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10 Posts authored by: gaea.connary

If you've explored Custom Objects beyond just collecting incoming data, you've probably noted that there are only a few ways to enter a Custom Object into a Program to modify it. However, there’s no equivalent of Program Feeders for Custom Object records as there is for Contacts – using a Shared Filter that is periodically evaluated.

 

The best way to “feed” Custom Objects into a Program based on field values in those records is using Service Actions for “Add to Step in Program Builder”.

 

This how-to article describes how to use Custom Object Service Actions in conjunction with the Form Submit Cloud Connector to dynamically feed Custom Object records into Programs. It is not intended as a step-by-step guide for creating any of the assets described in this design.

 

CAUTION: This design will fail if you have more than one Custom Object record in this object per Contact record (i.e., email address), as the Custom Object record update will be inconsistent from the Form Submit. Further, ideally but not required, your Custom Object will have a Unique Code of “Email Address” used to map the record to the Contact. Assuming your data model meets these criteria, let’s get started:

 

1. Create a Form for the Cloud Connector.

 

You will need to include at least Email Address as a Form Field and a Processing Step of “Update Custom Data Object - With Form Data”, in which you’ll select the Custom Object containing the records to be entered into the Program and map at least Email Address. You can certainly chose to add additional Form Fields and Processing Steps to this Form, but this outlines what you’ll need at a minimum for this design to function.

 

In the screenshot below, I’m capturing another data point for “Last Action Type” in this Processing Step, coupled with setting a datestamp in “Last Action Date” in an additional Processing Step for “Update Custom Data Object - With Custom Data”. These pieces of information help with auditing by what and when the Custom Object record was updated and can also help prevent infinite loops described at the end of this article.

 

2014-07-29 05_53_35-Eloqua 10.png

 

2. Create a Program for Contact records, including a Step for Cloud Connector with type of “Form Submit (Contact)”. Just a quick references of what this Step looks like in Program Builder:

 

2014-07-29 06_01_52-Eloqua 10.png

 

To configure the Cloud Connector, select the Form that you created in the previous step, and then map the Contact fields and static values to the appropriate Form fields:

 

2014-07-29 06_05_45-Mozilla Firefox.png

 

3. Create a Shared Filter to use as a Feeder for this Program. This Shared Filter will contain the rules used to define which Custom Object record you wish to ultimately feed into the Program, but keep in mind that it will return Contact records.

 

If you want to modify Custom Object records based on values in fields on that Object, you’ll need to use the Filter Criteria “Has Linked Contact in Custom Object”:

 

2014-07-29 06_09_24-Eloqua 10.png

 

4. Create the Program into which the Custom Object records are to be fed. In this Program, you’ll include Steps with Update Rule Sets, and any other Actions applied to the Custom Object records.

 

IMPORTANT: In your Program design, be sure that you create an exit path for records that have already been appropriately modified, so as not to save the record again. If you do not, you will create an infinite loop with the Modified Data Action Service (see step 5. below), in which the record is updated, triggering the Modified Data Action Service, which again enters the record into the Program, where it again saved, and so on. Here's an option for how this exit path might be implemented using a Decision Rule:

 

2014-07-29 06_13_31-Eloqua 10.png

 

5. Create an Action Service for Modified Data on the Custom Object.

 

2014-07-29 06_19_32-Custom Object Services.png

 

Select the type “Add to Step in Program Builder”. In the Parameters,you’ll need to select “Custom Object Records” as the Entity Type, and the Program Name and Step into which the record should enter.

 

2014-07-29 06_21_30-Edit Processing Step.png

 

An alternative to preventing an infinite loop is conditionalizing this Processing Step to execute based on the presence of a value in a field on the Custom Object record. Using the example of the field "Last Action Type", you could set this field with a static value via the Form Submit Cloud Connector (e.g., "Ready to Update"), conditionalize this Step to only execute when that value is present, and run an Update Ruleset within the Custom Object Program to change the value in that field. As a result, when the record is modified, triggering the Action Service again, the record no longer meets the condition on the Step and the record is not added back into the Program.

 

NOTE: If your Form in step 1. above is creating records in the Custom Object rather than only updating existing ones, you will need to create Action Services for both Modified and New Data.

 

There are a number of scenarios in which you might need to update data values on a Custom Object, and once you’ve got the Custom Object record in a Program, your options for creative applications really expand!

Here are three key Eloqua Insight reports (Eloqua10) to help you answer questions such as:

  • Is my salesteam adopting Eloqua Engage? Who are they targeting?
  • Who on the team is sending the most emails? Templates versus their own? Who's getting the best engagement rates?
  • Which templates are the most used? Which get the best engagement rates?

 

In this article, you'll see screenshot examples of the information available in these reports. Click on the images below to see full-size versions.

 

NOTE: If your sales team is still using the Eloqua for Microsoft Outlook plug-in, these reports capture the same information for that tool. But you should definitely be considering an upgrade to Engage soon!

 

These sales email reports can be found in the folder "Sales Email Reports" under Email Metrics, which looks like the below:

Insight-Sales-Reports-01.png

 

Sales Email Opens and Website Visits

This report provides information about the recipients of your sales teams' emails: their contact information as well as if/when the email was opened and/or clicked and if the recipient unsubscribed or bounced. If an Engage template was sent, you'll see the name of that Email in the respective column.

Insight-Sales-Reports-02.png

 

Sales Email Template Usage

If your teams have built out a library of Engage templates, this report will show which are being used the most, and which are getting the best results -- this is great intel for managing your library.

