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JavaFX has certainly come a long way in the past 18 months or so. But, will its momentum continue to the point where it eventually displaces most other platforms that are used for developing Java client/desktop applications? Our recently completed Java.net poll asked the community for its views on the future of JavaFX. A total of 660 people cast votes in the poll. The exact question and results were:

How long will it take for JavaFX to become the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop apps?

  • 14% (90 votes) - Under 2 years
  • 17% (114 votes) - Between 2 and 5 years
  • 6% (42 votes) - Between 5 and 10 years
  • 3% (20 votes) - More than a decade
  • 23% (149 votes) - It will never happen
  • 12% (76 votes) - I don't know
  • 26% (169 votes) - Other

How does one interpret these results? "Other" received the most votes, but no one chose to post a comment stating why they selected "Other." Surely the timespan options cover the entirety of the future, and "It will never happen" covers the possibility that JavaFX never becomes predominant. So, logically, what "Other" possibility is there? That JavaFX is already "the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop apps"? I doubt those who selected "Other" believe that... Perhaps they didn't like or found something to be wrong with the question itself?

Setting aside the (for me) puzzling plurality in favor of "Other" -- the remaining votes tell an interesting story[standard dislaimer: this is not a scientific poll]. Among the people who didn't select "Other," 54% believe that eventually JavaFX will become the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop applications; 30% believe this will never happen; and 15% don't know.

The plan for JavaFX as laid out at last year's JavaOne was encouraging, with JavaFX scheduled to become fully available on Mac OS X and Linux in the coming years. It certainly appears that JavaFX has complete support from Oracle. But, despite this, only a little more than half of the developers who expressed a view are confident that JavaFX will become predominant as thedevelopment platform for Java client/desktop apps.

Given the recent news regarding Project Jigsaw -- that it's now"Late for the train" -- you have to wonder if people have doubts about other elements in the plan for Java that was laid out at JavaOne (less than 10 months ago). Will the full porting of JavaFX to OS X and Linux really happen per the previously-stated schedule?

New poll: Project Jigsaw and Java 8

Our new poll, in fact, asks developers for their view of the Project Jigsaw situation: What's your view of the proposed removal of Project Jigsaw from Java 8? The poll will run until Friday, August 10.


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Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Tori Wieldt's JavaOne: What You Get Is A Lot:

The JavaOne conference brings together Java experts and enthusiasts for an extraordinary week of learning and networking focused entirely on all things Java. With more than 400 sessions covering topics that span the breadth of the Java universe, you can't afford to miss it! September 30 - October 4, 2012, San Francisco. Register now! With a full conference pass, you get...

Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Ken Rimple's Spring Roo and WebFlow. The article is the first in a series that will explore how Spring Roo integrates (and doesn't) with various technologies. This first article discusses Roo and Spring Web Flow.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Who do you believe is this past year's most outstanding JSR spec lead? What's been the most significant JSR over the past year? And who would you select as the JCP member/participant of the year? There's still time to register your views. The JCP Program Office has announced that the nomination period for this year's JCP Awards is extended until next Tuesday, July 31.

Last year's winners included Fujitsu's Mike DeNicola (JCP Program Member of the Year), Oracle's John Rose (Outstanding Spec Lead), and JSR 292 (Most Innovative JSR).

This year's awards are slightly revised. The award categories will be:

  • JCP Member/Participant Of The Year, recognizing the corporate or individual member (either Member or Participant) who has made the most significant positive impact on the community in the past year;
  • Outstanding Spec Lead, recognizing a person who in the past year has uniquely and effectively brought together the combination of qualities necessary for leading a JSR (Java SE, Java EE or Java ME); and
  • Most Significant JSR, recognizing the Spec Lead and Expert Group that have contributed the most significant JSR (either in progress or final) for the Java community (Java SE, Java EE or Java ME) in the past year.

You can submit your nominations using the Java.net JCP Awards nomination form, or by sending your nominations by email to pmo _at_ jcp.org.

This year's winners will be announced during JavaOne, on Tuesday evening, October 2, at the Annual JCP Community party in San Francisco, CA.


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks How long will it take for JavaFX to become the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop apps?. Voting will be open until Friday, July 27.


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:

Our JavaFX poll, which was temporarily closed (while the Duke's Choice Award poll was live), has resumed. The poll will remain open until this coming Friday, July 27.

Specifically, the poll asks "How long will it take for JavaFX to become the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop apps?" Thus far, more than 460 votes have been cast. If you didn't yet register your view, you've still got a few days left to cast your vote.


