12 Replies Latest reply on Apr 13, 2012 4:23 PM by Dude!

    How to compile Oracle Linux source?

    909525
      I accidentally downloaded source DVD "Oracle Linux Release 5 Update 2 source - DVD" instead of installable ISO image. Is there anyway I can compile it to make bootable ISO image?

      I tried to search this forum as well as other places but couldn't find any information hence thought of opening a thread before I proceed to download correct file which will again take 10+ hrs with my Internet speed :(

      Any help is highly appreciated. Also I need to know which packages are required to be installed for compiling the source if at all that is possible. I am using Ubuntu 11.10 Desktop.

      Thanks in advance for any help and hope to get a reply soon :) I need to urgently install Oracle 11gR2 on it.

      Edited by: user6582219 on Apr 12, 2012 1:10 AM

      While browsing the forum for any possible solution I came to a thread that discuss installation of a package oracle-rdbms-server-11gR2-preinstall. When searched through search engine I came to know about recent certification Oracle 11gR2 on Oracle Linux 6, here is the link https://blogs.oracle.com/linux/entry/announcing_oracle_database_11g_r2
      https://blogs.oracle.com/linux/entry/announcing_oracle_database_11g_r2

      Thing is I already have Oracle Linux 6 Update 2 (the latest) installed on my machine in dual boot mode so I dropped the idea of installing version 5.2. As per the documentation 11gR2 was not certified earlier on Linux 6.2 so I thought of installing 5.2 but it is not necessary now.

      I would still appreciate if someone could answer my question just for knowing the procedure compiling source. May be it can help someone else trying to achieve this.

      I have another couple of important questions and need guidance from the experts over here. I am not sure if it is appropriate to open a new thread but for now I am posting them here.

      Before proceeding here are my environment details:

      Machine: x86 32 bit with 2 GB RAM/250 GB HD.
      OS: Kubuntu 11.10 Desktop and Oracle Linux 6 Update 2 in dual boot mode.

      Here are my partition details for your reference but as I am planning to do the installation from the scratch following new ideal scheme you can jump to last paragraph following the line "*********************************" for my questions.

      Unfortunately my partition plan went wrong and here is what I have now:
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
      255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
      Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
      Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
      I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
      Disk identifier: 0x3d5ba9e1

      Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
      /dev/sda1 * 2048 1002047 500000 83 Linux
      /dev/sda2 151525080 361253654 104864287+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
      /dev/sda4 1003518 151001087 74998785 5 Extended
      /dev/sda5 1003520 7002111 2999296 82 Linux swap / Solaris
      /dev/sda6 7004160 11001855 1998848 83 Linux
      /dev/sda7 11003904 51001343 19998720 83 Linux
      /dev/sda8 51003392 110041087 29518848 83 Linux

      Partition table entries are not in disk order
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      /dev/sda1 here is /tmp, /dev/sda2 is my data partition, I have separate /home / (root) partition for Kubuntu and remianing around 20 GB in extended partition is used for Oracle Linux 6.2 with default Oracle suggested LVM partition. I also have separate /boot for Kubuntu and I chose not to install grub while installing Oracle Linux. I later modified grub.cfg to add entries for Oracle Linux and now I can boot both OSs successfully.

      My issue now is I cannot extend 20 GB space (in extended partition) that I have given to Oracle though I have around 40 GB space available. This is because I alreay have 4 primary partitions (one for /boot others for "data" and one extended partition). So I have to make primary partition out of free space and install Oracle in a single partition without following recommended partition layout scheme.

      *********************************

      Now I want to do the installation of both the OS from the scratch and really need an advice on partition layout scheme. Here is summary of what I wan to achieve:

      1. Keep the "data" partition (primary) intact and carve an ideal partition layout for both the OS with separate /boot, /tmp, /home, swap (and may be for /usr???). Also may be I can share swap?

      2. How do I go about using LVM and is it recommended for this case? What would be ideal locations for each partitions and sizes? I already used 100 GB for "data" so now I want to keep 60 GB for Oracle Linux (and Oracle DB for which I will again make few sub-partitions) and remaining will be for Kubuntu.

