not just the stock market) likely follow this pattern, imo based on my experience (and I'm old!).

Are Java and C becoming the enduring platform languages?

So, what if it's true that Java and C are becoming co-leaders with respect to overall usage? Isn't C so old, so un-cool? So, might it be true that Java circa 1.4 is becoming a fundamentally trusted language distribution like C? Is that a bad thing? But then, we also have Java 7, and ahead, prepared for 16-core tablet/phones, Java 8. Is all this such a bad thing?

And wait a minute? Don't percentages have a denomiator?

There's one other thing about a statement that Java is "losing popularity" among developers. The TIOBE index is a "Normalized fraction of total hits" in percent. So, it's showing us how many hits searches on specific languages return, then normalizing those values to 100%. OK... so, what we don't know is the denominator, the total number of hits for all the languages. How has that changed in the decade shown on the graph above? My guess is that it's grown incredibly. If so, then the actual number of hits for Java (and C, and all the other languages that have grown or held their own in the past decade) has grown immensely.

Does this mean we can be certain there are more Java developers than there were a decade ago? Well, it could just reflect the immense changes in the Internet and in search engines in the past decade. But, I'll be stunned if someone can show me evidence that the number of developers making their living coding Java today isn't millions more than that same number 10 years ago. If anyone disagrees with me, please tell me why in a comment below!

Conclusion: I'm happy about the Java line

So, in my view, watching the TIOBE index is indeed interesting, and useful. I use their index in advising my customers. When I look at the October 2011 plot, I think: if the language you've bet your career on is Java or C, even if you're just starting out, you've got nothing to worry about (as long as you're willing to work your butt off and produce, of course). My guess is the market for both skill sets is currently expanding immensely year by year.

That's the message the TIOBE index October 2011 plot sends to me.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, quite a few people have posted interesting new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What interests you about JavaFX 2.0 and its future?. Voting will be open until Friday, October 28.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

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Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Episode 52: Cameron Purdy, Vice President of Development at Oracle, on JavaEE :

The Executive Committees of the JCP have been busy for the past several months on some significant revisions to the Process. These changes have been specified through JSR 348: Towards a new version of the Java Community Process...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The JCP Program Office has annoucedthat the 2011 Executive Committee elections are under way. Thursday morning at 8:30 AM (US Pacific Daylight Time) there will be a "Meet the Candidates" conference call. Heather VanCura, from the JCP Program Office, commented:

This is a great opportunity to meet the candidates, listen to their qualification statements and ask questions.

In other words, this is an interactive call. It's a good chance to go beyond simply reading the candidates' qualifications and deciding who you'll vote for based on published materials.

Here's something else to consider: there are a lot of candidates for this election. There are nine candidates for two open seats on the Standard/Enterprise Executive Committee; and there are five candidates for two open seats on the Micro Edition Executive Committee. So, if you'll be voting, it's going to take some time to give appropriate consideration to each candidate.

The "Meet the Candidates" call, then, is an opportunity to get a clearer view of what distinguishes the candidates. You'll find complete details for joining the call near the bottom of Heather's blog post.

Voting in the EC Special Election will be open through October 31. Election results will be presented on November 1.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Jan Haderka posted new java.net blog:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks What interests you about JavaFX 2.0 and its future?. Voting will be open until Friday, October 28.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

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Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Patrick Curran's No more smoke-filled rooms:

The Executive Committees of the JCP have been busy for the past several months on some significant revisions to the Process. These changes have been specified through JSR 348: Towards a new version of the Java Community Process...

Our previous Spotlight was Markus Eisele's The Heroes of Java: Fabiane Bizinella Nardon:

Fabiane Bizinella Nardon is a computer scientist who is passionate about creating software that will positively change the world we live in. She was the architect of the Brazilian Healthcare Information System, considered the largest JavaEE application in the world...

