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Java User Groups are becoming active in educating the next generation of Java developers. In a post to the JUG Leaders email list, the MoroccoJUG stated that they organized "a new program to give Java EE courses to students in their graduation year (from engineering schools and university..)". They call the program JEMI (Java Education Moroccan Initiative).

The curriculum includes:

  • Enterprise application with Java EE6 (Java EE overview)
  • Web Development ( JSP, Servlets); JSF
  • CDI (Context & dependency injection)
  • JPA 2.0; EJB 3.0
  • JAX-WS within the context of Web Services and RESTful Web Services

Pictures are available on the MoroccoJUG Flickr page.

The Pakistan JUG has also "started a 4-session Java EE 6 Workshop in local university,ialamabad,Pakistan to educate students about Java."

The idea of Java User Groups engaging in educating the younger generation of developers is receiving considerable attention on the JUG Leaders email list of late. Java User Group Chennai leader Raj Hegde wonders:

Do we really need multiple version of java material in English (which is a common in many countries) ? If we do so what i see is some very basic change in this... instead of creating multiple English version of Java Education material, why not well first all join and create one single English version and then let regional JUGs can translate this material to their regional language (spanish, french, tamil, hindi etc) I feel this makes sense.!

Makes a lot of sense to me, too. Why not have a "master" version of essential Java material written in English. Then, where needed, involve Java User Groups to provide translations for members of their locality who cannot benefit from the English language edition? This, as opposed to having many different versions of basic Java content produced in various countries...

Raj ends his post with:

We have started wonderful movements in these days "Adopt a JSR" "Adopt OpenJDK" Why not we make something on a common Java English material and then let it be with regional JUG to do in different languages.

Java User Groups have indeed recently become very active in the JCP via the Adopt-A-JSR Program, and they are also increasingly active in Java's future through increased involvement in development of the next generation of the OpenJDK. Educating the next generation of developers does indeed seem a natural extension of these efforts, no?


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Rex Young posted new java.net blog:


Java News

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Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is the NetBeans Team's NetBeans IDE 7.1 Satisfaction Survey:

Thank you for taking the time to provide your feedback on your experience with NetBeans IDE 7.1 or the update release NetBeans IDE 7.1.1. Question 1. Are you providing feedback for NetBeans IDE 7.1 or the update release 7.1.1? ...

Our previous Spotlight was Arun Gupta's Jersey 2.0 Milestone 2 Now Available:

Jersey 2.0 milestone 2 is now available. It builds upon the first milestone and adds several new features such as server-side asynchronous processing, server-side content negotiation, improved JAX-RS parameter injection, and several others...

Before that, we featured Emil Ivov's Google Summer of Code 2012 is on! Apply Now!:

This year Jitsi is participating in GSoC under the umbrella of the XMPP Standards Foundation. To all students: check our the Jitsi project ideas and Apply Now!. You can also check the other cool XMPP projects particpating with the XSF. Waste no time, deadline is April 6!

Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Michael Bar-Sinai's PanelMatic 101.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

In the past I've always publicized the start and end of the JavaOne Call for Papers (CfP) period. But, this year, it has special significance for me -- I'm planning to submit a proposal for a JavaOne session this year! So, with the deadline just two weeks away (11:59 PM Pacific Time on April 9), I'm paying more attention to the JavaOne CfP deadline than ever before.

Now that I'm into the process, I realize that submitting a proposed JavaOne paper involves quite a lot of work, and forethought. The Submission Information page describes the requirements for submitting a proposal for a JavaOne 2012 session. The Tips and Guidelines page provides advice on how to submit a successful proposal.

If you're thinking about submitting a proposal and you haven't started work on it yet, here are some of the things you need to start thinking about and planning (items you'll need to enter as you submit your proposal):

  • Title: You only have 80 characters, so make it brief; but, also be sure to accurately describe your session.
  • Abstract: in 750 characters, tell JavaOne attendees what they'll learn if they attend your session.
  • Presentation Summary: this extended section is your opportunity to describe to the JavaOne committee the real gist of your proposed session. This content will not necessarily be seen by JavaOne attendees, but what you put here could make the committee decide to accept your proposal, over someone else's proposal. This section is your best opportunity to describe in some detail the actual content of your session, and its significance.
  • Takeaways: in a single phrase each, describe the three top "take-aways" you intend to provide to your session's audience.
  • Session Type: options for JavaOne 2012 include: 1 hour conference session; 1 hour panel; 1 or 2 hour hands-on lab; ~45 minute Birds of a Feather (BOF); 1 hour Community Keynote; 2 hour interactive tutorial (a new type of JavaOne session).
  • Session Category: Best Practices, Case Study, Product/Strategy Roadmap, or Other.
  • Experience Level: Introductory, Intermediate, or Advanced.
  • Attendee Roles: select two groups of people who can best profit from attending your session (Architect, Enterprise Developer, Mobile Developer, Desktop Developer, etc.).

