0 Replies Latest reply: Dec 6, 2011 2:52 AM by snmdla RSS

    Beehive enhancement of the day: implement OBEO cache download on demand

    snmdla
      Today, let's have a look at an issue that also might help to
      improve the search experience: according to my knowledge,
      Thunderbird will always behave in a way that, when an IMAP folder
      is not up to date or not cached altogether, a search will trigger
      a download to satisfy the search request (if server side search
      is not configured - which is supported by TB with beehive as a
      server).

      This may slow down the searches on first searching, but will
      provide complete and correct search results.

      OBEO on the other hand will return no results if the cache is
      empty or configured to do only header download while you are
      requesting a full text search.

      Users need to both configure their folders for sync and for full
      download to enable full text searches.

      To enhance the user search experience we created the following
      enhancement request:

      ER 12325278 - OBEO: IMPLEMENT CACHE DOWNLOAD LOAD ON DEMAND TO
      AVOID INCORRECT SEARCH RESULTS

      You are welcomed to second this request through MOS.

      With this posting I will pause my series of "beehive enhancement of
      the day": I posted the most pressing issues for our site.

      If you look at it, these issues are manageable in count and severity.

      Beehive is a powerful, well designed product, running very stable at
      our site.

      Oracle need only go one step further, revise its decision not to
      release 2.1 (2.2 etc.) and do some serious marketing to keep the hive
      buzzing / make the hive buzz.

      To all of you running a beehive installation: please do revise my last
      weeks postings, do sound your assent in this forum or do address
      support to further the enhancement requests. Do post your own
      suggestions for enhancing beehive.

      I hope Oracle will spent some sugar for the bees to survice the
      winter and welcome spring next year.

      Thanks and regards, Thomas