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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The results of our recent poll that overlapped JavaOne 2011 indicate that news from JavaOne 2011 related to Java 8, JavaFX, and Java EE was considered most significant by the developers who chose to vote in the poll. A total of 50 votes were cast, with the following results:

The most important news from JavaOne 2011 will be / was related to:

  • 34% (17 votes) - Java 8
  • 4% (2 votes) - Non-Java JVM languages
  • 24% (12 votes) - JavaFX
  • 18% (9 votes) - Java EE
  • 2% (1 vote) - Embedded Java
  • 6% (3 votes) - Java ME
  • 2% (1 vote) - Other
  • 10% (5 votes) - I don't know

Overall, these results don't surprise me all that much. To me, the thrust of JavaOne 2011 was captured in the essence of the conference slogan "Moving Java Forward." Now, you'd typically take it for granted that a software platform moves forward, right? But most of us (I think) would agree that forward motion for Java had almost ceased to exist as Sun teetered toward the abyss. And the doubts weren't allayed when the Oracle acquisition of Sun took nine very long months to complete. And the doubts weren't allayed as Oracle made some mistakes during the first months of its tenure as chief Java ecosystem steward.

With JavaOne 2011, the uncertainty certainly seems to have been largely sent away. A vision for the future of Java is clear. The focus of that vision, I think, is pretty well expressed in the results of this poll. Java 8 is going to solve Java's multicore problem. Running Java apps on a single processor when most people have 16-core/processor machines a few years from now would relegate Java to being... fairly useless as a desktop programming platform? Is it fair to characterize it that way? I think so. And the "desktop" of the future clearly includes tablets, phones... So, this is a problem that must be solved. Between Java 7's Fork/Join and Java 8's Lambda expressions (facilitating closures), the problem is solved.

Continuing to talk about the desktop: JavaOne 2011 revealed JavaFX to be the Java desktop platform of the future. This is Oracle's vision. JavaFX is being open sourced; it's now pure Java; it's going to be ported to all mainstream Java platforms. It's intended to be what you use by default if you're a Java developer and you're writing clients. That's big news, given where JavaFX stood not long ago.

Java EE received the third most votes. The "cloud" was certainly prominent at JavaOne 2011. However, the agreement that the cloud is as yet not sufficiently defined, not sufficiently standardized, to permit specific actions within the realm of Java EE, was also prominent. Yes, multitenancy is going to be important. Yes, streamlining start-up and providing for alternative configuration formats is going to be important. But, Java EE has to move ahead in these areas in a manner that will make it ready for the future cloud regardless of what structure the cloud "condenses" into a few years from now. The cloud isn't really leading Java EE now, because it's too nebulous; on the other hand, there are known areas in Java EE that can be improved; and making these improvements will enhance Java EE's ability to meet the needs of the future cloud, regardless of what structure becomes the cloud's norm.

I was a bit surprised that "Non-Java JVM languages" received so few votes. But, maybe the Java 8 category usurped some votes that might have gone to the non-Java JVM languages, since many Java 8 enhancements will provide benefits to non-Java JVM languages as well as to Java itself.

JavaOne 2011 presented a coherent vision for Java ME and embedded Java as well. But, few voters considered these news items to be the most important news of the conference.

New poll: JavaFX and its future

Our new java.net poll asks What interests you about JavaFX 2.0 and its future?. Voting will be open until Friday, October 28.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


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Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


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It's clear that I'm not the only one who considers JavaOne 2011 to have been momentous in many ways. If you weren't there (and, of course, that means more than 99.9% of Java developers), or if you were there and missed more than you saw (was anything else possible?), you can (re-)experience some of the key technical sessions by visiting the JavaOne 2011 section on Parleys.com.

During the Community Keynote on Thursday, October 6, Stephan Janssen, founder of Parleys, the Belgian Java User Group (BeJUG), JavaPolis, and other organizations, took the stage for a few minutes to talk about JavaOne 2011 on Parleys.com. He said that eventually about 40% of the 400 or so total JavaOne 2011 sessions will be available on Parleys. The current sessions count is approaching 20, and the rest will be published at a rate of about three sessions per week.

So, what exactly is a Parleys rendition of a JavaOne technical session? What sets it apart from, say, downloading the PDFs from sessions from the JavaOne 2011 Content Catalog?

Having access to the conference presentations is great (and it's excellent that so many presenters have already put their presentations up onto the Content Catalog site -- for example, more than half of the presentations in the Core Java track are already there). But, with Parleys, you experience the presentation as though you are there attending the session. The Parleys rendition includes full audio as you watch the slides. Furthermore (something you can't get from the Content Catalog), Parleys records the live demos that are part of the presentations.

