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I am excited to share that I got an opportunity to observe and participate in an Oracle Code Innovate Event for FedEx Supply Chain in Cranberry, PA a couple of weeks back. It is a three day Hackfest, where several teams of FedEx engineers work with Oracle techies to design and test drive real use cases in the Oracle Cloud.

 

Oracle Code Innovate.JPG

 

The program was guided by Matt Thompson, a Developer Evangelist along with Mat Viera and Emily Huegel as Scrum masters as well as Linda Bronson and a whole support team. It is a three day program that broke down as follows:

 

 

Day One: Ideation

 

Day Two: Iteration

 

Day Three: Innovation

 

 

For each customer what they want to get out of the Code Innovate experience differs. For FedEx the management/engineers wanted to see what code (and specifically Micro-services and Containers) goes through to get get deployed in the cloud through a Continuous Integration- Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) pipeline and in some cases using Kubernetes as the Orchestration tool for Containers.

 

There were 20 engineers broken up into four teams. Each team had to come up with a creative Team Name, Goal (Use Case) and the Tasks that were required to implement the Use Case. Matt Thompson emphasized that unlike tutorials and workshops, this is a true Peer-Peer relationship where both FedEx and Oracle engineers work together and learn from each other. In addition to assigned Oracle engineers to each team, the SE lead Moe Khan and Architects like Brad Egler floated around the different teams to help them if they were getting stuck or just needed some strategic guidance.

 

In a Hackathon there is always a clear winner, but the emphasis in a Hackfest even though there is competition and awards is on collaboration. The focus is on learning and Matt emphasized to the engineers to get out of their comfort zones and to grapple new areas in which they were not well versed.

 

On day one, Matt gave an overview of the program followed up by an Oracle engineer who gave a tutorial on Terraform.  Terraform is a CI/CD Infrastructure as Code tool, that all the teams used to deploy their micro-services. Then the teams broke up and started the Ideation phase, with lots of Post It’s in hand and trying to come up with as many ideas as possible. When the time was up, they then started to converge on the idea they wanted to pursue. In the afternoon the teams got together in their huddles and started to drill down on the tasks and  becoming familiar with the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI) dashboard with the help of Oracle engineers.

 

oracle code innovate 2.jpg

 

At the end of day one, the teams had to do a Check-Out true to Agile and then at the beginning of day two a Check-In to make sure nothing had changed in terms of goals and tasks and everything was on track. Day Two was heads down all coding. The mood was intense and Matt shared with the teams that it’s ok at times to feel overwhelmed but that there is plenty of supporting help.

Day three was dedicated to wrapping up coding by lunch and to start preparing the presentations and in the afternoon to give the Lightning Talks. There were three FedEx judges all from management who just like on "America's Got Talent" were asking tough questions. Every team prevailed and won a different type of award.

 

At the end of the event the feedback from both management and the engineers was overwhelmingly positive, not only because they accomplished their goal but the whole experience.  Besides FedEx, companies such as GE, Cisco, McAfee, and others have seen the benefit of participating in Code Innovate. Check out the following link if you would like to learn more about participating in an Oracle Code Innovate program.

Stories are a window into life. They can if they resonate provide insights into our own lives or the lives of others.They can help us transmit  knowledge, pass on traditions, solve present day problems or allow us to imagine alternate realities. Open Source software is an example of an alternate reality in software development, where proprietary has been replaced in large part with sharing code that is free and open. How is this relevant to not only developers but people who work in technology? It is human nature that we continue to want to grow, learn and share. For my work, as a Community Manager I get to interview speakers at various Oracle and other conferences. That is great but everyone is not a speaker. For them, I started 60 Second Developer Stories. I have a mobile kit when I am on the road that consists of just my iPhone, microphone and a mono-pod and anyone who wants to can come and share their story. Below are some of the ideas I give as a suggestion, as well as some FAQs. I look forward to meeting you at a future User Group Meeting, Oracle Code event, Oracle CodeOne, Oracle Open World or another event.

 

60 second developer story.JPG

 

  •       Share what you learned on your first job
  •       Share a best coding practice.
  •       Explain how  a tool or technology works
  •       What have you learned recently about building an App?
  •       Share a work related accomplishment
  •       What's the best decision you ever made?
  •       What’s the worst mistake you made and the lesson learned?
  •       What is one thing you learned from a mentor or peer that has really helped you?
  •       Any story that you want to share and community can benefit from

 

Here are some FAQs about the 60 Second Developer Story

 

Q1. I am too shy, and as this is live what if I get it wrong?