Insight-Sales-Reports-03.png

 

Sales Email Overview

Who in your team is getting the most value from Engage? In this report, you'll see by Engage user who's sending the most emails and who's getting the best engagement. Highlight those users in your team meetings and gather their insight on what works best to share with other users.

Insight-Sales-Reports-04.png

 

These are the standard reports available to all Insight users. With the base Reporter license, you can remove columns or filter results; with the add-on Analyzer license, you can add further columns or even craft a custom report from the ground-up. We'd love to hear how you use the data from your Engage users to improve your marketing and sales efforts!

[The Eloqua9 version of this guide can be found at http://topliners.eloqua.com/docs/DOC-1668].

 

If you’ve maintained your marketing database for a length of time, it may be valuable to do some spring cleaning by deleting contacts you’re unable to reach or engage. If a large portion of your database is no longer of use, this may be skewing your reports and analysis of the overall health of your database.

 

What kinds of contacts might be candidates for deletion?

  • Contacts whose email addresses have hard bounced. A hard bounce means that the address was rejected by the receiving email server because either the account or the domain did not exist, or there was a network problem on the recipient's end.
    • Before deleting, you may want to investigate if the bounce was caused by a malformed email address (e.g., jsmith@homtail.com) that could easily be corrected.
  • Prospective customer contacts that have unsubscribed from receiving any email from you, and you have exhausted alternative channels with which to reach them, e.g., by phone, or they are not valuable enough to attempt to re-subscribe.
  • Contacts that are no longer at the company.
  • Contact records that have been deleted from your CRM system.
  • Contacts that have been disqualified as prospective customers. However, if these contacts are currently engaging with your broader communications, such as newsletters, you may want to keep them in your database – they may be interested enough to become customers at their next job.
  • Contacts that have not engaged with either your outbound or inbound channels in a long period of time, especially if it exceeds your average length of sales cycle.
    • For these types of contacts, it is strongly recommended that you attempt to re-engage them one last time before deleting their records: Create an Automated Reengagement Campaign in Eloqua10. If they are a valuable prospect, you should attempt to re-engage the Contact through channels other than email before considering deletion.

 

As you go through the exercise of identifying which contacts to delete, consider whether the cost of keeping them has exceeded to cost of acquiring them. For example, if your company spends an average of $250 to generate an inquiry, but only $25 a year to keep them, you could afford to keep them in your database for up to 10 years for the same cost.

 


 

Please take a moment to read through this entire document before proceeding, so you’re aware of the full ramifications of deleting your Contact records in Eloqua.

 

How do I delete Contact records?

 

1.   Add the Contacts to a Segment

Once you’ve identified the criteria for the Contacts you wish to delete, you will need to add them to a Segment. You can add Contacts to a Segment using Filter Criteria (using Contact field data as well as activity and/or inactivity), searching for Individual Contacts, through a list upload, or Shared Filters or Lists.

 

For instructions on how to create and manage Segments, see Article Number 1152 in Customer Central titled “Eloqua 10 Segments”. Note that you can enter this number directly into the search.

 

2.   View the Contacts

From your Segment, click the “View Contacts…” button:

E10-DeletingContacts-01.png

3.   Export the Contacts

In the “View Segment Members” window, click the “Export” button in the lower left corner. In the pop-up, make sure your email address appears and that you select “All contact fields” for export. Click the “Export” button to send an email with your list of Contacts.

E10-DeletingContacts-02.png

Eloqua will send you an email with your Contact list, which you’ll need to perform the Contact deletion.

 

As a best practice, you should also:

 

  • Save this list within your organization’s systems as a backup, should you need to access the Contact data at some point in the future.
  • Export all Custom Objects (see Article 1012 in Customer Central titled “Data Cards”, section “Viewing and Managing Data Card Set Reports”) for these Contacts, as this information will not be re-created by Eloqua, should the Contact record be re-created.
  • If you track communication preferences (e.g., Do Not Call, Plain Text Email Only) solely in Eloqua, upload this information into your CRM. Consider doing this for both the Contacts you are deleting at present, and as part of the update process for Contacts going forward.

 

4.   Delete the Contacts from Eloqua

 

Please note that deleting Contacts is an irreversible action. If you accidentally delete any Contacts, we may not be able to recover all your data, and you may incur additional fees to do so.

 

For the actual deletion, navigate to the Contacts section and click the “Upload…” button:

E10-DeletingContacts-03.png

In the Contact Upload Wizard, under “Import Purpose”, select “Delete Contacts”:

E10-DeletingContacts-04.png

Continue through the Contact Upload Wizard steps – see Article 1148 in Customer Central titled “Eloqua 10 Contacts” for more detail.

 

IMPORTANT: If you have CRM Autosynchs, you will need to prevent these Contacts from returning to your Eloqua database via the synchs. You have two options:

 

  1. Create a field on the CRM record to mark them (for example, a checkbox “Do not sync”), and add a Filter to your Autosynchs to bypass those records that have the field checked (see Article 1003 in Customer Central titled “CRM Integration”, section “Retrieve Data”). You can find detailed explanation on accomplishing this here: Effectively Removing Records from Eloqua. Or,

  2. Delete the same Contacts in your CRM system. Note that this document does not discuss any considerations or ramifications around deleting records from your specific CRM system.

 

What affect will this have on historical reporting?

