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Based on the results of the last-completed Java.net poll, this year's JavaOne in San Francisco, CA is going to be a huge success. Of course, Java.net polls aren't scientific, but it's still surprising when developers overwhelmingly select a single option in a poll. A total of 2146 votes were cast in the poll, making this one of the more popular polls in recent months.

The exact question and results were:

Do you plan to attend a conference or other developer event in the coming year?

  • 95% (2030 votes) - I plan to attend JavaOne in San Francisco
  • 1% (14 votes) - I plan to attend a regional JavaOne
  • 1% (15 votes) - I plan to attend other Java conferences
  • 0% (9 votes) - I plan to attend Java User Group events
  • 1% (18 votes) - Multiple of the above
  • 2% (42 votes) - I probably won't attend any developer events
  • 1% (18 votes) - I don't know yet

Clearly the percentages don't come anywhere close to representing the plans of the broader Java/JVM developer community. I don't expect to see 95% of the global Java developer community at JavaOne this fall! And, from what I've seen in the past, the regional JavaOnes and other Java conferences are pretty well attended.

I would actually guess that, in the case of this poll, the option that received the fewest votes ("I plan to attend Java User Group events") likely represents the activity that will engage more Java developers in the coming year than any of the other options. Global Java User Group meeting attendance should easily exceed conference attendance, I'd think.

So, this is an unusual result. Still, the high vote count implies that there is a lot of enthusiasm and anticipation related to this fall's JavaOne in San Francisco. I'm certainly looking forward to it myself!

New poll: Adopt-a-JSR

Our current poll asks How familiar are you with the Adopt-a-JSR program?. Voting will be open until Friday, May 3.


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-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

http://www.egjug.org/files/eg-jug-2.pngAhmed Ali leads the very active Egyptian Java User Group (EGJUG). EGJUG recently organized Java Developers Conference 2013, the largest Java conference in the Middle East. The conference was, once again, a huge success.

In this second Java.net "Lightning Interview" I asked Ahmed the same questions I asked London Java Community (LJC) co-leader Martijn Verburg (@karianna) in the first Lightning Interview.

1. Why did you decide to start and co-lead the EGJUG?

Ahmed: I joined EGJUG because it is the only Java community in Egypt and one of the top active communities as well. I decided to lead the Egyptian JUG because I believe it is a very valuable community to the Egyptian Java developers. EGJUG has supported students and developers in learning Java programming and other technologies for years. I participated for a long time in managing the monthly meeting, and every time I organized a meeting I felt excited and became more enthusiastic about working with the JUG as volunteer. When the JUG founder (Ahmed Hashim) decided to quit, I realized I was one of the top contributors in the EGJUG's activities. I didn't hesitate a second to propose to take the leadership.

http://jdc2013.egjug.org/files/JDC_Logo-01-150_1_0.png2. If someone wants to start a JUG, what obstacle that they might not think about in advance would you recommend that they prepare for?

Ahmed: Leading a JUG is not an easy job and there are many things to consider before you start.

  1. Will you be able to get a free venue to host your meetings?
  2. Do you have technical people available to speak in your meetings?
  3. Will you have all your meetings in one place, or do you have to cover a big geographical area?
  4. Who will support the JUG with books, promotional materials, and cover the monthly meeting cost?


 

3. Once a JUG has been started, it needs to acquire a core membership, and some corporate sponsorship is also quite beneficial. Do you have a few comments about sustaining and growing a JUG in relation to these areas?

Ahmed: Sustaining and growing the JUG doesn't require a lot of money or sponsorship. In EGJUG we host our event at Cairo University for free and we make it free to attend. Also our speakers are volunteers, which makes it very enjoyable, since everybody comes for one purpose: to help the community. It depends on your country, but in Egypt it is difficult to have membership fees; however, it might be accepted if you charged the attendees for a specific session.

Thanks,
Ahmed


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

In the most recently completed Java.net poll, developers overwhelmingly considered the HTML 5 related enhancements in Java EE 7 to be the most important. The poll highlighted five of the many areas of enhancement that will be included in Java EE 7, and provided a "Something else" option as well. The 1631 votes that were cast represent one of the highest totals for recent Java.net polls.

The exact question and results were:

What's the most important enhancement in Java EE 7?

  • 90% (1475 votes) - HTML 5 support (Websockets and JSON-P)
  • 3% (46 votes) - JSF 2.2
  • 1% (21 votes) - JMS 2.0
  • 2% (37 votes) - JAX-RS 2.0
  • 2% (27 votes) - Expression Language 3.0
  • 2% (25 votes) - Something else

With 90% of the voting going to one poll option, there really isn't much to discuss regarding this poll. Of course, Java.net polls are not scientific -- the usual caveat. Still, an unusually large number of votes were cast for HTML 5 support.

The large number of votes suggests that Java EE 7 is a topic of fairly broad interest. Although pjmlp expressed doubts, commenting:

I wonder how relevant Java EE 7 can be, when most companies are still migrating to Java EE 5 stacks.

kithouna took issue with that comment, stating:

That's not my experience! Most companies I know are at least on Java EE 5 and many on Java EE 6. Don't forget that Java EE 5 is from 2006. It's just a few percent of the companies that run on truly ancient technology.

