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It's been a great few weeks for Systems ACEs! It feels like just yesterday we welcomed Marcel Hofstetter to the ranks, and here I am welcoming another!

 

johan_headshot.jpgCongratulations Johan Louwers for your selection as an Oracle ACE Director!

 

Johan, whom hails from the Netherlands, is a Oracle Linux, scripting, and open source guru working for Capgemini. He has worked as a developer, administrator, manager, project manager, managing consultant and senior architect within several IT companies and IT departments and specializes in Oracle technology, infrastructure technology, and IT strategy and has been advising and actively working with a large range of customers and companies.

 

He is one of Capgemini’s leading global resources on Oracle Engineered Systems and converged infrastructure in combination with Big-Data and high availability solutions for database and applications. Specialized in Oracle technology he has been selected by Capgemini to be one of the global Capgemini Experts in the Capgemini Expert connect program. Johan is currently the Global Lead Architect overseeing and managing the Capgemini Global Oracle Architect Office. In this role he primarily focuses on building a Capgemini view on Oracle technology and delivering solutions and advise to customers in this area.

 

He has a healthy interest in Linux, the open source community, and security and spends a great deal of his private time exploring those interests as well enjoying time with his family.

 

Welcome to the family!

 

To learn more and follow Johan, please visit:

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Over the past few months, Jsavit-Oracle has been writing a great multi-part series on Oracle VM Performance and Tuning. Obviously, Oracle VM performs well out of the box, but it doesn't hurt to apply these simple tactics from the experts to fine-tune it to operate like a Swiss watch, soaked in WD-40 that's mixed with Teflon, after being sprayed by that weird hydrophobic "stuff" that makes wine roll of your t-shirt when you decide to dance foolishly at parties spilling it everywhere.

 

Here are the first 6 parts:

 

Keep an eye on Jeff's Blog for more performance and tuning posts in the near future over at: https://blogs.oracle.com/jsavit/

 

 

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Tech Article:

How to Build a Cassandra Multinode Database Cluster on Oracle Solaris 11.3 with LUN Mirroring and IP Multipathing.

 

In this weeks "How-To Tuesday" post, I would like to highlight an article published today from a member of the Community, Antonios Tsavdaris. Antonis is an Oracle Solaris 11 Specialist in Greece and has worked as a DBA and IT Software Support Specialist; and we greatly look forward to seeing more articles from him in the future.

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Introduction:

This article describes how to build a Cassandra single-rack database cluster on Oracle Solaris 11.3 and extend its overall availability with LUN mirroring and IP network multipathing.

 

Cassandra database is a popular distributed database management system from Apache Foundation. It is highly scalable and comes with a master-less notion, in that there isn't a primary node to which other nodes are subservient. Every node in the cluster is equal and any node can service any request.

 

Oracle Solaris 11 is an enterprise-class operating system known for its reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS) features. Its wealth of integrated features helps administrators build redundancy into every part of the system they deem critical, including the network, storage, and so on.

 

This how-to article describes how to build a Cassandra single-rack database cluster on Oracle Solaris 11.3 and extend its overall availability with LUN mirroring and IP network multipathing (IPMP). LUN mirroring will provide extended availability at the storage level and IPMP will add redundancy to the network.

 

In this scenario, the one-rack cluster is composed of six Oracle Solaris server instances. Three of them—dbnode1, dbnode2, and dbnode3—will be the database nodes and the other three—stgnode1, stgnode2, and stgnode3—will provide highly available storage. The highly available storage will be constructed from nine LUNs, three in each storage node.

 

At the end of the construction, the one-rack cluster will have a fully operational database even if two of the storage nodes are not available. Furthermore, the networks—the public network and the iSCSI network—will be immune to hardware failures through IPMP groups consisting of an active and a standby network card..... [CLICK HERE TO READ MORE]

 

 

If you would like to contribute articles to the Oracle Technology Network like Antonis, please see: How To Get Published by Oracle Technology Network

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