A1. It is your story, there is no right or wrong. If you mess up, it’s not a problem we can do a retake.

 

Q2. There are so many stories, how do I pick one?

A2. Share something specific an event that has a beginning, middle an end. Ideally there was a challenge or obstacle and you overcame it. As long as it is meaningful to you it is worth sharing.

 

Q3. What if it’s not exactly 60 seconds, if it’s shorter or longer?

A3. 60 Seconds is a guideline. I will usually show you a cue-card to let you know when you have 30 secs. and 15 secs. left. A little bit over or under is not a big deal.

 

Q4. When can I see the results?

A4. Usually immediately. Whatever Periscope/Twitter handle we are sharing on, plus if you have a personal Twitter handle, we tweet that before you go live, so it will show up on your feed.

 

Q4. What if I am not a Developer?

A5. We use Developer in a broad sense. It doesn’t matter if you are a DBA or Analyst, or whatever. If you are involved with technology and have a story to share, we want to hear it.

I just returned from a long overseas trek at a couple of Oracle OpenWorld and Code events. A big thank you to all the folks who helped set things up, the guests and speakers who attended. While staying in one of the cities (neither the city nor the hotel will be named), I had one of those frustrating experiences and then an aha moment, that I wanted to share.

 

I check into one of the well known brands of hotels that we are all familiar with and as I enter the room, I struggle to figure out how to get the lights on and what buttons control what lights. This is not unique, it has happened at other places I have stayed at and I am sure you have experienced.

Then I enter the bathroom, just to check it out and realize after closing the door, I am not able to open it. I play with this unique door handle and struggle to figure it out. Is this a prelude for things to come? Well yes, I get into the shower without too much thought as it has been a long 12+ hour flight. I start to look for the shower faucet and nothing in sight. I touch every chrome fitting hoping for a miracle but no luck. Eventually I see that all the controls instead of being in the front are on the side behind me. I turn the shower on, and all I get for the longest time is cold water, and given I have to leave for a meeting, I have to endure it. Later on when I return, I am using the WC (don't worry nothing graphic here), and I try to feel my way to the toilet roll holder which  is behind me, and while trying to get to it many times end up dislodging the phone which happens to be there, and then try to save it from falling in. Don't worry I caught it every time.

 

I don't know if this was something unique to that chain of hotels, the city, country, but what it reminded me off, was the importance of User Experience (UX) Design. I know UI and UX are used by lay people like me, interchangeably, so I won't go there. This in turn reminded me of an interview I did with Shakeeb Rahman about UX Design. Rather than rehash it, I will just share it below. So my parting thoughts are just this, the key thing is no matter what a engineer or developer designs, software, video games, cars, hotels, or anything that a human has a touchpoint with,  thought given to how the product or service will be used can go a long way in avoiding frustration and providing customer satisfaction. Please make things intuitive and "Go Shakeeb!"

The industrial revolution of the 18th century automated pretty much every aspect of society from agriculture to transportation. Fast forward to the present and “Autonomous” technology is again changing everything. Even though most of us may not be able to afford a Tesla, we are all aware of it’s capabilities. By moving from a fossil-fuel based car to an all electric, digital, software controlled vehicle, the very experience of driving has been changed.

In Autonomous mode, not only Tesla but the cars of the future are able to self-navigate, self-park, and pretty much self-maintain themselves. Gone are oil-changes and tune-ups. The paradigm has shifted.

 

That shift now of Autonomous is being applied to the “traditional” datacenter. Whatever was routine and monotonous is being replaced by automation. We see that with DevOps where with Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment the role of the Ops engineer and SysAdmin has changed. Similarly with the advent of the Autonomous Database from Oracle, the world of the DBA will change. No longer will they have to worry about the monotonous things like patching, backup and tuning databases. Instead they will be able to focus more on the business and higher value tasks including architecture, SLAs, and just overall getting more value from data.

