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Jfokus Embedded 2013 was a pretty amazing mini-conference! It happened within the broader Jfokus 2013 Conference. During the afternoon coffee break on the last day of the conference, Andrzej Grzesik, an organizer of GeeCON, Polish Java User Group, Krakow Software Craftsmanship, and the Crakow Hadoop User Group, introduced us toAirCasting.

So, what's AirCasting? It's an embedded app for Android that reads data from sensors that record environmental data (and, optionally, heart rate data) as you move in your environment.

Using just an Android phone and the AirCasting Air Monitor, you can create a data stream that is uploaded to the AirCasting web site.

The AirCasting web site aggregates all the data it receives and creates maps that display the collected data.

What's incredibly interesting about this is the potential for people to contribute to scientific databases simply by going about their normal daily business in conjunction with utilizing the capabilities of fairly inexpensive sensors and modern embedded technology! If you'd like to participate, please visit AirCasting.org, and get started!


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-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

One of my favorite sessions at Jfokus 2013 was presented by Typesafe co-founder and Java Champion Jonas Bon

In the last-completed Java.net poll, the community indicated that it overwhelmingly anticipates that Java 8 will be released this September. Meanwhile, our current poll, which has less than a week to go, asks for your view of the recently-released NetBeans Version 7.3.

A total of 1178 votes were cast in the Java 8 poll. The exact question and results were:

Will Java 8 be released in September 2013 (as is currently scheduled)?

  • 83% (981 votes) - Yes
  • 5% (54 votes) - Probably
  • 4% (49 votes) - Probably not
  • 3% (31 votes) - No
  • 5% (63 votes) - 63

So, as I said, the sentiment is pretty overwhelmingly in the direction of Java 8 being released in September. The usual caveat (that this isn't a scientific poll) applies, of course. Still, a result like this leaves not much to write about with respect to post-poll analysis!

New poll: NetBeans Version 7.3

Our current poll asks NetBeans 7.3 has been called "the most interesting release ever"; what's your view?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 22.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

http://jdc2013.egjug.org/files/JDC_Logo-01-150_1_0.pngEgypt is frequently in the news these days, and some of the reasons surely are not comforting. But on Friday and Saturday, March 8-9, there was a lot to be happy about at the Cairo International Conference Center. There, the Egyptian Java User Group was hosting the Java Developers Conference(JDC), which, from looking at the related tweets (search for #jdc2013or view @egjdc), came off as successfully (or even moreso) than prior year editions!

The conference featured 40 sessions, with 20 sessions happening each day, and four sessions happening simultaneously. Yes, attendees had to look at the conference agenda (PDF) and make some tough decisions about what to see and what not to see. The conference sessions ran from 9:30 AM through 9:00 PM -- a long day indeed, as Enas Sharaf tweeted at the end of the conference:

Heading to home after a hard day with awesome people @ #jdc2013 Thank u guys :) @egjdc @trendingdig http://4sq.com/16gWkNy

http://egjug.org/files/eg-jug-2.pngEGJUG leader Ahmed Ali expected more than 600 Java professionals to attend, making JDC 2013 the biggest Java conference in the Middle East. The conference sessions covered topics ranging from JBoss, to Java Web App security, to Java EE development productivy, to WebSocket, to OpenShift, HTML5, performance tuning, Spring, Android, JVM languages, Java Heap, Java EE 7, Asha, the Cloud, Hadoop, Play... I think you get the idea. Java Developer Conference 2013 was a major event, and assuredly all who attended came away with some new ideas they can put to use in their everyday work.

Sponsorship of JDC 2013 was quite diverse, a testament to the organizational skills of Ahmed and the EGJUG JDC team. Nokia was the Platinum sponsor; ITWORX, redhat, Microsoft, and Eitesal were Gold sponsors; Oracle was a Silver sponsor; and there were additional sponsors as well.

Some JDC 2013 speakers are already posting their slides, and announcing that via the Twitter #jdc2013hash tag. @egjdcnotes:

Don't forget, follow us on our Youtube channel and we will publish JDC 2012 and JDC 2013 videos one by one. http://fb.me/1nhiWfZVw

The Egyptian Java User Group amazes me. I look forward to reporting on many JDCs in the future. Maybe, some day, I'll even be able to attend one! Great work, Ahmed and the EGJUG!


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

The results of the last-completed Java.net poll indicate that the attention being given to the Internet of Things (IoT) and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication at recent conferences like JavaOne and Jfokus (both of which included an Embedded Java mini-conference) is much warranted. A total of 464 votes were cast in the poll. The exact question and results were:

What's your view on the future of machine-to-machine (M2M) interaction, also known as the Internet of Things (IoT)?

  • 70% (325 votes) - Growth in this area will explode in the next decade or so
  • 6% (30 votes) - It will gain more attention now, but the inherent problems will limit growth
  • 3% (12 votes) - I don't expect much change from where things stand now
  • 5% (22 votes) - These are just the latest meaningless buzzwords
  • 3% (12 votes) - I don't know what will happen in this technology space
  • 6% (27 votes) - I have no idea what this terminology refers to
  • 8% (36 votes) - Other

These results surprise me. While Java.net polls aren't scientific, when I create them, my intention is always to have a selection of options each of which will be representative of the views of quite a few people. If I make a poll, and a strong majority selects a single option, I wonder if perhaps I could have, or should have tried to, divide that option into multiple options. Of course, that's not always readily possible, logically.

In the case of this poll, it does surprise me that such a strong majority thinks growth in the M2M/IoT/embedded area will "explode" in the next decade. I attended many Jfokus Embedded sessions earlier this month, and in those sessions many of the speakers talked about the unique problems the embedded area entails -- ranging from proprietary protocols that have long been in place, to government regulations, to the vast variety of hardware platforms, ... There are a great many issues that are difficult to deal with could really hamper progress in this area, from what I heard at Jfokus Embedded. That, of course, was my reason for the second option: "It will gain more attention now, but the inherent problems will limit growth." But only 6% of voters selected that.

It was encouraging that only 6% of voters were unaware of the terminology. But, we also don't know what the people who selected "Other" think (no comments were posted); and, many people who didn't know what the poll question was about probably simply chose not to cast a vote.

Current poll: Java 8 release schedule

Our current Java.net poll asks: Will Java 8 be released in September 2013 (as is currently scheduled)? The poll will be open until Friday, March 8.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

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