It is strongly recommended that you export any reports (Article 1278 titled “Eloqua Insight Analyzer User Guide”, section “Exporting Reports”) that include Contact fields, Profile data or Custom Objects associated with these Contacts. Once the Contacts are deleted, the following types of reports will be affected:

 

  • Reports using Contact attributes – any report rows for a deleted Contact will display “Deleted Contact”
  • Reports on Program Builder Program membership, entry, exit or paths
  • Reports using Custom Object linkages to Contact records

 

What happens if a deleted Contact comes back into my database?

If a deleted Contact is re-created, for example, if a deleted Contact comes back into your database from a Form submission, the following data is maintained and will return:

 

  • Subscription Status (Subscribed/Unsubscribed)
  • Email Status (Bounceback/Valid)
  • Bounceback history
  • Profile data (only if the Contact’s Eloqua cookie is still active), including:
    • Email sends, opens, and click-throughs
    • Form submissions
    • Web visits
    • Referrers
    • Content Tags
    • Query Strings

 

If a Contact had a Status of Unsubscribed or Bounceback at the time of deletion, the re-created Contact record will have the same status, which will need to be reset before you can send any email.

 

The following data will not return:

 

  • Shared List memberships
  • Subscription Group memberships
  • Program Membership history (entries, exits, paths through programs)
  • PURL Names (a new PURL Name will instead be created)
  • Custom Object linkages to Contact record (note: the Custom Objects remain in Eloqua, but will no longer be linked to the Contact)
  • Datestamp values, such as “Date Created” (these are re-set to the new date)
  • Expired Profile data (if the Contact has no activity on their Eloqua cookie for more than 4 months)
  • External Call history

 

If the Contact record is re-created from the CRM via an Autosynch, those Contact fields populated by the Autosyncs will be re-populated. Any fields populated only by Eloqua (e.g. from Form Processing Update Rules) will not be re-populated. Any Custom Objects created by Autosynchs will also be re-created, but with the same caveat that data in Eloqua-populated fields will not be re-populated.

 

If you have any questions about the information in this document, please contact our Support team at 866.327.8764 or online via Customer Central.

When you first open the Campaign or Email Dashboard in Insight, the metrics for your aggregate activities is displayed. These are very useful benchmarks, but what if you want to drill down in the reporting? You can! You might have noticed the drop-down menus at the bottom of the dashboard here:

 

InsightCampaignFields-01A.png

In this article, we’ll show you how to configure and use these selectors to segment your dashboards.

 

First, meet with your campaign stakeholders to determine the categories you want to use for your drill-down reports. Defaults are available in Eloqua for Region, Product, and Campaign Type, but you may want to use your own options.

 

With this list, navigate to Setup>Campaign Fields (requires Customer Administrator permissions). You’ll see the three default fields:

InsightCampaignFields-02.png

You’ll need to connect the default Select Lists for each (they have the same name as the Fields), or create your custom Select Lists. When done, your configuration might look like this, for example:

InsightCampaignFields-03.png

You’ll need to wait about 15 minutes or so before the next step. Navigate to your Campaign, and go to the Settings menu like so:

InsightCampaignFields-04.png

Toward the bottom of the Settings dialog, you’ll see those same Campaign Field options – pick the one that’s most applicable, like so:

InsightCampaignFields-05.png

You’ll need to wait a little while again for the updates to populate in your dashboards. Once completed, in your dashboards, you can check the appropriate Campaign Fields and quickly segment your reports like this:

InsightCampaignFields-06A.png

Once selected, all of the reports in that dashboard will only show results for those Campaigns flagged with that Field. Very cool!

A/B testing is a key best practice to help you improve your email engagement rates. You execute an A/B test by comparing a test email, changing only one variable such as subject line, against your baseline email to determine which version drives the best results. Our recommendation is to carve off 10% from your initial Segment to use for the A/B test, and then splitting that portion in half, one half to receive the baseline, and the other the test. After determining the "winner", you send that email to the remaining 90% of the initial list.

 

For Eloqua10 users, there is capability to run an A/B test in Program Builder, but since you're sending emails, we recommend you use the Campaign Canvas. This article provides step-by-step instructions to create and use a Campaign Template for your A/B testing.

 

 

Create your A/B Testing Campaign Template

First, you'll need to create two Shared Filters. These will be used to execute the split of your lists: first, to carve off 10% against which to run the test, and then an even split for the two test emails.

 

The Criteria in your Filters use the unique Eloqua Contact ID value to determine into which split the Contact will be placed. All Contacts created in Eloqua are given a Contact ID immediately on creation, and the values end in a series of numbers. We're going to use these in an inventive way to create the split -- thank you to Eloqua Product Specialists Ryan Wheler and Anirude Gurcharn for developing this method!

 

1. Create a Shared Filter for the 90:10 Split

The single Criteria in this Filter is configured like so:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-01A.png

The comparator value is looking for any record with a Contact ID in which the second-to-last number is a 1. The * and the ? characters (an asterisk and a question mark, respectively) are referred to as "wildcards" in this type of application. The asterisk represents any number of any characters and the question mark represents any one character, and your value entered is "*1?" (without the quotes). To illustrate, if the Contact ID is ABC00000000093217, it will match this Criteria, and thus be included in this Filter. NOTE: This is an update from past versions of this article and uses newly-available Filter comparators in Segments.

 

2. Create a Shared Filter for the 50:50 Split

This Filter has multiple Criteria, and they're joined by ORs -- we want Contact records with an ID that matches any one of these Criteria:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-02A.png

In this case, we're using the last digit of the ID (hence the newly-available comparator of "ends with"), and since we want half of the records, we have Criteria for the odd numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9.