 

autonomous_database_vision.png

 

Oracle Autonomous Database services for transaction processing and data warehousing are Self-Driving, Self-Securing and Self-Repairing. Whether you are a SysAdmin or a DBA, change can be scary. Rest assured though whether it be the Auto-pilot in a cockpit, or a Self-driving car or an Autonomous database the need for human oversight and touch will remain. If you drive a Tesla or have test-driven one, you will know the “Back to the Future” feeling of that rush and that quote from the movie, “Roads? Where we're going we don't need roads.” Here is to the future and if you want a test-drive check out this link Oracle Autonomous Database.

The  following is an edited interview with Chris Thalinger, the founder of LavaOne being held on the beautiful island of Oahu in Hawaii.

Chris.JPG

 

JM This is the second year of LavaOne. What was and is your vision behind starting this unconference?

CT Having lived in Hawaii, and noticing that more workers are remote, I thought it would be great to put Hawaii on the map. Hawaii is mainly known as a tourist destination and I wanted to start an event that would let local college students see that something is happening here. I want to help the local Hawaiian community get better jobs on the island.

 

JM You are building a community here, what word in the Hawaiian language reflects this?

CT It is probably Ohana.  Ohana means family, but it can extend beyond that to include members who cooperate with one another, and that is exactly what we do.

 

JM What are the challenges you are facing to start a community here?

CT Just the name “Hawaii” has a stigma attached to it. As Hawaii  is a tourist destination, it is seen as just a place for having fun on the beach. I want to turn that around. I want Hawaii to be perceived like any another state which has a technology hub.

 

JM If you were to try and capture the state of affairs of Hawaii technology wise and socially how would you describe it?

CT There are at least three universities in Hawaii and each has a Computer Science department, which is awesome. The challenge is that to get goods jobs, people go to the mainland and so we have a brain-drain going on. Also with Hawaii being a tourist destination, everything is expensive, that makes it harder for locals. There are people coming from the mainland to retire here, and the twist is, as it is getting too expensive here local retirees are moving away from the island and going to the mainland.

 

JM How are you reaching out to the developer community and college students?

CT When I first started this, it was very hard to reach developers. Over time I am learning about the different channels, everything from Slack, to 1990s Bulletin boards and more.

 

JM Are you modeling this unconference after another event?

CT JCrete is an uncoference that happens on the island of Crete in July. I thought it would be great to do something in January on another island, in this case  it is in Oahu.

 

JM Looking ahead how do you see the event going forward?

CT Besides having an increasing number of participants  and after reaching a certain threshold we may alternate the conference vs unconference format. To get more college student participation we may have to move from North Shore and closer to Honolulu where the universities are.

 

JM For those who read this blog post and want to help, what are the kind of activities that you would like to kick off  to help build this community?

CT It would be great if we could have a Java User Group or for folks to do Meetups. It requires local participation and for folks to take it on.

 

JM If people want to reach you, what is the best way for them to connect with you?

CT @christhalinger or christian.thalinger@gmail.com

It is befitting that my last post for 2018 was, "It's a wrap", so it only behoves me to start off 2019 with not only Happy New Year but also, "Action!"

All being well, we together have the opportunity to do a lot of good actions. As we start this year there are some stakes that are already in the ground. In the first half of the calendar year we will be continuing our Oracle Code events, this time for 2019. It will some of the same cities as before eg New York, London, Berlin, Benglauru. In addition there will be new cities including Rome. Plus there will be joint events with Oracle Code as a part of Oracle OpenWorld regional  in Middle East (Dubai) as well as in Asia (Singapore). For more details check out OracleCodeEvents.

 

As a Community Manager, my colleagues and I will be scheduling live-streamed interviews with conference speakers, showing cool demos, and most of all just meeting you and answering questions and helping you get onto the Oracle Cloud.

 

In Fall 2019, of course we will have Oracle OpenWorld 2019 in San Francisco.  In between these events we will be creating all types of content for our Groundbreaker developer community. This will include blogposts, articles, podcasts, Youtube videos, Social media posts and more.

 

Above and beyond the planned activities are the unplanned ones and those make life interesting. With that I will leave you with a Rumi quote.

 

Rumi quote.jpg

As we round up the year, I want to thank all of you who participated in not only our DevLive/Groundbreaker speaker interviews at Oracle CodeOne and Oracle Code events. Along with the interview format, I had also created a new 60 Second Developer Interview format, where any attendee at an event can share a story for 60 seconds. Here are the top 60 Second videos for 2018. I factor in both the views and the story telling.