All of this is presented in a very friendly UI:

You can easily navigate through the presentation, download the presentation for off-line viewing using the Parleys Desktop client, or get the code to embed the presentation into another web page.

As I write this, 17 JavaOne 2011 presentations are available in the Parleys.com JavaOne 2011 space, including several of the JavaFX sessions, Joe Darcy's "The Heads and Tails of Project Coin," Adam Bien's "Rethinking Best Practices with Java EE 6," Geertjan Wielenga's "How to Refactor for Java 7" -- and lots more.

Parleys is a great resource that captures the essence of a momentous JavaOne 2011 conference. In doing so, it will ultimately be a fantastic reference on the state of Java circa October 2011.


java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current java.net poll asks for your response to the promptThe most important news from JavaOne 2011 will be / was related to. Voting will be open until Friday, October 14.


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is JavaOne 2011: It's a Wrap, by Tori Wieldt:

Thanks for being a part of JavaOne 2011! Here are a few more things you can do to keep that Java buzz: Provide Feedback. Take the conference survey and session surveys. Register for Next Year. We know JavaOne 2012 will be bigger and better...

Our previous Spotlight was JavaOne 2011 - A Tremendous Success: Blogosphere Round-up, by Dustin Marx:

The blogosphere is full of accounts of JavaOne 2011 and most of them are extremely positive. Peter Hendriks says of JavaOne 2011, "the Java vibe is back" and "Java is moving forward again." Cameron McKenzie says of JavaOne 2011, "Mark it up as a success." After one day at JavaOne 2011, Sean Landis stated, "There are good things happening" and "good things on the horizon." ...

Before that, we featured Terrence Barr's JavaOne 2011: First Wrap-Up:

Finally, I get a chance to catch my breath. JavaOne has been extremely busy and while there are still a few hours of good talks to go here is a quick summary so far: General observations: The vibe is very positive. Attendance is significantly up over previous years and the show is well organized. Feedback from attendees has been very excouraging...

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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The very last thing JUG-AFRICA founder Max Bonbhel did at JavaOne 2011 was to spend a few moments with me chatting about Java User Groups in Africa and the unique problems they, and African developers in general, face. Despite the obstacles, growth of the Java community in Africa is surging.

Check out the video:

Immediately after that last scene, Max was literally running to where he had stowed his packed luggage in the Mason Street Cafe. I think he probably made his flight, but time indeed was running very short!

Visit the Oracle Media Network for more JavaOne 2011 videos (click on the "Newest" tab).


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More Java One News

Here are some additional JavaOne stories we're featuring in ourJava news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlights are:

  • John Rose's JSR 292 cited by JCP for excellence:
    This evening in San Francisco I was deeply touched to be recognized at the 9th Annual Awards Nominations of the Java Community Process. On behalf of the JSR 292 Expert Group, I accepted an award for Most Innovative JSR, and another for leading the Expert Group. These honors arise from a huge amount of teamwork. Together we introduced fundamentally new instructions and data types into the Java Virtual Machine, an undertaking that was both ambitious and complex...
  • The Java Source reports on Moving Java Forward -- Java Strategy Keynote JavaOne 2011http://blogs.oracle.com/java/entry/moving_java_forward_java_strategy:
    Tuesday's Strategy Keynote offered Oracle's long-term vision for investment and innovation in Java. The session offered a broad range of technologies, partners, announcements, and roadmaps -- from mobile and handheld devices, to the desktop, to the Cloud. The morning began with David Ward, CTO and Chief Architect, Platform Systems Division, Juniper Networks. Ward detailed the need...
  • Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine points us to the JavaOne 2011 Slides (a beginning):
    Whether you are attending JavaOne 2011 or not, you'll probably be interested in downloading slides used at the conference. They are starting to show up on the conference content catalog , so here are a few ones that are relevant to Java EE and GlassFish...

Poll

Our current java.net poll asks for your response to the promptThe most important news from JavaOne 2011 will be / was related to. Voting will be open until Friday, October 14.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

The end of JavaOne 2011 is approaching. Yes, officially only 2 days of a 4 day conference have been completed -- but it feels like most of the headline news has already broken. Then also, some of us have been here since late last week (the java.net Community Leads meeting was on Saturday, Oracle ACEs had events before that, etc.). Today is my last full day at JavaOne, I'll be printing my boarding pass in the Hilton lobby later today... That said, I very much look forward to the remaining sessions I plan to attend, and to Thursday's "Java Community Keynote."