 

If you're not sure what this means, don't worry. You'll only need to create these Shared Filters once as you see above, as you can reuse them as-is for all your future testing.

 

3. Create your Campaign.

First, drag the Audience, Assets, and Decisions onto the Canvas and connect them exactly as you see below. We'll go through configuring each following the numbers on the red arrows.

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-03.png

1. Wait

We need to include this "Wait" Action because the Campaign Canvas doesn't allow a Decision as the first action from the Segment. We can configure it for a small amount of time though, like so:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-04.png

NOTE: If you are entering fractions of an hour in a Wait Action, make sure the value results in a whole number of minutes. For example, 0.25 Hours equals 15 minutes.

 

2. Shared Filter Member? -- carve off 10% of your Segment

Select the "90:10 Split" Shared Filter that you created in the step above for this Decision. Approximately ten percent of the Contacts in your initial Segment will meet the Criteria in this Shared Filter, and therefore pass down the "Yes" branch from the Decision.

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-05.png

3. Wait -- for the 90% that will receive the winning email

From the "No" branch of the "Shared Filter Member?" Decision, set the Wait for 3 days, or however much time, plus a window, you want to let your test run. You should have a good idea of the winning email in 24 hours after executing your test, and know with certainty by 48 hours after -- at this point, the vast majority of recipients will have responded, if they respond at all.

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-06.png

4. Shared Filter Member? -- split the test group into half

Now let's configure the execution of the split, again using a "Shared List Member?" Decision, but this time with your 50:50 Split, like so:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-07.png

Approximately half of the Contacts entering this Decision will meet the Criteria in this Shared Filter and move down the "Yes" path, while the remainder go down the "No" path.

 

5. Save As Template

At this point, you've configured all of the elements you need to turn this Campaign into a Template that you can re-use for your future A/B tests! Your Campaign should look this:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-08.png

To save your new template, simple select "Save as Template…" from the Settings menu:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-09.png

Configure the Template for your A/B Test

Before we go to the Campaign Canvas, you'll need to create the following items for your A/B test:

  • Your initial Segment, the full audience to which you plan to send the message
  • Your baseline Email
  • Your Test Email

 

1. In the Campaign Canvas, create a new Campaign using your Template, like so:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-10.png

2. Configure your initial Segment:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-11.png

3. Add your Emails:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-12.png

4. Change the dates to those appropriate for your Campaign:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-13.png

5. Activate your Campaign.

 

6. Wait for the results of your Test. Be sure you do not wait longer than the number of days you configured in the Wait Action for the recipients of the winning Email! Your Campaign members will automatically exit the Campaign otherwise.

 

7. In Insight, run the report "Campaign Analysis" for your Campaign. You can either select it in the prompt, or create a Filter on the results, or find it by eyeballing the list of Campaigns. Click the value for your Campaign in the column headed "Total Sends" -- this will drill-down to the report with the results for each Email in your Campaign.

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-14.png

The metrics you'll use to determine the winning Email will depend on what variable you tested. For example, if your test was on subject line, you'll likely pick the Email with the higher Open Rate as the winner.

 

8. De-Activate your Campaign.

 

9. Add the Asset to send the winning Email:

ABTestingCampaignCanvasE10-15.png

10. Check that your Campaign Reporting dates are correct, and re-Activate your Campaign. The Contacts sitting in the Wait Action will be sent the winning Email.

 

Best Practices for Testing

Identify one variable you'd like to improve and develop a plan of attack. Here are some tips for testing:

  • Frame the problem in the form of a question. Propose a hypothesis: an educated guess as to the cause of the results. Then, determine what you'll test to prove or disprove that hypothesis.
  • Try to avoid testing too many elements at once, so as not to cloud your results.
  • Be sure you can measure what you are testing.
  • A technical note: if you wish to test one audience against another (everyone still receives the same email), you will need to have separate instances of your Email for each. At this time, Eloqua Insight is only able to report on Email engagement, not on a Segment.

 

Here are some suggested targets for your testing:

  • Subject lines
  • Highly graphical versus mainly text emails
  • Email or landing page layout, including offer placement and form length
  • Adding humor
  • Additional or less copy
  • Including segment-specific content

 

Looking for some great examples of A/B testing on both emails and landing pages? Check out Anne Holland's site "Which Test Won?" -- see if you answer correctly!

Just getting started with using Eloqua for your event invitations, registration, reminders, and follow-ups? Automation will help you gain many hours back in your day, and there are some great templates for the Eloqua9 and Eloqua10 to help you kick off the process!

 

Eloqua10

Campaign Template: BP Basic Event Template

Configuration Guide: In the Knowledgebase, search for article #1267, titled "Eloqua 10 BP Basic Event Template Configuration"

 

Eloqua9

Program Template: BP - Event Registration (Single Session) (alternate names include "00 - Template - Event Registration" or "SYSTEM - Template - Event Registration"

Configuration Guide: In the Knowledgebase, search for article #1268, titled "E9_Managing Events using Program Builder"

 

Need additional guidance? If you have an Eloqua Education Pass, attend these Eloqua University courses:

  • Eloqua10: E10 - Multi-Touch Email Programs
  • Eloqua9: E9 - Increase Online Event Attendance

 

Good luck with your events!