      Well, I am not sure if this is the right place to ask these questions but since I can see very knowlegeable top contributors here that are willing to help novice users I thought of posting these questions.

      I would really really appreciate if someone can provide me rough draft of partition scheme in my case considering the sub-partitions needed for Oracle DB. I went thorugh number of forums and documentations to come up with solutuion and finally thought of getting help after much confusion.

      I really need to carefully plan this time because it's third time I am doing reinstallation from the scratch because of poor plan I followed previously.

      Thank you very much in advance and please let me know in case more information is needed from my side.

      Regards,
      Ramesh
        • 1. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
          LenzGrimmer
          Rolling your own distribution off the source RPMs is not an easy task. In addition to the required compilation resources (an entire build would likely take much longer on a single system than simply downloading the bootable ISO), you need to assemble the proper directory structure and boot images. While the scripts exits, setting this up takes time and experience.

          With regards to your other questions, I suggest to open a new discussion thread instead of lumping it all in one message. On a general note, LVM is much more flexible than using a fixed partitioning scheme, as you can dynamically resize the logical volumes without having to redo your partitioning again.
          • 2. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
            Dude!
            I accidentally downloaded source DVD "Oracle Linux Release 5 Update 2 source - DVD" instead of installable ISO image. Is there anyway I can compile it to make bootable ISO image?
            Google will be your best friend for such a question, for instance, "Creating a Custom centos Linux bootable ISO Image". There is no need to duplicate the effort. I recommend you download the correct installation DVD, e.g. 5.8
            Thing is I already have Oracle Linux 6 Update 2 (the latest) installed on my machine in dual boot mode so I dropped the idea of installing version 5.2. As per the documentation 11gR2 was not certified earlier on Linux 6.2 so I thought of installing 5.2 but it is not necessary now.
            So you don't need to install 5.2 anymore, but you want the information how to compile a installation DVD from the 5.2 source anyway?!
            I have another couple of important questions and need guidance from the experts over here. I am not sure if it is appropriate to open a new thread but for now I am posting them here.
            Questions may be important for you, but not necessarily for others. No one will complain if you create a new thread for particular questions or subjects. It is better to separate your topics and questions rather than creating a multi-mega thread, which does little to help anyone else but you. It means more work on your end, but it will be easier for anyone to participate or answer your questions, and it will allow you to better award answers.

            Regarding your partitioning questions: It is generally difficult to address such topics in a forum. You are asking for a book of information. My advice is to drop the old fashioned concepts of dual or triple boot options and install Oracle VirtualBox instead. It will make all of these questions obsolete and you can use whatever defaults when installing your virtual machine guest OS. Its a far more superior way of dealing with multiple operating systems on one and the same computer.
            I am using Ubuntu 11.10 Desktop.
            I need to urgently install Oracle 11gR2 on it.
            For what it's worth, if you can combine the two source below you should be able to install and run 11gR2 on Ubuntu 11.10.

            Install Oracle 11gR2 on Ubuntu Linux 11.04 (64-bit) Howto
            Install Oracle 11gR2 on Ubuntu Linux 11.04 (64-bit) Howto
            Oracle 11gR2 Express Edition on Linux Ubuntu 11.10 howto
            Oracle 11gR2 Express Edition on Linux Ubuntu 11.10 howto

            However, check out VirtualBox.
            • 3. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
              909525
              Thanks Lenz, your advice on using LVM makes sense.
              • 4. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                909525
                Many thanks Dude for the links. My machine is having 32 bit processor so Oracle Express won't help. And sorry if I sounded like I am asking for an immediate attention, that was not my intention. I have come across so many different thoughts on partitioning from different people on number of forums that I got totally confused and thought this would be the best place to check what the experts here have to say before I go with my own intution. Anyways, I have decided to search for manuels of different distros and come up with something based on suggestions there.