JavaOne 2011 has a very different feel to me, compared with the last JavaOne I attended (Sun's last event, in 2009). At this point, I don't want to say much more about this. For one thing, I've had a problem at JavaOne 2011: my wish that I could apply Java 7's Fork/Join Framework to myself, and attend every session and BOF every day, while also speaking for at least a few minutes with everyone who attended the conference, failed (Lamine Ba has asked me to let him know when I get this Fork/Join thing figured out).

Anyway, the conclusion I reached this past night / early morning is that I consider JavaOne 2011 to be momentous in quite a few ways. But in order to really focus my thoughts on this, I'm going to have to wait until I've had a chance to study and consider some of the parts of JavaOne I missed, read everything everyone else has posted, re-watch the keynotes, download and study slides from presentations, re-review some of what's happened in the past few months, etc. That can only be done after JavaOne 2011. Then, I'll start a blog series, to be called (tentatively) "The Significance of JavaOne 2011."

This shouldn't be a one-person effort. Ideally, it would almost be like a little open source thought project, with constructive input from many members of the Java developer community integrated into the blog series.

Before I leave JavaOne 2011, I'd like to know what other people who attended the conference think about JavaOne 2011, its impact, significance, etc. It's a rainy day in San Francisco thus far, with rain expected for most of the day. Given this, the Mason Street area probably won't be the most comfortable place for meeting and chatting. My plan is to use the area near Starbucks in the Hilton lobby as a place to meet people, if/when Mason Street is being rained on. I'll tweet my whereabouts as the day proceeds (@kevin_farnham). Find me if you'd like to chat! Or post comments here, whatever works...

So, what is the significance of JavaOne 2011 in your view?


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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Tuesday morning at JavaOne, I spoke with London Java Community leader Martijn Verburg about the LJC's decision to seek a position on the JCP's Executive Committee, the JCP.next (JSR 348) effort, the outlook for JUGs and the JCP, JavaOne, Java, ... all this in under 3 minutes!

Check out the Oracle Media Network for more JavaOne 2011 videos (click on the "Newest" tab).


More Java One News

Here are some additional JavaOne stories we're featuring in ourJava news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net JavaOne Spotlight is:


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-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

If you regularly visit java.net's Java news tab, you'll be accustomed to seeing blog posts by Dustin Marx featured there. Dustin is here at JavaOne 2011, and he's putting together an excellent collection of what this year's JavaOne is all about (in its core aspects) on his blog, Inspired by Actual Events.

As I write this, Dustin has already posted 13 JavaOne 2011 entries (several of which I've featured in the java.net "Java News" tab or as java.net "Spotlights"). Here's a list (chopped out of the "Blog Archive" section of Dustin's blog):

If you don't already yet subscribe to Inspired by Actual Events, you probably should consider doing so!


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The blur phase of JavaOne 2011 has started for me. I quickly realized this morning how brief 30 minutes between sessions is, when during that time I want to check out the best JavaOne related blog posts on java.net and elsewhere, update the java.net site, and post some blogs of my own. It's simply not possible.

That said, JavaOne 2011 thus far is very interesting, very good, in my opinion. I started out this morning by attending the JavaOne Technical Keynote. See Dustin Marx's excellent post, JavaOne 2011: Opening (Technical) Keynote, for an overview of what was said.

Next, I attended the "JCP and the Developer Community" session, which featured JCP members and representatives of the Java User Groups who are now members of the JCP Executive Committee. I see lots that developers should be pleased about happening in the JCP. I'll write more about it soon.

After grabbing lunch, I was late for the "Introduction to JavaFX 2.0" session -- which was sufficiently well attended that I chose to stand. I was planning to update the java.net page as I watched, but couldn't get my internet connection to work. The same problem prevented speaker Nicolas Lorain from being able to run his planned demos (though I think he was using a wired connection). Again, the direction here is interesting -- though many developers will argue the current Windows-only support makes JavaFX currently irrelevant (this is being addressed, though).

I just got back from what I think could be the most important single session of the conference (thus far, anyway): "Project Lambda: To Multicore and Beyond." Again, I'll write more about this soon.