Generally, I avoid using the same words to define a term as are actually in the term, but simply put, "Profile Completeness" is an assessment of how complete your contact data is against your defined complete contact profile.  I briefly described Profile Completeness in my article 6 Key Metrics for Monitoring Your Database – here you'll find some additional depth and reporting on this metric.

 

Profile completeness helps you understand the quality of your data (not just quantity, like some of those other metrics). It can help you answer questions such as:

  • How accurately will I be able to segment my lists against my buyer persona?
  • How effective will I be at automatically assigning leads to the right salesperson?
  • How valuable will my lead scoring criteria be?

 

Knowing the quality of your data ahead of your campaign deployment will make that process that much smoother. It allows you to very quickly see where you have data gaps. Let's jump into how we get to this metric.

 

1. Define a set of Contact fields for your complete profile.

To help you go through this exercise, refer to your Buyer Personas. If you haven't yet developed these, there's a great Power Hour on Creating Buyer Personas, and if you have an Eloqua All-Access Education Pass, register for the course "Contact Management Essentials" in Eloqua University.

 

Now, given the key attributes in your Persona(s), what are the Contact fields in your database that contain this information? What are the fields you use most frequently to segment your lists? What fields do you often use for personalization? Keep this list of fields manageable, say in the 6-10 fields range, to start.

 

We'll use the following list of fields for our example of a "complete profile":

  • Email Address
  • First Name
  • Company
  • Country
  • Industry
  • Job Role

 

2. Measure the profile completeness.

This metric analyzes the percentage of Contacts in your database have a value for each of the fields in your complete profile. Here's what the underlying math looks like:

 

Contact Field

Contacts with Field Value

Field Completion Rate

Email Address

7963

100%

First Name

3606

45%

Company

4064

51%

Country

6724

84%

Industry

6563

82%

Job Role

218

3%

TOTAL Contacts

7963


Average Profile Completeness


61%

 

Consider using a bar chart for a helpful visualization:

ProfileCompleteness-1.png

Right away, you can see there's a potential issue here – "Job Role" is only at 3% completion. This may make it difficult for me to segment for my next campaign. Further, "First Name" completion is quite low at 45%, which means my "Dear {First_Name}" salutation may not be as personalized as I'd hoped.

 

Now I know exactly where my data gaps lie, I can easily apply the right tactics to build completeness for these fields, such as progressive profiling, data appending services (consider Cloud Connectors), and calling campaigns.

 

"Average Profile Completeness" is a helpful at-a-glance view of your Profile Completeness, but you'll want to benchmark at the individual field level as well. Since it's an average, it can mask trouble spots like those described above.

 

So how do you obtain this data from Eloqua? The reporting methods are a bit different for Eloqua10 versus Eloqua9.

 

Monitoring Profile Completeness in Eloqua10

 

Create a new Segment, and using your list of Contact fields, add a Filter criteria for each to identify the presence of any value in each of those fields, like so:

 

E10-MonitorScoring-01.png

Select the Filter Criteria from the right menu “Compare Contact  Fields”. For Contact fields with free form, your rule will look like this:

 

E10-MonitorScoring-06.png

An asterisk (*) is called a "wildcard" in this context, and it tells Eloqua to look for any type or number of characters in the field.

 

This might also be an opportunity to measure quality as well as completeness – for example, checking that Email Address follows the format *@*.* (without quotes).

 

For Contact fields using a Select List, your rule will look like this:

 

E10-MonitorScoring-07.png

For Contact fields with a Data Type of "Numeric", your rule might look like this:

 

E10-MonitorScoring-08.png

Once you've added all of your rules for the Contact fields, also include a rule to bring in all Contacts (you may already have a Shared Filter you can use) – you'll need this value if you want to calculate the percentage completeness.

 

Label each of the Filter criteria with the appropriate Contact field name. Here's what your final Segment might look like:

 

ProfileCompleteness-2.png

From here, you'll have to move the numbers above into another tool, such as Excel, to calculate the completeness. See the table and chart above for an example – they use the same values as you see in the Segment above.

 

Monitoring Profile Completeness in Eloqua9

 

Create a Contact View that contains those fields in your complete profile by navigating to Evaluate>Database Management(menu)>Database Setup(tab) and under the menu "Contacts", select "New Contact View", like so:

 

ProfileCompleteness-3.png

Find the report "Contact Field Completeness" by going to Evaluate>Reporting(menu)>Report Console(tab) and searching. Configure the report by selecting your Contact View.

 

Your resulting report might look something like this:

 

ProfileCompleteness-4.png

Hover over the bars to see the exact percentage of completion for each field. You will again have to take the data into another tool to calculate Average Profile Completeness. (Aside: this report is from a different database, so the numbers don't match the Eloqua10 example above).

 

Capture your numbers centrally – this will be very important information as you roll out efforts to improve completeness to see how successful these programs are. Maintain these benchmarks on a periodic basis.

 

For a more in-depth discussion on Profile Completeness in the context of lead scoring, take a look at the post E10: Monitoring Your Lead Scoring Program Results.

 

For a complete list of best practice benchmarks you should be monitoring, check out the Eloqua Success Plan (Topliners Insiders Group membership required).

A common reporting question from marketers is how to track visitors that come to their landing pages from a variety of sources such as email, websites, direct mail, social media, banner ads, etc. The key to achieving this is through creating explicit unique links to that landing page. In other words, if you use the same link for each source, there's often no way to distinguish from where visitors came. We need a way to make the URL unique, and this can be achieved through Query Strings.