New poll: Do you plan to attend an upcoming conference?

With all the recent conversation about JavaOnes around the world and other conferences, it seemed a good time to ask if you're planning to attend an upcoming conference. Our current poll asks Do you plan to attend a conference or other developer event in the coming year?. Voting will be open until Friday, April 19.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

This is the first of what I hope will become a series of interviews with members of the Java community. By calling them "lightning interviews," I mean that they'll be brief and to the point, "short takes" focused on a specific topic that's relevant to the broader Java/JVM community -- the interview equivalent of Lightning Talks.

I'm hoping that by making the interviews brief (three questions), it will be more readily possible to do lots of them. People are busy, and I've found that asking someone to respond to a longish list of questions can result in their never finding the time to respond. Another benefit of the "lightning interview" approach is that the interviews are also quick reads, something you can easily fit into a short break from work.

Martijn Verburg

Martijn Verburg (@karianna) is co-leader of the London Java Community (LJC), a speaker and author (think "Diabolical Developer"), and an Adopt-a-JSR andAdopt OpenJDKorganizer and evangelist. He's also a JavaOne Rock Star and a Java Champion. In his spare time, Martijn works as CTO at jClarity.

1. Why did you decide to start and co-lead the LJC (London Java Community)?

Martijn: There are approximately 50,000 Java/JVM developers in London, and there was no central place for them to talk to each other and share their ideas and love for the technology. That just seemed bizarre to me. Many developers that I talked to were also pretty miserable in their day jobs. We wanted to bring inspiration back into their technical lives.

2. If someone wants to start a JUG, what obstacle that they might not think about in advance would you recommend that they prepare for?

Martijn: "If you build it, they will come" doesn't work in all cultures and all geographical locations. The sheer amount of time and effort you need to put in upfront in order to build a community that sustains itself is often overwhelming!

3. Once a JUG has been started, it needs to acquire a core membership, and some corporate sponsorship is also quite beneficial. Do you have a few comments about sustaining and growing a JUG in relation to these areas?

Martijn: Keep the events fresh, varied and interesting. We have a large and diverse membership base and having just the standard talk once a fortnight doesn't cut it anymore. So we run code and coffee, a book club, code shares, regular talks, hackdays, a small open conference, etc., as well as regular talks/presentations.

Be wary of sponsors. They must be held to the same high standards as any other technical member in your community. That means no product pitches, no unsolicited mail outs etc. The good sponsors understand that by being part of the community they get far more loyalty and warm leads than if they're seen as a cynical outsider.

Cheers,
Martijn

[Editor's Note: Originally, I was going to call these "Flash Interviews"; after further reflection, I decided that calling them "Lightning Interviews" was better, both to avoid confusing search engines into thinking the interviews are about the Flash technology, and to associate the interviews with the Lightning Talks that are often featured at technology conferences.]


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

Last week, JFrog's online software binaries repository Bintray was made available to the public. What's Bintray? JFrog's announcement calls it "the first social platform for developers to publish, download, store, promote, and share software libraries (binaries) across a unified community." One way of looking at Bintray is that it's a "GitHub for binaries."

Bintray already has some major users. For example, Netflix is distributing its denominatorexecutable JAR package through Bintray. Denominator "is a building block for portably controlling DNS mappings across cloud providers. denominator exposes features present on a subset of DNS providers, such as GEO or Latency mapping."

As you can see in the image, Bintray has a social aspect as well. In fact, its design illustrates how some of the communication techniques that have been made popular by social networking sites like Facebook can be put to good use by cloud-based platforms that serve the needs of developers. For example, the Netflix Open Source Projects page includes a feed that shows the organization's latest activity (repositories created, packages created, etc.).

And, as a registered user, you can join, watch, or message other users. So, for example, say you're interested in knowing when Netflix OSS adds a new binary to Bintray. All you have to do is watch them, and you'll be notified whenever that happens.

After I created my account, I saw a message "Try out the JCenter repository if you're here for Java packages!" There, I found that more than 44,000 Java packages are already on Bintray!

Under the Bintray hood

After looking at some of the HTML source for Bintray pages, I became curious about the site's underlying technology. So, I asked JFrog co-Founder and CTO Yoav Landman about this. I think Java developers will find his answer quite interesting:

Bintray is composed of a clustered web layer that serves all UI and REST interactions, and of an independent, multi-datacenter download service.

The web layer is written using Grails and Jersey. It interacts with an ElasticSearch cluster for searches and with a MongoDB backend cluster for persistency. Grails' GORM is heavily used with some own customizations.

A thin download service utilizes Nginx, Grizzly and Jersey, talking to CouchDB clusters and to a distributed Object Store that is synced up to the CDN.

Redis with the lightweight Jedis java client library is used for job management, such as building repository indexes and stats aggregation.

Bintray is hosted on a multi-cloud environment, composed of both dedicated, physical servers and cloud instances.

That's a pretty Java-laden set of infrastructure! Not that this should surprise us, given JFrog's prominence in the Java community. Maybe the JFrog team will consider giving a presentation on how they put all this together at JavaOne this September. That would be a very interesting session, and the JavaOne Call for Papers is still open!

For more information, read the Bintray release announcement -- or even better, join Bintray and get started.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

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