 

 

Best 60 Sec Video.JPG

Rebecca Arora sharing her 60 Second story at the Girl Geek Dinner Dec 2018

 

 

Enjoy.

 

    

RankNameViews
1060 Second Groundbreaker Story Rebecca Arora41
960 Second Groundbreaker Story Alais de Hoogh49
860 Sec Dev Story: Tips for New Engineers59
760 Second Groundbreaker Story Alla Shamis67
660 Second Groundbreaker Story Connor McDonald79
560 Sec Dev Story: Best Coding Practice Clean Code80
4Cyber Security Dev Week 2018104
3Keynote with Sri Ramanathan Dev Week 2018117
260 Sec Dev Story: Coding Best Practice JHipster139
1Machine Learning Dev Week 2018393

Well here we are December 2018, it's cliche to say "time flies", but reality it does, especially when you are busy doing work you love with an awesome team.

In the first calendar half of the year we were busy with Oracle Code events. Between my team we divvied up the 14 cities that we covered across four continents, North and South America, Asia and Europe.

The more I travel and feel blessed to meet developers and other folks at these kind of events, the more I feel it is the interactions with other humans that makes these events so powerful. It is like looking at cities throughout the world and you see and feel this energy that makes them run.

javed mohammed at oracle code paris.JPG

Some of the highlights for me in no particular order were:

  • Visiting Bogota, Columbia and feeling very proud of Oracle helping put a city on the map as a technology center. This was one of the largest Oracle Code events we had ever hosted with well over a thousand people attending.
  • Going to Sao Paulo, and Paris while the World Cup was going on and seeing the energy and enthusiasm of everyone around.
  • Being in Berlin at a venue which looked ancient as in world war two in a building which was used as a communication center by the Allies
  • Visiting Singapore and being amazed at how this small city-state could be so organized and play the role of a critical hub in South Asia

 

In October we had Oracle Open World 2018 and along with it our first Oracle CodeOne event. Again we had so many customers, partners and other folks attend the Groundbreakers Hub, it was truly wonderful. We had so many cool demos, and besides doing Groundbreaker videos, I got to host the Video Hangout. This is where any attendee could come and talk about a subject of their interest for 60 seconds on a green screen which we backed up with really cool backgrounds, and live-streamed it over Periscope/Twitter.

 

The rest of the time has been used to get articles, technology pages, newsletters, blogs, the occasional podcast, social media and of course videos out to the community. It has been a fulfilling year and I want to thank you all for your participation and help.

 

javed mohammed

Stories are a window into life. They can if they resonate provide insights into our own lives or the lives of others.They can help us transmit  knowledge, pass on traditions, solve present day problems or allow us to imagine alternate realities. Open Source software is an example of an alternate reality in software development, where proprietary has been replaced in large part  with sharing code that is free and open. How is this relevant to not only developers but people who work in technology? It is human nature that we continue to want to grow, learn and share. With this in mind, I started 60 Second Developer Stories and tried it out at various Oracle Code One events, at Developer Conferences and now at Oracle OpenWorld 2018/Code One. For the latter we had a Video Hangout in the Groundbreakers Hub at CodeOne where anyone with a story to share could do so. We livestream the story via Periscope/Twitter and record it and edit/post it later on YouTube.  In the Video Hangout, we use a green screen and through the miracles of technology Chroma key it in and put in a cool backdrop. Below are some photos of the Video Hangout as well as the ideas we give as suggestions.

Oracle 60 Second Developer Story 2IMG_3756.JPG

Oracle 60 Second Developer Story.jpg

60 Sec with Background.png

  •     Share what you learned on your first job
  •     Share a best coding practice.
  •     Explain how  a tool or technology works
  •     What have you learned recently about building an App?
  •     Share a work related accomplishment
  •     What's the best decision you ever made?
  •     What’s the worst mistake you made and the lesson learned?
  •     What is one thing you learned from a mentor or peer that has really helped you?
  •     Any story that you want to share and community can benefit from

 

 

 

 

Here are some FAQs about the 60 Second Developer Story

 

Q1. I am too shy, and as this is live what if I get it wrong?

A1. It is your story, there is no right or wrong. If you mess up, it’s not a problem we can do a retake.