                Thanks again :)
                • 5. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                  Dude!
                  Administrators will have all kinds of preference whether to put /var /tmp, etc. on it's own partitions. The pressing reasons for partitions are more or less due to historical technical limits and fail-safe requirements that are no longer relevant or questionable and seem totally unnecessary for your setup. You don't need to partition your Linux installation at all. You will only increase your risk of a complete loss of all your data because of a single failure in managing partitions or trying to bend a fixed setup.

                  Someone asking for immediate attention is not a problem for me - I don't have to respond if I can't be bothered. I did not really suggest to you to install Oracle XE edition, rather you can combine the information to install Enterprise Edition under Ubuntu 11.10 if you really have to. You will need to work around ora-0845, for instance. Or install Ubuntu 11.04. Or even better, install VirtualBox and install a supported OS. If you do not have a x86-64 CPU, less than 4 GB of RAM, then of course your mileage will vary. Keep in mind that Oracle 11gR2 Enterprise is quite resource demanding. Your system may not meet the minimum requirements.
                  • 6. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                    909525
                    Thank you again Dude. Per your suggestions regarding partitioning, I have come up with the following scheme:

                    /dev/sda (225GB)
                    +-/dev/sda1   /boot (1GB, ext2)
                    +-/dev/sda2   "DATA" (100GB ext4)
                    +-/dev/sda3   swap  (3GB)
                    +-/dev/sda4   /home (80GB, ext4)
                    +-------/dev/sda5  /root (KUbuntu 11.10, 10GB, ext4)
                    +-------/dev/sda6  /root (OEL 6.2, 10GB, ext4)
                    +-------/dev/sda7  /oradata (11gR2, 20GB, ext4)

                    I intend to use Oracle only for learning purposes so guess this scheme would be alright.

                    My limitations are I cannot upgrade RAM so VM is out of the question though I would anytime prefer that. Also, I don't want to install Oracle DB on uncertified distro and lose it's relaibility. I would have installed only OEL but some user-friendly desktop is required for other members at home. I had used 11gR2 previously on the same machine on Win Vista without any problem so guess it would not be an issue here also as long as I don't open too many application when using 11g.

                    So I think I am ready to go now with the installation. Thanks much for taking time and your suggestions regarding partitioning really helped me to drop the idea of making too many unnecessary partitions. Can you please drop a line in case if you think there is something wrong with this scheme?
                    • 7. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                      Dude!
                      I think your allocation for OL 6.2 and Oracle is too small. You will probably need to create additional swap space or setup a swapfile for Oracle RDBMS. You will also need to install X-Windows, which is not included by default, in order to run the Oracle Installer and use the DB console, unless you do a non-interactive or silent install and have another system at home for a remote installation. Where do you plan to install the Oracle software? I would double the space to 20 GB, at least.

                      The space you have allocated for /oradata directory will most likely not get you too far if you plan to use archivelog and study backup and recovery and use the fast recovery area. It might do if you really watch your space.

                      When you mention reliability, keep in mind that Oracle Linux is Enterprise Linux and not designed to support Laptop or Desktop hardware. Like many others, you may run into compatibility issues with your video, networking/wireless, power management and touchpad support if you have such.
                      1 person found this helpful
                      • 8. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                        909525
                        I can make OEL6.2 /(root) partition as 20GB instead of 10GB or even more if required. My /home is shared between two distros and so is /boot and /swap (3GB). I originally had plan to use separate /home and /boot for both the distros and had my friend that knows linux much better than me review the plan. Per his suggestion I am sharing the these two partitions. I am not much sure at the moment if this will cause any serious side-effect later. I will check with him again when he is available for discussion and post here again so you can take a look at the final scheme and offer further suggestions whenever you get some free time.

                        Regarding possible hardware issues that you have mentioned, luckily I have encountered none of them. As mentioned earlier I already have OEL6.2 installed in dual boot mode on my machine but due to poor partition plan I am again installing both the OS from the scratch. In my current setup I have both Gnome and KDE desktops installed for OEL6.2 just for testing purposes and both run fine. In fact I experience much faster response from the system when using KDE on OEL6.2 than on Ubuntu. My wired Internet connection also works just fine. It detected my ethernet card and got configured itself automatically. I just had to add correct MAC address. I didn't check video/sound but guess that shouldn't be an issue.