 

Query Strings are an addition to your landing page URL, and they are quite easy to construct. Even better, you can capture out values from the Query String in your URL into your Forms, allowing you to write those values to the Contact record, and ultimately synch them to your CRM system. You've likely seen them before but may not have realized their value.

 

Here's a quick example to illustrate: today I visited aol.com and clicked on a banner ad for Zulily's Festive Frocks deal. This takes me to their landing page, and note the URL used:

 

https://www.zulily.com/auth/create/?tid=aoldisp_hmpg_festivefrocks

 

The part that is highlighted in green is the Query String. There are two elements to it: 1) the parameter (effectively the name of the Query String) which is "tid", and 2) the value (the unique value assigned). Zulily appears to have incorporated a lot of information into this value: "aol" is the referring website, "hmpg" might describe the banner size or placement, and "festivefrocks" is the content of the ad on which I clicked.

 

To further illustrate, I find another Zulily ad on aol.com, this time for Crocs. The URL of the landing page that this takes me to is:

 

https://www.zulily.com/auth/create/?tid=aoldisp_hmpg_300x250_1110_crocs_2

 

Note the parameter is the same, "tid", but the value is different: "aol" is captured again, but the information about the banner ad and the offer is changed. Zulily can use this information to see how I came to their landing pages in terms of the referring website, the banner ad, and the offer.

 

This is all extremely actionable information, and as a visitor, I haven't actually done anything yet – I'm still an unknown visitor. Zulily wants to me to be a known visitor by driving me to complete a form. My conversion tells Zulily that this was a good referring source and an appealing offer, and they can also pass this data into their system used to track me to eventually becoming a customer (i.e., CRM system). Thus the marketing operations team can close the loop on reporting right back to that original referring source. Yay for festive frocks!

 

So how do you execute this tracking in Eloqua?

 

1. Create your Query String:

1.    In Eloqua10, go to Setup>Query Strings

2.    In Eloqua9, go to Automate>Web Profiling>Query Strings

 

From here, the interface is the same: select from the "Query Strings" menu, "New Query String Parameter". Provide a Display Name (consider employing a standard naming convention if you will be using this method frequently) and Parameter (this needs to be unique to the Query String).

ReferringSourceQueryString-1.png

Although you have other options here, it's unlikely that you'll need to configure anything else on this page. Click the Save button when done.

 

In E9, you also have the option of also creating a Display Map, which allows you to map your values to more descriptive terms for readability in your reports. For E10 users, this capability is on the roadmap.

 

2. Create your Parameter values. Make a list of all of the elements you want to capture in your reporting, such as referring website, banner ad creative, offer type, etc. You can also use a Query String to capture a Campaign ID to use for reporting in your CRM system. Make a list of unique values for each that are short and have no spaces or special characters -- these are your Parameter values (note that these values should be captured locally; optionally, you can capture them in a Display Map).

 

3. Create your landing page URLs with the Query String detail. First, you'll need to get the base URL to your landing page. Let's assume your page is hosted in E10; the URL might look like http://asdftesting.eloqua.com/LP=1234. This part will be the same for all your referring sources (note the Zulily example above). Adding the Query String will make a unique link for each source.

 

Construct your URLs using the following format (no brackets):

 

{base url}?{Parameter name}={Value}

 

For example, say I have four referring sources, and my Query String Parameter name is "source". Using the base URL above, my landing pages URLs will look like this:

 

http://asdftesting.eloqua.com/LP=1234?source=email

http://asdftesting.eloqua.com/LP=1234?source=twitter

http://asdftesting.eloqua.com/LP=1234?source=qrcode

http://asdftesting.eloqua.com/LP=1234?source=bannerad

 

These are the links you'll use from each of your referring sources. For example, if you're hosting a banner ad on a third-party site, this is the link you'll need to provide to the ad manager for that site with your ad creative.

 

4. Create your landing page Form, including a hidden field for capturing the Query String. Make note of the HTML Name of that field, like so in E10:

ReferringSourceQueryString-2.png

And in E9:

ReferringSourceQueryString-3.png

You also need to make note of the HTML Name of the Form itself. In E10:

ReferringSourceQueryString-4.png

And in E9:

ReferringSourceQueryString-6.png

5. Add Javascript to your landing page to capture the Query String value from your URL into the hidden field in your Form. This Javascript is linked from the Eloqua Artisan blog post here: http://eloqua.blogspot.com/2009/04/lead-source-codes-capturing-with.html. Follow the instructions in the article to update the code with your HTML Form Name, hidden field HTML Name, and Query String Parameter.

 

In Eloqua10, you'll be placing the final Javascript into the Page Snippet Tools under "JS", like so:

ReferringSourceQueryString-7.png

In Eloqua9, the best place is in a Page Header Script, found here:

ReferringSourceQueryString-8.png

If your landing page is hosted outside of Eloqua, you may need to speak with your webmaster to add the Javascript.

 

6. Capture the Query String value to the submitter's Contact record. If you want to pass the value to your CRM system, you'll need to capture it to a field on the submitter's Contact record. You will need to complete the following steps:

1. Find or create an Eloqua Contact field for the data and a CRM Lead/Contact field.

2. Update your External Calls to map the Eloqua Contact field to the CRM Lead Contact field.

3. Add or update a Form Processing Step to write the value from the Form Submission to the Eloqua Contact field.

 

You may also want to add a Processing Step to your Form to add the Contacts to a Shared List, which may make it easier for segmentation and reporting for this audience going forward.