 

Q2. There are so many stories, how do I pick one?

A2. Share something specific an event that has a beginning, middle an end. Ideally there was a challenge or obstacle and you overcame it. As long as it is meaningful to you it is worth sharing.

 

Q3. What if it’s not exactly 60 seconds, if it’s shorter or longer?

A3. 60 Seconds is a guideline. I will usually show you a cue-card to let you know when you have 30 secs. and 15 secs. left. A little bit over or under is not a big deal.

 

Q4. When can I see the results?

A4. Usually immediately. Whatever Periscope/Twitter handle we are sharing on, plus if you have a personal Twitter handle, we tweet that before you go live, so it will show up on your feed.

 

Q4. What if I am not a Developer?

A5. We use Developer in a broad sense. It doesn’t matter if you are a DBA or Analyst, or whatever. If you are involved with technology and have a story to share, we want to hear it.

 

 

Here is an example of a  a 60 Second Developer Story.

We hope to have the Video Hangout at future Oracle Code and other events and look forward for you to share your 60 Second story.

Unless you are a Gen Z, hopefully you have heard of or seen the Matrix movie trilogy. One of the most iconic scenes in the 1999 original, is where Neo played by Keanu Reeves  is doing his memorable slow motion dodge the bullet scene. It is an amazing special effect that at that time could only be done on a Hollywood budget. The good news is that technology has developed and lowered the cost to recreating that effect. In essence multiple 2D shots are taken in sequence around the subject and then rendered to make it look 3D. Of course Keanu had the benefit of having a green screen to composite in the actual background and bullets.

 

Oracle’s technology wizards have recreated that setup using 60 Raspberry Pi cameras, mounted on a rig. Here is a more detailed technical explanation of how Bullet Time works.

 

 

If you are attending Oracle Code One or OpenWorld 2018, come on over and you can experience it live by coming to Moscone West in the Developer Exchange and inside the GroundBreakers Hub.

Here are some outtakes from OOW 2017 and the best of Bullet Time. Look forward to seeing you there and don’t forget to practice your moves.

 

If you are a speaker and have attended an Oracle Code, Oracle Open World or other Oracle event chances are you may have been asked to do a video interview. We used to call it DevLive, it has now been rebranded as CodeLive. Either way, when we as Community Managers approach speakers, including those giving Keynotes, one of the common questions we get is "What do I need to prepare, or What will the questions be?

Hear are seven tips including how to prepare, what to wear, how to sit, where to look, how to answer a question etc.

DevLive Interview.jpg

 

 

The Rule of Seven

 

  1. Preparation: In pretty much any interview you will be the Subject Matter Expert (SME). It's unlikely that the person interviewing you will know more about the topic than you. From a preparation standpoint, it is important to learn how to talk in complete short thoughts. A typical interview for us runs seven to ten minutes. That means in order to get say five good questions and answers in, your replies should not be longer than 60-90 seconds. Keep it brief, and know when to stop.
  2. Distractions: Turn your phone off. Not silent, power it down, as even a buzz/vibration will be distracting.
  3. Clothes/Dress: Most of our interviews are at Tech conferences and the audience is mainly developers. You can dress informally, Business casual is good but most developers are in jeans and tshirts which is fine. Avoid wearing saturated colors and or clothes with stripes (eg Ties, shirts). Solid colors work better. White color can be dicey from an exposure standpoint.
  4. Where to Look: Most likely you will be wired up for your microphone, either with a headset, wireless lapel or other. Position your chair or if not your body so that you are facing your interviewer. Never look directly at the camera. You are having a conversation with the host so make eye contact with them.
  5. What to say: Answer the question but do it in such a way that a wider audience understands what you are talking about. Use conversational language, don't get lost in jargon.
  6. How to say it: When you can, smile, breathe, and talk at a normal pace. If you are a fast talker, slow it down. Make it interesting: Avoid answering questions with talking points verbatim. Know what makes you unique, and personalize the answer based on the situation. As long as you're not discussing something sad, have fun, sit up, and be someone who is fun to talk to and affable.
  7. How to make an impact: No matter what the subject, if at all possible share a story. People love stories, and although they may forget the details of what you shared, they may remember a poignant story you told. This is an extension of Maya Angelou's quote, "I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."