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, many people have posted new java.net blogs:


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Start Your Week at JavaOne with Java University Preconference Training - With New Sessions Requested By You :

If you attend JavaOne to expand your knowledge and expertise in Java, then why not add a day of in-depth Java training to your itinerary so you can really get the most from your week in San Francisco. This year

The 2012 edition of theOpen Source Convention(OSCON) is under way this week in Portland, Oregon, US. This means that what used to be called OSCON/Java is now also under way. I think it's a good thing that Java and the JVM are no longer a somewhat separate "mini-conference" within OSCON, but instead they're now a "track" within the mainstream conference. The former separation of Java (and also "OSCON/Data") from the main conference implied that these were "candidate" or "emerging" open source realms. But, as Java.net (2,109 active projects as I write this) and many other Java open source project host/repositories illustrate: Java is indeed mainstream with respect to open source. So, I'm pleased to see this change, making Java and the JVM simply a track within the general OSCON conference.

The Java.net community is present at OSCON, and actively documenting their experiences for us. Java.net Community Manager Sonya Barry arrived in Portland on Friday afternoon. In her OSCON 2012 kicks off today! post, she tells us that she attended the Community Leadership Summit on Saturday, and she was going to attend the Ignite talks Monday evening.

Java.net blogger Harold Carr is also at OSCON this year. Harold does an excellent job of documenting the sessions he attends for those of us who weren't able to attend. Thus far, he's documentedOSCON Monday July 16, 2012 (which featured sessions on building apps with MongoDB, getting started with open stack, and Scala koans), and OSCON Tuesday July 17, 2012 (which featured sessions on CSS, building social and personal data apps using the Singly platform, a visit to the OSCON Exhibit Hall, and a party at Puppet Labs).

Sonya also reported on her Tuesday at OSCON:

Tuesday morning I got up bright and early to attend Steve Chin's JavaFX 2.0 tutorial. I've known Steve for several years now, but this is the first time I've sat down in a tutorial/hands-on-lab kind of environment with him to work through a problem. I had a great time, and I learned a lot about the new features of JavaFX...

Tuesday evening we packed up our business cards, stickers, and screen cleaners and headed out to the Expo reception. We spent an hour hanging out in the Oracle booth with a bunch of folks from MySQL, and Oracle Technology Network. I also had a chance to wander around and saw one of the most exciting new things this year - Greenlight for Girls! This week they are doing a "mission to Mars" project with thirty girls age 11 to 15 in the expo hall. On the first day they'll build the mars-scape, and the next day they'll program robots to navigate the terrain. I'm looking forward to watching that come together over the next couple of days.

OSCON is indeed a great convention. I attended it once, and I hope to attend it again -- like, maybe every year going forward! I wish I was there this year, but I'm not (such things happen in life!).

Since I'm not there, I'm very grateful to both Harold and Sonya for taking the time and effort in this tweet-dominated world, and after a long day of conference attendance, to write actualparagraphs that describe their OSCON experiences in ways that permit us to genuinely feel something of what it's like to be at OSCON 2012!


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, several people have posted new java.net blogs:


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Mark Reinhold's There

The winners of the 2012 JAX Innovation Awards were announced this past week. The objective of the awards is simply stated: "Reward those technologies, companies, organisations and individuals that make outstanding contributions to Java." There are three categories of JAX award: Most Innovative Java Technology, Most Innovative Java Company, and Top Java Ambassador. In addition to a winner in each category, one of the finalists who did not win an award is selected to receive a "Special Jury" prize "in acknowledgement of their unique contribution and positive impact on the Java ecosystem."

The five finalists in each award category were invited to attend the JAX Conference in San Francisco, CA. This year's winners each received a $2,500 prize. In case you're not aware of the contributions these organizations and individuals have made to the Java community, here are brief summaries of their accomplishments.

Restructure 101 (winner of the Most Innovative Java Technology award) facilitates the management of large, unstructured code bases. With Restructure 101, developers are able to refactor complex code bases, by taking advantage of visualizations of the code provided by Restructure's Levelized Structure Map (LSM). You can see a Restructure 101 video on the Headways Software products page.

JetBrains(winner of the Most Innovative Java Company award) is well-known as the developer of IntelliJ IDEA; but, the company offers many additional products as well, for example, the TeamCity continuous integration server, the Kotlin language, and IDEs for many other programming languages.

Adam Bien(winner of the Top Java Ambassador award) is a Java Champion who works as a freelance consultant, speaker, and author. Adam's about.adam-bien page lists many more details.

Charles Nutter (winner of the Special Jury award) is a JRuby developer and JVM advocate. Charles tweets as @headius.

Congratulations to all the winners!


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, two people have posted new java.net blogs:


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Java Spotlight Episode 89: Geoff Morton on Java Embedded -

Interview with Geoff Morton, Group Vice President, Worldwide Java Sales at Oracle , on Java embedded. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Dalibor Topic, Java Free and Open Source Software Ambassador and Arun Gupta, Java EE Guy...

