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3 Replies Latest reply: May 21, 2012 11:19 PM by Navneet - Oracle RSS

Managed server IP's for Exalogic servers

decEpticOn Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
Hi,

We have created cluster of managed server on exalogic machine. While configuring it we used public IP's of all nodes on all managed server's listen address and in cluster address.

Not sure if this is correct approach, do we need to mention private IP's of exalogic node anywhere; since infiniband would be from private IP's... if we need to mention where should it be used? If not how will it use infiniband?

Thanks!
  • 1. Re: Managed server IP's for Exalogic servers
    RenévanWijk Oracle ACE
    Currently Being Moderated
    Maybe it helps: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E18476_01/doc.220/e18479/net.htm#CIHGAJBJ shows the steps for General Network and InfiniBand Setup.

    And documentation how to enable Exalogic-Specific enhancements in WebLogic - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E18476_01/doc.220/e18479/optimization.htm#BABGCJFH
  • 2. Re: Managed server IP's for Exalogic servers
    decEpticOn Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Hi Thanks for the reply..

    sorry bit late but, I just saw the exalogic machine assigned to us only have private and public ip's configured by exalogic admin's...

    What are floating IP's? I just read a doc, but didn't understood what exactly we need to put as listen address for managed server's? and on what ip can we hit request's?

    Can u please explain in short...

    Thanks a lot...
  • 3. Re: Managed server IP's for Exalogic servers
    Navneet - Oracle Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Hi,

    Load balancing websites can be acheived by putting 2 entries in your DNS, for instance:

    www.example.com 192.168.1.1
    www.example.com 192.168.1.2

    then DNS will do a round Robin between them, but should either host fail then your will see intermittant loss when surfing, as the DNS will still point to either IP in turn.

    If you want failover, for instance:

    host1.example.com 192.168.1.1 (master)
    host2.example.com 192.168.1.2 (slave)

    and the floating ip as you call it

    float.example.com 192.168.1.3

    Then you would need scripts that run as often as you can on slave, to see if master is still there (sometimes referred to as a heartbeat).

    if the Master drops, then it needs run a script to bring the floating ip up on the slave to resume service.

    A google search for heartbeat, failover should yield some howtos on the subject.

    Hope that helps.


    The above explanation is derived from here: http://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=671377

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