                        Regarding swap space, I guess Oracle Universal Installer won't complain and happily accept 3GB as it is as per the requirement. As mentioned previously I could run 11gR2 without any issues on the same machine on Win Vista. Also, I had Fedora10 linux installed in dual boot with Vista that time running 11gR1 (not R2) without any complaints. So I guess everything should be fine until a time comes when I will need to install 12g :) By that time I will probablly have a brand new machine with latest hardware configuration :)

                        Thanks Buddy for all your help and I will come back to you again tomorrow to request you to take a look at my finalized scheme. Good day!
                        • 9. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                          909525
                          Hi Dude:

                          Here is my revised plan. I modified the plan as I don't feel comfortable sharing the /home and /boot partition so now except swap everything is separate. What are your thoughts on this?

                          Many thanks for your time and attention.

                          /dev/sda (225GB)
                          +-/dev/sda1            /boot        (500MB, ext2)   Kubuntu11.10
                          +-/dev/sda2            data         (100GB, ext4)   Shared (non OS files)
                          +-/dev/sda3            swap        (3GB, ext3)      Shared
                          +-/dev/sda4            extended  (120GB, ext4)
                          +-/dev/sda5       /tmp         (2GB, ext4)      Kubuntu11.10
                          +-/dev/sda6       /home     (15GB, ext4)     Kubuntu11.10 
                          +-/dev/sda7       /             (20GB, ext4)     Kubuntu 11.10
                          +-/dev/sda8       /boot       (500MB, ext4)   OEL6.2
                          +-/dev/sda9       /tmp        (2GB, ext4)      OEL6.2
                          +-/dev/sda10     /home     (10GB, ext4)     OEL6.2
                          +-/dev/sda11     /             (15GB, ext4)     OEL6.2
                          -/dev/sda12    /oracle     (20GB, ext4)     Oracle11gR2 datafiles + tools
                          Free Space = 15GB
                          • 10. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                            Dude!
                            For the purpose of what you are trying to accomplish I would do the following:

                            1 primary partition for Kubuntu (20 GB)
                            1 primary partition for OL 6.2 (20 GB)
                            1 primary partition for swap Kubuntu/OL 6.2 ( 5 GB )
                            1 extended partition (ext3) for Oracle db files and FRA (30 GB)
                            1 extended partition for a shared disk (100 GB)

                            which leaves another 50 GB for your distribution. I suggest to forget about all these partitions you are thinking about because you are going to waste a lot of space and lock yourself into a possible position having to resize your partitions later. You have no need to protect partitions like /home or /tmp from filling up your disk - if that happens boot into another system, mount your other partition and clean the problem. You don't need a /boot partition. For compatibility reasons you should not have more than 4 primary partitions. I suggest to install the grub bootloader on your first partition.
                            • 11. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                              909525
                              This sounds GREAT Dude! Simple and flexible. Only thing is my 100GB DATA partition is already a primary and is almost 75% filled up so I plan to create SWAP inside extended partition instead of as a primary partition. Guess that would not cause any issues later. I am already using SWAP in extended partition and never got into any troubles so far. Thanks.
                              • 12. Re: How to compile Oracle Linux source?
                                Dude!
                                Actually you don't even need a swap partition. You can create a swapfile that will reside just like any other file on your system instead of a swap partition. It can be automatically installed at system startup:

                                <pre>
                                dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile1 bs=1024 count=1048576
                                mkswap /swapfile1
                                swapon /swapfile1
                                chown root:root swapfile1
                                chmod 0600 /swapfile1
                                swapon -a
                                echo 'swapfile1 swap swap defaults 0 0' >> /etc/fstab
                                </pre>

                                The advantage will be that you can add or remove swap space without having to repartition your drive.