A nice feature: you can start filling out your session proposal form, then save it and return to do more work on it later. However, you must "complete" a page before you can save your info and quit. To be able to save what I had entered on the first page (which took me some time), I ended up entering very tiny abstract and presentation summary blocks last night. I'll come back to those and expand the entries later -- but soon, of necessity!

In order to submit a proposal for a JavaOne 2012 session, you need an Oracle user account.

Overall, as someone with decades of experience running a small company and working with bigger companies that contract out to U.S. government and corporate entities, I find the JavaOne Call for Papers site/platform to be well organized, well structured. They're not going to do the work for you, but the information they're asking you to provide is well-tailored toward helping you organize your own thoughts with respect to making what you want to present useful to the particular subset of JavaOne attendees to whom you'd like to speak. The proposal site makes you think about why you want to present your session, who it's likely to benefit, etc. That's pretty cool!

I just wish I had a bit more time before the deadline (Monday, April 9, 11:59 PM Pacific US time) to complete my proposal... Back to it soon!


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks To what extent do you expect Lambda Expressions (closures) in Java 8 to affect your programming?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 30.


Java News

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Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Heather Van Cura's JCP 2012 Public EC Meeting Schedule - Call for Agenda Items:

The JCP.org calendar has been updated to include Public EC Meeting Teleconferences, as required by JCP Program version 2.8 (as defined in JSR 348)--dates are Tuesday, 26 June and Tuesday, 20 November. The second hour of these JCP EC Teleconferences will be open to the public...

Prior to that, we featured John Rose's value types in the vm:

In this note, we propose a definition of value types in terms of a design pattern for Java classes, accompanied by a set of usage restrictions. We also sketch the relation of such value types to tuple types (which are a JVM-level notion), and point out JVM optimizations that can apply to value types. This note is a thought experiment to extend the JVM

The Java Nation section of the just published March/April issue of Java Magazine initiates coverage of the 2011-2012 Java Olympics, a competition for university students that's taking place in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. The competition is long and grueling, taking place over a period of six months that started this past November. Take a look at these competitors as they strove to survive Round 2, which is completing as I write this.

Round 1 took place online at 151 universities. The students answered questions invented by a team of 12 Russian engineers. The winners of that round travelled to 10 cities for the on-site Round 2 (the photos are from Round 2). Each student was provided with a computer preloaded with Oracle JDK 1.7u2 and NetBeans 7.1. And, they were presented with a more difficult selection of problems.

The Round 2 winners will travel to Astana, Kazakhstan to participate in the final Round 3. The winners there will be invited to travel to Moscow in 2013 for JavaOne Moscow. My guess is that the winners will also suddenly be highly sought after by job recruiters!


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Bhavani Shankar has posted two new java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks To what extent do you expect Lambda Expressions (closures) in Java 8 to affect your programming?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 30.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Note to the Java 8 development team (and the JCP): the latest completed Java.net poll indicates that Java developers overwhelmingly advocate the inclusion of JSR 310 in Java 8. Not only did the poll draw a large volume of voting, but the votes were unusually strongly skewed toward one of the six voting options.

A total of 891 votes were cast, and three comments were posted as well. The actual question and results were:

How critical is it for JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) to be implemented in Java 8?

  • 75% (667 votes) - Very - as JEP 150 states, "the existing Java date and time classes are poor, mutable, and have unpredictable performance"
  • 11% (102 votes) - It would be nice, but we can get by using the current classes
  • 3% (23 votes) - Makes little difference to me
  • 1% (5 votes) - I prefer the current date and time classes
  • 3% (28 votes) - I don't know
  • 7% (66 votes) - Other

This is a remarkable result which, even though Java.net polls are voluntary surveys, and not scientific polls, would seem to have some significance. A large number of developers looked at the question and chose to vote. Among those who chose to vote, an unusually large majority selected the same option: that it's very critical for JSR 310 to be implemented in Java 8.

That option quoted OpenJDK JEP 150. Authored by Stephen Colebourne, this JEP (JDK Enhancement Proposal) advocates moving JSR 310 ahead sufficiently rapidly that it can be included in Java 8.

As Java.net user heathm commented:

Given the fact that we were expecting this in Java 7, I think it's something that's long overdue and must be included in Java 8.

jhannes noted:

java.util.Date and java.util.Calendar is somewhere between useless and dangerous. A new date API is definately called for.