 

 

 

Below are two interviews my colleague Bob Rhubart did over Skype with Chris Richardson and Trisha Gee.

 

 

The count down to Oracle Code One 2018 continues, we're just less than ten days away. In my previous blogpost I gave an overview of the various things you can expect when you attend CodeOne as well as the Developer Exchange. In this post, I would like to cover something even more closer to my heart which is the "60 Second Developer Story." Let me explain it using the 5 W's.

What is it: It's an opportunity for any CodeOne attendee to share a story

Who: Anyone can do it, as long as it is of interest to someone in the tech community

Why: Everyone loves stories, they are memorable

Where: In Moscone West, in the Developer Exchange, and within that in the Groundbreakers Hub

When: Oct 22-24, 10am-4:30pm

 

 

60 Second Deveoper Story.JPG

 

So go ahead either just show up and share your 60 sec Developer Story and get a Free Pocket Tool Pen, or if you have any questions feel free to email me at javed.mo.mohammed@oracle.com. Below are some topics for you to consider. Start thinking in the shower or your drive or your favorite thinking spot, for interesting topics.

 

  1. How you solved a problem
  2. Something new you learnt
  3. Make a technology prediction
  4. Explain how something works
  5. How you built an App
  6. Share a best coding practice
  7. Share a best operational practice
  8. What did you learn on your first coding job?
  9. What's the best decision you ever made?
  10. The worst decision you ever made (and lesson learnt)?
  11. A cool way you helped your team do a great project
  12. Something you did for your community
  13. Best conference you attended and why
  14. How you used DevOps in your organization
  15. How you use Containers/Docker/Serverless
  16. How you use Chatbots, Big Data, BlockChain
  17. Anything else that would be interesting from a developer perspective

Depending on how you count it, there are approximately just ten days left to Oracle OpenWorld and CodeOne 2018. For those not in the know, CodeOne is a rebrand of the tried and trusted JavaOne conference and Oracle Code One. The latter being done almost across all continents and major metropolitan hubs. So what is taking place at CodeOne, gosh a lot. There are over 600 speakers, there is is of course Java specific content, but its far bigger than than with a Database track and all things Cloud.

 

Our team has also got a rebrand. We were for the last year the Oracle Developer Community, we are now the Oracle Groundbreakers.

O-Groundbreakers-Logo-BG-RGB 80px.png

As with any rebrand or just a new name, it takes a while to get used to it. Don't worry we're still going to be talking about cool and important technology trends including,  sessions on blockchain, chatbots, microservices, and AI.

When you walk into the exhibit hall in Moscone West, you will se the Developer Exchange. It's hard for me to describe it other than that there is a Groundbreakers Hub with so many activities and demos. it will blow your mind. Besides the Cloud Beer Demo, we will have the Bullet Time demo, which was so popular last year. Bullet Time that is as in the Matrix movie. It has 60 cameras on a rig and you can come in do some moves and it will capture and share the video to you via Twitter. Pepper the robot and his siblings will be there.

OracleCode.jpeg

As Community Managers, Yolande Poirier, Jim Grisanzio, Bob Rhubart and myself will be doing CodeLive interviews with speakers, that will be live-streamed on Periscope and later posted on YouTube. In addition Bob will be doing 2 Minute Tech Tips. If you want to do a 2 Minute Tech Tip, please contact Bob at bob.rhubart@oracle.com

I will be doing 60 Second Developer Stories, so if you want to share anything from a Developer perspective, eg Your first job, your best decision, your worst, an App  you created, just drop by.

 

Here are some of the speakers you can look forward to hearing.

 

 

 

There's a lot more to CodeOne and Groundbreakers Hub, look forward to meeting you there.

It's not often you get to meet a Java Rockstar, but I have been fortunate to meet Sebastian Daschner. For those of you on the Java scene you probably already know him. I saw him perform at the JavaOne Community Keynote in 2017 in San Francisco and then see him give the keynote at several Oracle Code events. He's an avid biker and a person of many talents as he performed on the Matrix theme either Neo or was it Morpheus?  Either way he did an amazing Bullet time demo.