Prior to that, we featured Terrence Barr's Java Embedded @ JavaOne: Q & A:

There has been a lot of interest in Java Embedded @ JavaOne since it was announced a short while ago (see my previous post). As this is a new conference we did get a number of questions regarding the conference. So we put together a brief Q & A...

Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Ken Rimple's Spring Roo and WebFlow. The article is the first in a series that will explore how Spring Roo integrates (and doesn't) with various technologies. This first article discusses Roo and Spring Web Flow.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Our recently completed poll about the Adopt OpenJDK project suggests that the project is gaining some visibility among Java developers, but there's a large group that isn't all that familiar with the project. A total of 428 votes were cast. The exact question and results were:

What's your view of the Adopt OpenJDK project?

  • 17% (74 votes) - It's a great idea - I plan to participate
  • 7% (29 votes) - It's a great idea, but I probably won't participate
  • 2% (7 votes) - It's probably a good thing
  • 1% (3 votes) - I don't think it will gain much
  • 18% (77 votes) - What's the Adopt OpenJDK project?
  • 3% (13 votes) - I don't know
  • 53% (225 votes) - Other

The Adopt OpenJDK project is so new that the high number of people who selected the non-specific options perhaps should not surprise us. The results (which, of course, are not scientific) imply that the news about AdoptOpenJDK's existence has not yet expanded such that the general developer is aware of it.

Among the voters who expressed knowledge about what the Adopt OpenJDK project is, a significant majority consider the project a great idea, including a large group of developers who applaud the project even though they doubt they'll personally be participating in it.

Projects like Adopt OpenJDK and Adopt-a-JSR, along with the JCP.next effort, are the cutting edge of an attempt to transform the way Java evolves from a fairly closed system where a few people make all the decisions (what it's been in the past) into an open, community-driven process, where anyone can participate, all the key discussions are public, anyone can submit comments, etc.

How can this be a bad thing? Well, yes, 10 Million Java developers all speaking out simultaneously would be a problem. But, that's unlikely to happen.

The fact is: the world has changed. In today's world, people like to be able to customize their own systems. Allowing developers to participate in the future evolution of Java and the JVM brings Java into the modern context of customer-driven product enhancement. That's a very good thing for Java's future, in my view. In fact, without these changes, I think Java would likely stagnate.

New poll: how long before JavaFX dominates?

Our new Java.net poll asks How long will it take for JavaFX to become the most widely used development platform for Java client/desktop apps?. Voting will be open until Friday, July 20.


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, two people have posted new java.net blogs:


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Guillaume Laforge's report, Groovy 2.0 Released:

The Groovy development team and SpringSource are happy to echo the announcement of the release of Groovy 2.0, the highly popular dynamic language for the Java platform. The key highlights of this important milestone are...

Previously, we featured Zoran Pavlovi?'s Zoran Pavlovi?: Top 5 JavaFX Tutorials for June 2012:

This month was pretty busy for me, I wrote a lot of JavaFX tutorials and few other articles. I had a lot of visits this month on this blog. So, I decide to share top 5 JavaFX 2 tutorials for this month...

Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Ken Rimple's Spring Roo and WebFlow. The article is the first in a series that will explore how Spring Roo integrates (and doesn't) with various technologies. This first article discusses Roo and Spring Web Flow.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

Our most recently completed Java.net poll did not reveal a clear consensus among developers regarding a specific Java DB improvement or new feature they consider to be most important. A total of 212 votes were cast in the poll, and three comments were posted. The exact question and results were:

  • 20% (42 votes) - More performance monitors
  • 3% (6 votes) - User-defined aggregates
  • 10% (22 votes) - Full outer join
  • 7% (14 votes) - Enable/disable triggers and constraints
  • 8% (17 votes) - Spatial datatypes
  • 3% (7 votes) - Expression indexes
  • 6% (13 votes) - Better concurrency for identity columns
  • 8% (18 votes) - Other
  • 34% (73 votes) - I don't know

We don't have too many polls where "I don't know" is the top choice. Among those who knew what new feature or improvement they'd like to see in Java DB, a plurality favored more performance monitors, with the remaining choices receiving a scattering of votes.

The three comments suggested three additional desired improvements or new features: synchronization with 'master' database; DERBY-5356 - better space reclamation; and full text search.

Current poll: Adopt OpenJDK project

Our current Java.net poll asks What's your view of the Adopt OpenJDK project?. Voting will be open until Friday, July 6.


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, Larry Fernandez and Frans Thamura have posted new java.net blogs:


Java News

Here are the stories we've recently featured in our Java news section:


Articles

Our latest Java.net article is Ken Rimple's Spring Roo and WebFlow. The article is the first in a series that will explore how Spring Roo integrates (and doesn't) with various technologies. This first article discusses Roo and Spring Web Flow.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. You can find historical archives of what has appeared the front page of Java.net in the java.net home page archive.

-- Kevin Farnham
Twitter: @kevin_farnham

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