And panayiotis_alefragis pointed out:

This is a must have in any scheduling application, we are forced to use custom libraries...

I'll say this (I never vote in Java.net polls since I create them): if (like panayiotis_alefragis), you have to develop custom libraries for something as basic as date and time manipulations in a language as high level and mature as Java -- yeah, I think we have a problem here!

Looks like Stephen Colebourne, heathm,jhannes, panayiotis_alefragis, 664 otherJava.net poll voters, and undoubtedly a great many others agree on this question. Let's hope Stephen's JEP 150 objective is accomplished, and the JSR 310 new Date and Time API is indeed included in Java 8!

New poll: how will Java 8 closures affect your programming?

Our new Java.net poll asks To what extent do you expect Lambda Expressions (closures) in Java 8 to affect your programming? Voting will be open until Friday, March 30.


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is the JavaOne 2012 Call for Papers:

If you have an interesting presentation idea for JavaOne 2012, we want to hear from you! The Call for Papers is open now through April 9, so don't delay. To help ensure successful submission, please take the time to review the General Information...

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

A recent topic of discussion on the Java.net JUG Leaders mailing list has been how Java User Groups can entice more people who express interest in attending meetings to actually attend the meetings. JUG Indonesia leader Frans Thamura indicated that typically only about 1/3 of the people who sign up for their JUG meetings actually end up attending.

Martijn Verburg of the London Java Community suggests that, when this happens, "you need to find out why." Martijn says "we used to have this problem at the LJC events..." How did the LJC deal with this situation? Basically, by taking an individualistic approach to assess why people who signed up to attend were ultimately not attending. That is, the LJC contacted these people, asked them why they didn't attend, then modified their own approach to meetings in order to better address the needs of their broader community.

Martijn cites the following as among the changes the LJC has made in order to better accomodate their community and facilitate higher attendance at their meetings:

  • change of venue so it was closer to a majority of folks
  • change time to suit working hours
  • provide food so people could stay later
  • give better directions
  • set reminders for people

"The list goes on :-)" he adds.

Sounds like good advice -- apply the one-on-one personal approach!


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, two new java.net blogs have been posted:


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks How critical is it for JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) to be implemented in Java 8?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 16.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Prior to last year's JavaOne, I was in contact with Ryan Cuprak, president of the Connecticut Java Users Group (USA). The plan was that we'd get together at some point during JavaOne and chat. As it turned out, once JavaOne started it quickly became a whirlwind for me (and for Ryan, who presented at least 4 sessions at the conference). I was on the way to the airport on the last day of the conference, when my phone rang. It was Ryan: he was available for our chat!

Not only did I not get to chat with Ryan at JavaOne (aside from the brief phone call), but I also missed all of his sessions. So, when I found out that Ryan would be re-presenting one of his JavaOne sessions at the March meeting of CTJUG, I decided to attend.

The session Ryan presented was "Patterns and Best Practices for CDI" (which is now available on Parleys). At JavaOne, the session was co-presented with Reza Rahman, Java EE / EJB / JMS JCP expert and Resin appserver developer.

Connecticut has no cities that can be called a metropolis. The capital, Hartford, has about 100,000 residents. So, I didn't expect hundreds of people to show up for the meeting. In fact, the attendance at this particular CTJUG meeting was just over a dozen. Most of the developers who attended work in the insurance industry (which is a major part of Connecticut's economy). Some of the attendees said they currently are not doing any Java work -- but they still like to attend CTJUG meetings! Three people (including me and my wife) were attending a CTJUG meeting for the first time.

For me, Ryan's presentation was very informative, since I haven't worked with CDI (Contexts and Dependency Injection, JSR 299). Ryan covered the history of technologies that eventually led to its formulation, then went into detail on topics including Annotations (versus XML configuration), qualifiers, naming, scoping, stereotypes, interceptors, decorators, dependency resource injection, CDI integration, and extensions.

Now, I'm not ready to call myself an expert on CDI after a one-hour presentation. But, I know a lot more about the genesis and utility of CDI than I did before. It seems like it can be applied to considerably shorten the Java EE development cycle.

I was surprised to learn that CDI can also be used in Swing desktop applications. Similarly, I would not have guessed that mixing CDI and JPA can produce complications (since both technologies manage their own lifecycles -- Ryan says this problem can be bridged by CDI producers).

Ryan cites the Arquillian unit testing platform as being the most important CDI extension. He notes that although Arquillian is a JBoss community project, it also works with GlassFish.

If you'd like all the details from Ryan Cuprak's and Reza Rahman's JavaOne 2011 Patterns and Best Practices for CDI presentation, watch it on Parleys!


