It doesn't take long using My Oracle Support (MOS) to realize how much power lies within—knowledge articles, patches and updates, advisories and security alerts, for every version of every Oracle product line. But as broad and powerful as the resources in MOS are, sometimes you want to tailor the experience to your own organization.

Take a minute and follow our Top 5 Ways to personalize My Oracle Support to better suit your workflow.

1. Customizing the Screen Panels

One of the easiest personalization features is to adjust the panels displayed on a given page or tab. Nearly every activity tab allows you to reorganize, move, or even hide displayed panels on the screen using the Customize Page.... link in the top right area of the screen.

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When you click the link, the page will update and display a series of widgets on each panel, allowing you to customize the content.

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The wrench icon lets you customize the panel name, while the circular gear icon lets you move the panel within the column. The Add Content action displays a context-sensitive panel of new content areas that can be added to the column.

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2. Enable PowerView

The PowerView applet is one of the fastest ways to limit information displayed in MOS. PowerView filters information presented to you based on a products, support identifiers, or other custom filters you select. Once you've set up a PowerView filter set, any activities going forward—searches, patches and bugs, service requests (SRs)—will only appear if they are tied to your selected filters.

To build a PowerView, click the PowerView icon in the upper-left area of the screen.

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To create the view, first select the primary filter criteria. "Support Identifier", "Product", and "Product Line" are common primary filters.

Remember, the goal is to use PowerView to filter everything you see in MOS against the relevent contexts you establish.

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3. Set Up SR Profiles

This one's a bit trickier than the first two, but can be an enormous time-saver if you regularly enter service requests into MOS.

Go to the Settings tab in MOS, and look for Service Request Profiles link on your left. In some cases you may need to click the More... dropdown to find the Settings tab.

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In the profiles view you'll see any existing profiles and an action button to create a new profile. The goal for an SR profile is to streamline the process of creating an SR for a specific hardware or software product that you're responsible for managing. When creating an SR you'll select the pre-generated profile you created earlier, and MOS fills in the relevant details you input.

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4. Enable Hot Topics Email

Hot Topics Email is a second option available in the main MOS Settings tab.

Hot Topics is an automated notification system that will alert you any time specified SRs, Knowledge Documents, or security notices are published or updated.

There are dozens of options to choose from in setting up your alerts, based on product, Support Identifier (SI), content you've marked as as "Favorite", and more. See the video training "How to Use Hot Topics Email Notifications" (Document 793436.2) to get a better understanding of how to use this feature.

 

5. Enable Service Request Email Updates

Back in the main MOS Settings tab, click the link for My Account on the left. This will take you to a general profile view of your MOS account. What we're looking for is a table cell in the Support Identifiers table at the top that readsSR Details.

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By checking this box, you are indicating that you want to be automatically notified via email any time a service request tied to the support identifier gets updated.

The goal behind this is to stay abreast of any changes to SRs for the chosen support identifier. You don't have to keep "checking in" or wait for an Oracle Support engineer to reach out to you when progress is made on SRs. If a Support engineer requests additional information on a particular configuration, for example, that would be conveyed in the SR Email Update sent to you.

The trick is to be judicious using this setting. My Oracle Support could quickly inundate you with SR details notices if there are lots of active SRs tied to the support identifier(s), so this may not be desirable in some cases.

 

Conclusion

With these five options enabled, you've started tailoring your My Oracle Support experience to better streamline your workflow, and keep the most relevant, up-to-date information in front of you.

Give them a whirl, and let us know how it goes!