 

7. Test. Find a few friends or colleagues to help and give each a unique URL to your landing page. Ask them to click through and submit the Form, and then check that all of the data is captured appropriately.

 

A few caveats about this method:

  • It relies on Javascript; some visitors may have this disabled in their browser, and you will therefore not capture any source value for them.
  • The Query String Parameter value can only be captured if the Form is on that landing page for the URL. In other words, if the visitor clicks through on your URL containing the Query String, navigates around your site, and then comes to the landing page, the value is no longer in the URL and thus won't be captured.

 

Now that everything is in place to capture your referring source data, you'll of course want to report on it. If you chose to do your reporting in Eloqua, here's where you'll go:

 

MetricEloqua10 report
Eloqua9 report
Number of visitors to landing page by Query String value (referring source)Query String Parameter ValueQuery String Values
Number of landing page form submissions by Query String valueForm Submission Data (in the Settings menu for the Form itself)Form Field Values or Form Submission Data
Landing page conversion rate by Query String value# Form Submissions / # Visitors (you’ll have to do the math)As with Eloqua10

 

If you've captured the referring source to the Contact record, you now have the ability to do a lot of other interesting reporting, for example, looking a Job Titles by referring source, or even using that information in your Lead Scoring criteria. By passing the source to your CRM, you can also look at qualified leads, sales opportunities, and closed deals generated by referring source.

 

Query Strings are a powerful tool for capturing a variety of data out of URLs, including Google AdWords keywords, and you can also use the values to conditionalize a next step from your campaign landing page, such as Dynamic Content in a follow-up email. They can also be a great way to re-use one form for multiple campaigns – unique landing pages could popup the form or have it embedded in an iFrame so the visitor experience is seamless. Keep them in mind as you scale your campaigns!

You’ve spent time developing a lead scoring model – but are you monitoring your results? In today’s business, things can change quickly: your target buyer personas, your market, your marketing campaigns, your website content, your CRM data, your sales model, etc. Is your scoring model still aligned?

 

In this article, I’ll describe how to get quick insight into the results of your lead scoring program using Segments in Eloqua10. For the purpose of this exercise, I’ll assume you’re using Eloqua’s best practice Co-Dynamic Lead Scoring model (for an overview of this model, read the Eloqua Grande Guide to Lead Scoring). This outputs scores such as A1, A2, B3, D4, etc., but you can easily apply this method to your own scoring model.

 

This article is lengthy, so here are some quick links to the different topics we’ll be covering:

 

 

Overall Lead Score Results

First, you’ll need to identify which Contact field is capturing the score. For those using the best practice model, this is named “Lead Rating - Combined”. Next, go to Contacts>Segments in the main menu, and create a New Segment.

 

For each value in the scoring model, create a unique Filter Criteria to identify that value, like so:

E10-MonitorScoring-01.png

Select the Filter Criteria from the right menu “Compare Contact Fields”, select the Contact field that contains the score, and enter the value, like so:

E10-MonitorScoring-02.png

Repeat this process for each of the values in your scoring model. Also add a Filter to find Contacts that have no value (blank) in this field. Give each Filter Criteria a descriptive label.

 

Depending on how many scoring values you have, this can be time consuming, but you only have to do it once. Don’t forget to save your Segment!

 

Here’s what your final Segment should look like:

E10-MonitorScoring-03.png

Right away, in this example, we can see the scoring results are out of whack: 5,020 Contacts out of the total 5,149 have a score of “D4”.

 

When you have a good spread across the values, it can difficult at a glance to see inconsistencies like this. In this case, I suggest creating a quick chart from the values in Excel or similar, like so:

E10-MonitorScoring-035.png

 

Implicit and Explicit Breakdown

You can use this same Segment method to further break down the Co-Dynamic scores for monitoring. Again, you’ll need to identify the Contact field containing the values for each (for those using the best practice model, these are “Lead Rating – Profile (Explicit)” and “Lead Rating – Engagement (Implicit)”). The resulting Segments from our example look like this:

 

Profile (Explicit) Breakdown

E10-MonitorScoring-04.png

Engagement (Implicit) Breakdown

E10-MonitorScoring-05.png

 

Note that in the Explicit Segment, I used Shared Filters – you may find that some of these Criteria are already set up as Shared Filters in your Eloqua install – take a look at what you have before proceeding.

 

This breakdown gives a little more insight into what’s happening at the micro level in your scores between the Profile and the Engagement.

 

 

Evaluating Profile Completeness and Engagement

When lead scoring results are so strongly skewed to the lower ratings as in our example, the recommended next step is to investigate the completeness of the criteria used. In other words, how many Contacts are in your database that can actually meet your scoring criteria?

 

“Profile Completeness” is defined as the percentage of Contacts that have a value for the fields in your definition of a complete profile, in this case, those Contact fields you’re using in your lead scoring criteria. As with the previous exercises, we’re going to use Segments to assess this metric.

 

Create a new Segment and add a Filter criteria to identify the presence of any value for each of the Contact fields used in your scoring criteria.

 

For Contact fields with free form, your rule will look like this (click any of the follow images to enlarge):

E10-MonitorScoring-06.png

An asterisk (*) is called a “wildcard” in this context, and it tells Eloqua to look for any characters in the field.

 

For Contact fields using a Select List, your rule will look like this:

E10-MonitorScoring-07.png

For Contact fields with a Data Type of “Numeric”, your rule might look like this:

E10-MonitorScoring-08.png

Once you’ve added all of your rules for the Contact fields, also include a rule to bring in all Contacts (you may already have a Shared Filter you can use) – you’ll need this value if you want to calculate the percentage completeness.