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks How critical is it for JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) to be implemented in Java 8?. Voting ends this Friday, March 16.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:

I have a Google Alertthat searches for "JUG Java" -- it works pretty well. A few days ago, it pointed me to the Adopt-a-JSR presentation that's now available on Java.net in the Java User Groups JUG Collateral Pack 1_ 2012 folder. The 17-slide presentation is authored by Martijn Verburg and James Gough of the London Java Community("with lots of extra valuable input" from SouJava).

You might remember that both the London Java Community and SouJava are currently members of the JCP SE/EE Executive Committee. So, they're already very involved in guiding the future directions of the Java platform.

The Adopt-A-JSRprogram, if you're not familiar with it, encourages Java User Groups to actively participate in current Java Specification Requests (JSRs). The idea is that a Java User Group selects a JSR (or more than one) of particular interest to its members, and "adopts" the JSR, through the active engagement of its members in moving the JSR forward toward completion.

Here's how the Adopt-A-JSRintroduction states it:

This program is intended to encourage JUG members to get involved in a Java Specification Request (JSR) and to evangelise that JSR to their JUG and the wider Java community in order to increase grass roots participation. JSRs cover all aspects of the Java ecosystem such as the new Date and Time API coming into Java 8, the latest JavaEE 7 APIs for the cloud and much more! This program will realise the following benefits...

The presentation is a very nice way to introduce yourself (and your local Java User Group) to the Adopt-A-JSR program. It leads by defining key acronyms (JUG, JSR, JCP, RI, TCK), then points out some of the reasons Java User Groups should consider getting involved (to move the entire Java ecosystem forward, to be at the forefront of new technology, to boost the careers of JUG members, to demystify the JCP and the standards process, ...). The presentation also outlines the benefits to Java Standards; current Java User Group participants, efforts, and accomplishments; and how to get started yourself (i.e., your JUG) and make good progress.

On the final slide, Duke offers further inspiration, and promises to thank you in person should you decide to help! (Well, I made up that last part, but if you do help by joining the Adopt-A-JSReffort, I'll personally lobby Duke on your behalf the next time I see him...)


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks How critical is it for JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) to be implemented in Java 8?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 16.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Arun Gupta'sJavaOne India 2012 CFP Now Open - Submit Now!:

When? May 3-4, 2011; Where? Hyderabad International Convention Center, India; What? Technical keynote,technical sessions, exhibitor halls, hallway conversations, biryani, etc...

Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Michael Bar-Sinai's PanelMatic 101.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

A plurality of voters in a recently completed Java.net poll approve of the new penalties imposed on JCP Executive Committee members who miss consecutive meetings. A total of 214 votes were cast in the poll, with the following results:

Under JCP 2.8, EC members lose their voting rights if they miss two consecutive meetings. Your view on this?

  • 38% (82 votes) - It's great - EC members shouldn't miss meetings
  • 12% (26 votes) - It's a bad idea - EC members should always be able to vote
  • 8% (17 votes) - I doubt it will change anything
  • 14% (31 votes) - Who cares?
  • 10% (21 votes) - I don't know
  • 17% (37 votes) - Other

While 38% is a considerable plurality in comparision with the percentages for all the other response options, you certainly can't say there's incredible enthusiasm within the developer community on this issue, based on these results. A combined 32% of the voters either don't think the new rules will make much difference, don't care, or don't know what they think about the new rules.

Still, only 12% of the voters voiced disapproval of the new rules. Perhaps some of the people who selected "Other" disapprove of the new rules, but no one took the time to post a comment.

Finally, the vote total was fairly low compared with many recent Java.net polls. While these are not scientific polls, a low vote total certainly suggests a low level of interest in the poll question.

New poll: Do we need JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) in Java 8?

Our new Java.net poll asks How critical is it for JSR-310 (new Date and Time API) to be implemented in Java 8?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 16.


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted interesting newjava.net blogs:


Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Michael Bar-Sinai's PanelMatic 101.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Adam Bien's Interview With Mission Impossible Java Hacker--Fabiane Nardon:

What was your first computer? It was a Prologica CP200 S, with a Z80 chip and 16K RAM. This was a domestic Brazilian computer that was sold in the 80s. How did you start with programming? What was your first "Hello World"? When my parents gave me my first computer, I thought it was like a video game, but then I realized that it would not do anything unless I would program it myself. So, I learned Basic...

Previously, we featured James L. Weaver's Laying Out a User Interface with JavaFX 2.0:

This article shows you how to use the layout capabilities of JavaFX 2.0 to make nodes in the scene graph appear where you want them to be and be the appropriate size as the window is resized...

Interview With Mission Impossible Java Hacker--Fabiane Nardon 

Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

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