My last session of the day will also look ahead to Java 8 - "Project JigSaw: Find the Corner Pieces First"


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More Java One News

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Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlights is JavaOne 2011: Opening (Technical) Keynote:

JavaOne 2011 appears to be very well attended. The Hilton San Francisco Ballroom A/B is standing-room only for theJavaOne 2011 Technical (Opening) Keynote and they have announced the overflow rooms as the Imperial and Yosemite conference rooms. As I type this, we are being told that there is more space devoted to JavaOne this year (as compared to last year) and that there is increased attendance...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

You may have noticed that our java.net home page suddenly looks different: the centerpiece is a long column of JavaOne-related blog posts. This is a java.net JavaOne tradition that dates back I don't know exactly how far -- but I have the feeling it was in place for at least several JavaOne's that preceded my first as java.net editor (2009).

With JavaOne 2011 rapidly accelerating into full swing (today is Java User Group Sunday, with lots of community-related events taking place -- the JUG Leaders' brunch, a GlassFish community event -- and it's also Java University Day), I thought I'd take a few minutes to explain the structure of what you'll see on java.net in the coming days -- before my 2011 JavaOne experience becomes a blur of keynotes, sessions, informal chats with members of the community, and blogs about all of that.

The the center of the java.net home page during JavaOne 2001, as I said, will feature blog posts by java.net's own bloggers (including my own posts).

Our Spotlights section, in the right column, will feature two types of item:

  • links that let you follow JavaOne more closely, whether you're in attendance or following from afar; and
  • links to pages that cover the most significant news to come out of the conference.

Then, on our Java news tab, you'll find primarily JavaOne-related blog posts from bloggers whose blogs are hosted somewhere other than on java.net (but really, shouldn't all of these people move their blogs to java.net?).

In my own blogs (but not this one), I'll typically include a list of the Spotlights and Java News items I've recently put onto the site, along with recent blog posts from other java.net bloggers.

If you're not among the fortunate few who enjoy the privilege of attending JavaOne 2011, I'm hoping you'll find java.net to be a resource that will let you follow the conference as effectively as possible from afar.

If you're attending, you'll find java.net to be a repository that will perhaps point you to some of the items you didn't catch as they happened -- unfortunately, none of us can be in 5 different JavaOne locations simultaneously!


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

With JavaOne 2011 imminent, we have a new java.net poll that provides you the opportunity to predict what the most important news from JavaOne will be (if you vote beforehand), or voice your opinion on what the most important news was (if you vote after the conference ends). The poll options were selected with reference to the description of Monday morning's JavaOne Technical Keynote.

So, what area of Java/JVM technology do you think the most important news to come out of JavaOne will be related to:

  • Java 8
  • Non-Java JVM languages
  • JavaFX
  • Java EE
  • Embedded Java
  • Java Me
  • or: something else?

Vote in our new poll!


Articles

Our latest java.net article is Sanjay Dasgupta's VisualLangLab - Grammar without Tears.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest java.net Spotlight is Finding Your Way Around JavaOne:

Imagine: You are at JavaOne and you forgot to print out your schedule! What do you do? Or, you know your next session but not how to find it. Here are some pointers: To find session times and locations while onsite at JavaOne: 1) At registration, you'll get a schedule overview 2) the JavaOne Mobile App is available for Blackberry, Android and iPhone, 3) you can use the Connection Centers in the Zonewhere you can look up schedule time and location...

Our previous Spotlight was Java Posse Episode 364 - Sept 24th 2011, which features the java.netVisualLangLab project as its "Project of the week":

Project of the week - VisualLangLab - * If you are observing the crop of new languages springing up at present (like Kotlin, Ceylon, etc.) and think to yourself "I could do better than that", well, now's your chance. * VisualLangLab is a graphical tool for designing language grammars. * The tool gives you the ability to examine the resulting abstract syntax tree from a code snippet passed through your grammar, and helps you write the grammar you want...

Before that, we featured NetBeans at the JavaOne 2011 Conference:

Join members of the NetBeans team; chat with local Java Champions, NetBeans Dream Team members, Java User Group Leaders and fellow NetBeans community members at JavaOne 2011, the destination to share best practices, proven solutions, code samples, and demos that show how to apply Java technology to real-world projects...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

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