 

Here’s what our resulting Segment shows:

E10-MonitorScoring-09.png

We can see at a glance in this case that the completeness for each field is quite low; to demonstrate further, you may want to calculate the percentages like so:

 

Contact Field
Contacts with
Field Value

Field Completion
Rate

Department1703.3%
Job Role1322.5%
Type of Retailer1252.4%
Number of Stores160.3%
Annual Revenue160.3%
TOTAL Contacts5,194
Average Profile Completeness
1.8%

 

Conclusion: the scoring criteria may be accurate, but it’s difficult to assess the quality of the results due to highly incomplete profiles. Your next steps will be to develop programs to improve the completeness of your profiles, for example, assets requiring a form submission with those fields, list purchases, or manual data append projects.

 

For Engagement completeness, you can quickly create a Segment to assess your engagement scoring criteria by re-using the Shared Filters already in use by your lead scoring Program. Going back to our example, here are the Segment results:

E10-MonitorScoring-10.png

Again, it’s fairly easy to see that there aren’t many Contacts that meet the criteria for each of these Shared Filters. In table format with percentages, this is what we see:

 

Criteria
Contacts in Filter
Engagement Rate

Form Submission - Last 3 Days

10.0%

Form Submission - Last 7 Days

40.1%

Form Submission - Last 30 Days

150.3%

Visited High Value Web Content - Last 3 Days

10.0%

Visited High Value Web Content - Last 7 Days

20.2%

Visited High Value Web Content - Last 30 Days

90.0%

3+ Website Visits - Last 3 Days

10.0%

3+ Website Visits - Last 7 Days

20.0%

3+ Website Visits - Last 30 Days

70.1%

Email Click-through - Last 3 Days

0

0.0%

Email Click-through - Last 7 Days

0

0.0%

Email Click-through - Last 30 Days

0

0.0%

High Touch Event Attendance - Last 6 Months

0

0.0%

TOTAL Contacts

5,194

Average Engagement


0.1%

 

For most new Eloqua customers, your results will look quite similar to the above because you don’t have activity history yet for your Contacts. Make sure you’re rolling out campaigns to your database (emails with links to landing or other web pages) and driving traffic to your website that is likely to result in an Eloqua Form submission. Not only does this drive up your overall engagement, but it also performs the critical step of turning an unknown visitor to a known visitor, i.e., a Contact.

 

If you’ve been using Eloqua long enough to have history against your scoring criteria, your rules just may be too tight. Perhaps you don’t send out email campaigns as often as the Email Click-through criteria warrants, or drive as many return visits as you expect. Consider changing the time ranges or the activity quantity (e.g., 2 visits rather than 3) in your criteria.

 

 

Auditing Your Scoring Program

A common question from customers is how often they should audit the results of their scoring program. Our best practice recommendation is at least every 6 months.  As I mentioned, things can change quickly!

 

Periodically benchmark your results following the instructions above to identify trends – are the overall scores trending up or down? As part of your audit, you should further assess your results anecdotally by interviewing your sales team (is the scoring working/helpful?), reviewing against conversion rates (does an A1 truly move through the funnel more quickly than a C3?), and of course against any additional goals you set out in developing your scoring criteria.

 

We'd love to hear about some of your recommendations and best practices for monitoring and auditing your lead scoring programs. What are some of the benchmarks you use?

Just getting started with reporting in Eloqua Insight? Here are some great beginner tips to help you hit the ground running with your reporting!

 

Use the “Search” to find your reports

Try searching on a keyword if you’re having trouble finding a report by browsing through the folders. You might be amazed at what you discover!

BeginnerInsightTips-1.png

See a definition of a report metric by mousing over the column name

Not sure how “click-to-open rate” is calculated in a report? Simply hover over that column header, and you’ll see the data used, like so:

BeginnerInsightTips-2.png

Correctly define time ranges in your prompts

Make sure you’re pulling your report date ranges correctly: you have the option of either a time span (e.g., last 2 months) or a time range (Oct 1 - Oct 31). But you have to configure only one!

BeginnerInsightTips-3.png

Another important note on time ranges: if you’re looking at the Email Analysis report, the engagement metrics (open, click, etc.) captured in the report covers all time, even though you've configured a time range. In other words, if you look at the Analysis report for emails sent on Oct 1, but there is open activity on Oct 2, it will all be captured in this report. In contrast, if you look at the Email Open Overview report for Oct 1 for that email, it will only show opens for that date.

 

Use Filters to narrow your report results

After you’ve run your report, take advantage of Filters to see just the data you need. For example, assuming you have a strong naming convention for your Emails, and you want to report on engagement for just your demo invites, create a Filter rule that looks for Email Names containing “Demo”, like so:

BeginnerInsightTips-4.png

Send yourself a report as a file attached to an email.

Need to export report data to yourself or a colleague? Simply run the report, go to the Home tab, and click “Send Now”, like so:

BeginnerInsightTips-5.png

Capture Forms and Landing Pages used in your Campaigns onto the Canvas for easy reporting

As you develop your Campaigns on the Canvas, make sure that you drag over the respective Assets from the left pane and select your Form(s) and Landing Page(s) linked from your Emails. Eloqua Insight will automatically capture all your Campaign engagement activity into one report (Campaign Analysis) if you do this!

BeginnerInsightTips-6.png

Have some other quick tips you’d like to share with other new Insight users? Post them below!

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