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The most recently completed Java.net poll, which was submitted by Walter Nyland, asked the community about which technologies represent the future of the view layer in Java EE apps. A total of 245 votes were cast in the Java 8 poll, and two comments were posted. The exact question and results were:

What's the future of the view layer in Java EE applications?

  • 26% (64 votes) - Java EE component libraries will continue to dominate
  • 40% (99 votes) - HTML5, especially AngularJS, is and will be the dominant view layer
  • 6% (14 votes) - Neither the front-end nor the back-end of Java EE will survive HTML5
  • 5% (12 votes) - Mobile front-ends will be the only lasting view layer
  • 8% (20 votes) - Some other technology will replace the view layer
  • 9% (22 votes) - Java EE never had a significant place in the Java ecosystem, ever
  • 6% (14 votes) - Other

One thing this result implies is that HTML5 is gaining traction, or developers expect that it will do so over time. This confirms the fairly revolutionary nature of HTML5, and it also confirms that many developers know enough about it to consider it the future of the view layer in Java EE apps.

It's not too surprising (in my opinion) that "Java EE component libraries" finished in a strong second place. When you think about existing applications, and existing libraries that teams have used and built into their Java EE applications over years of effort, in many cases it's going to be easier for companies to utilize their existing code as the starting point in new applications, compared with starting from scratch with HTML5.

Together, HTML5 and Java EE component libraries captured about 2/3 of the votes. No other option achieved a double-digit percent.

Some of Walter's options provided developers with an opportunity to critique Java EE's own future with the context of this poll. For example, 6% believe that "Neither the front-end nor the back-end of Java EE will survive HTML5"; 8% think the whole concept of a "view layer" will become obsolete ("Some other technology will replace the view layer"); and 9% chose "Java EE never had a significant place in the Java ecosystem, ever."

6% of the votes went to "Other" and the two thoughtful comments may have come from this group. gkbrown commented:

"There should not be any view layer in Java EE. Java EE should be a service-provider tier that any type of client (HTML, native, etc.) can communicate with."

Meanwhile, tbee said:

Pure client side rendering has its place but also many drawbacks, where security sensitivities are probably one of the most important issues, but unpredictable performance is a good second. So I do not believe server side HTML generation will go anywhere soon, but I'm highly in doubt if it will be JSF. More of the logic will move to the front end, and JSF is not well suited for that, but not as far as Angular.js wants it.

Thanks again to Walter Nyland for providing us with a great poll!

New poll: Java 8

Java 8 is here, so now is a good time to get some initial impressions. Our current poll asks How significant is the Java 8 release?. Voting will be open until Friday, April 4.

What Java.net poll would you like to see?

If you have a poll idea, get in touch with me by commenting on this blog post, or by sending an email to editor _at_ java.net, or by using our Submit Article/Blog form.


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-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

The official launch of Java 8 is now less than a week away. The Java 8 Launch Webcast will take place at 10:00 AM Pacific Standard Time (PST) on Tuesday, March 25. The launch event will include a welcome and overview by Mark Reinhold, a panel discussion on Java SE 8 new features and enhancements, a chat with Twitter CIO Adam Messinger, discussion by Java community leaders, a Java ME 8 overview, and a panel discussion on Java 8 and the Internet of Things (IoT). Portions of the session will include Q&A discussion via Twitter (#Java8QA).

Actually, while the official launch of Java 8 is a week away, the Java SE 8 JDK, Server JRE 8, and JRE 8 can already be downloaded, for those who want to get a head start. A packaged NetBeans 8 and JDK 8 download is also available.

You can find links to lots of Java 8 related content (as well as other items of interest to Java/JVM developers) in the March issue of the Java Developer Newsletter, which just came out.

Meanwhile, the jaxenter team has announced that JAX Magazine goes Java 8 crazy this March. The issue will be focused almost entirely on Java 8 and the adaptations widely used platforms are making in response.

A search for "Java 8" at news.google.com returns plenty more interesting content, including a JavaWorld article about a survey run by TypeSafe where 54% of developers said they plan to upgrade to Java 8 within a year of its release.

If you've been too busy to follow Java 8 developments closely, attending next Tuesday's Java 8 Launch Webcast will be a great way to get you started.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. To follow Java.net net on Twitter, follow @javanetbuzz.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

http://jenkins-ci.org/sites/default/files/images/headshot.pngIn the most recently completed Java.net poll, the community selected Jenkins as its preferred Continuous Integration (CI) server. This was the third in a series of Java.net polls related to Java tools. A total of 260 votes were cast in the poll.

The exact question and results were:

Which Continuous Integration (CI) server do you prefer?

  • 7% (17 votes) - Bamboo
  • 1% (2 votes) - Continuum
  • 2% (6 votes) - CruiseControl
  • 8% (20 votes) - Hudson
  • 50% (130 votes) - Jenkins
  • 0% (0 votes) - Pulse
  • 7% (19 votes) - TeamCity
  • 1% (3 votes) - Another CI server
  • 24% (63 votes) - I don't use a CI server

headius commented: "No mention of TravisCI?" There are likely some others I missed as well...

The usual caveat applies: this is not a scientific poll. Still, my guess is that the result probably is fairly representative of what's actually happening among development teams. There are many CI servers, but Jenkins seems to receive the most attention and commentary among the sources I follow in selecting interesting material for the Java.net home page.

If we remove the 24% of voters who said they don't use a CI server, then the result is even more impressive for Jenkins: among the voters who use CI servers, 66% selected Jenkins.

New poll: Java EE view layer

Our current poll asks What's the future of the view layer in Java EE applications?. Voting will be open until Friday, March 21.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. To follow Java.net net on Twitter, follow @javanetbuzz.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

The past three Java.net polls have been related to Java tools. We've run two polls related to Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), and our current poll asks Which Continuous Integration (CI) server do you prefer? That poll will be ending on Friday. After that, we'll run one more poll related to Java tools. What class of tool would you like that poll to be about? This is your last chance (for a while) to suggest a Java tools poll. What do you want to ask the community (related to Java tools)?

If you'd like to suggest a poll, think of a good question about a category of tools, then come up with some response options that more or less cover the spectrum of the answers developers might most likely expect to see. The poll question should not be about a single tool, but rather about a category of tool. It might be interesting to find out how developers rate something about tools that compete with one another; or the poll could simply ask which tool/framework/platform within a given category developers use the most.

If you have a suggestion for a poll, you can either post it as a comment to this blog, or send it as an email message to editor __at__ java.net.


Subscriptions and Archives: You can subscribe to this blog using the java.net Editor's Blog Feed. You can also subscribe to the Java Today RSS feedand the java.net blogs feed. To follow Java.net net on Twitter, follow @javanetbuzz.

-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)

http://www.javaland.eu/fileadmin/templates/JavaLand/img/logo_javaland.gifIn late January I considered what I'd do if I had several free months to wander Europe. A look at the Lanyard Java Conferences calendar gave me a great idea: I could wander through Europe from Java conference to Java conference, while also enjoying everything in between! My imaginary trip started in Stockholm, Sweden, with Jfokus 2014. I'm now traveling 1400 km southwest, to Br

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