Fast forward to the rebranded CodeOne event which takes place on Oct 22-25th and Sebastian is going all out there. He has four presentations:

 

  1. DEV5966        Bulletproof Java Enterprise Applications for the Hard Production Life
  2. DEV5967        Cloud Native, Service-Meshed Java Enterprise with Istio
  3. DEV5969        Seven Principles of Productive Software Developers
  4. DEV5960        Zero-Downtime Java Enterprise Applications with Kubernetes

If you plan to attend OpenWorld 2018/CodeOne 2018, check them out. Here is an interview I did with him to get a preview.

 

A behind the scenes look at Oracle Code

 

Four continents, 11 countries, and 15 cities,  and thousands of developers, that kind of sums up Oracle Code. As is usual for Code events we had Keynotes, Technical sessions, Hands-on-Labs, The IoT workshops, Zip Labs and the Oracle Code Lounge. The latter with places for people to hang out, experience cool Oracle Cloud demos, and watch DevLive studio where Community Managers interview Code speakers whose sessions are livestreamed on Periscope.

 

For those not in the know, one of the common questions we get asked is, "do you attend all the cities?" The simple answer is no, we divide and conquer! Usually there is at least one or more persons from the Operations side of the team and one or more Community Manager per city. Stephen Chin, who heads up Oracle Developer Community is sometimes the M.C. for the Keynotes, or it can be someone from the Product Management/Marketing teams (Gerald Venzl, Rex Wang) or one of the other Community Managers who speaks the local language (eg Pablo Ciccarello in South America or Yolande Poirier in France) can also end up playing host. Although a Code event is just a day for attendees,  as an organizer  it becomes a four to five day event. If it is an international destination, you leave one day, arrive the next, do setup on the third day, have the Code event on the fourth, and then head home and leave on the fifth. Any Code event is a huge logistical effort from the Developer Community teams Operational side (namely Linda Bronson and Martha Hess) along with the Events team (Margo Davis and other folks), plus people from the countries Oracle Marketing/Sales teams as well as a regional third party events team (eg in Europe MCI, with Ronan Coleman and Laura Harbison).

 

For the Developer lounge, besides Linda or Martha, the rest of the operations team (Lori Lorusso, Christina Brashear, Jennifer Nicholson, Melissa Thorne, Vincent Mayers) deal with setup, running the day-off Code and then teardown. Even with the best of planning, Murphy's law does come into play with demos, and to address it Vincent carries a full tool kit to get "under the hood." For DevLive speaker  interviews conducted by Community Managers, Asia was primarily covered by  Jim Grisanzio who is based in Japan, South America by Pablo based in Argentia, and the Americas by Bob Rhubart in the US heartlands, and the rest myself and Yolande.

Last but not least are the IoT workshop which requires a significant effort to setup, and is usually headed up by Noel Portugal on our team, or a regional expert, like Tim Graves out of Europe. Besides Oracle Product Managers, many of the speakers are eg Java Champions, ACE and ACE Directors as well as Developer Champions and they too play a key role in the success of the Code events. The net result is wherever we go we feel like one big Oracle Code family. It's great seeing familiar faces and the closer we work, the better we understand the needs and wants of each other.

 

Another common question is "what your favorite city or Code event?" I cannot speak for the whole team nor for all the cities. Every country and city is unique but there were some cities either due to the place and/or people that stood out for me personally. Our first Code event was in Los Angeles, and the whole team converged there, and that made it special. As with any first time event (at least for the year), there were new demonstrations to learn and with it new experiences. Next was Code Bogota. I have covered it in a previous blog post. What stood out for me was not only the huge attendance for a Code event (over a thousand people), but the energy and youth of the attendees. In addition to that, Bogota is not a typical destination for a technical conference so I feel very proud of Oracle for putting it on the map. This is the second year in a row that we did Code London, and the local team including Caroline Apsey and Becca Wan did an outstanding job bringing some fascinating speakers to interview. You can read more about it in the Code London blog post.   My other top pick is Code Singapore  with the venue at the Marina Bay Sands (which by the way has an amazing view of Singapore harbor) and the developers representing the diversity of this small island nation made it a standout.

 

There you have it, 200+ speakers from 31 countries, and a whopping 600,000+ live and online developers globally. Thank you for making it a success. Until next year, for Oracle Code 2018, "It's a wrap!"

In case you missed it, here is a video mashup of Oracle Code 2018 and some pics. Do you have have a favorite Code city event, would love to hear your thoughts?

 

 

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