5 Replies Latest reply: Aug 30, 2012 6:50 AM by EdStevens RSS

    Remote server connectivity

    848959
      I have few basic doubts about Oracle connectivity, lol. I have the below TNS alias entry,

      Test1 =
      (DESCRIPTION =
      (ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = servert1.domain.com)(PORT = 1521))
      (ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = servert2.domain.com)(PORT = 1521))
      (LOAD_BALANCE = yes)
      (CONNECT_DATA =
      (SERVER = DEDICATED)
      (SERVICE_NAME = testservice.domain.com)
      )
      )


      1) My remote server name is servert1.domain.com and servert2.domain.com, this name is not stored in my
      local system "C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts" file. No changes are made over here, or in the windows registry, still it works.

      How this name is converted to IP address and when I ping "servert1.domain.com", how it is able to respond?

      2) servert1.domain.com and servert2.domain.com, these are Remote servers, my silly doubt is, how Oracle is able to reach this server
      fromy Local server?

      3) My sqlnet.ora contains the below statements, how this helps to reach my Remote host server and contact the listener service?

      SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES= (NTS)
      NAMES.DIRECTORY_PATH= (TNSNAMES, EZCONNECT)

      4) How do I make my the Oracle server running on my local desktop system, connected to my office network, to the outside world, make it as
      a remote server, so that I can connect to this from anywhere?

      5) I couldn't go through all the details about Oracle connectivity and SQL*Net, could you provide me few links to understand it fully.

      Thanks a lot.
        • 1. Re: Remote server connectivity
          sb92075
          when all else fails Read The Fine Manual

          http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/network.112/e10836/toc.htm
          • 2. Re: Remote server connectivity
            EdStevens
            845956 wrote:
            I have few basic doubts about Oracle connectivity, lol. I have the below TNS alias entry,

            Test1 =
            (DESCRIPTION =
            (ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = servert1.domain.com)(PORT = 1521))
            (ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP)(HOST = servert2.domain.com)(PORT = 1521))
            (LOAD_BALANCE = yes)
            (CONNECT_DATA =
            (SERVER = DEDICATED)
            (SERVICE_NAME = testservice.domain.com)
            )
            )


            1) My remote server name is servert1.domain.com and servert2.domain.com, this name is not stored in my
            local system "C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts" file. No changes are made over here, or in the windows registry, still it works.

            How this name is converted to IP address and when I ping "servert1.domain.com", how it is able to respond?
            Oracle's tns layer is just another layer on top of the standard network stack. Oracle passes a request to the networks stack, to be sent to servert1.domain.com. The network stack tries to resolve from your local hosts file and from a dns server. So if you have nothing in hosts, it is being resolved by a request to dns. Oracle knows nothing about this.
            2) servert1.domain.com and servert2.domain.com, these are Remote servers, my silly doubt is, how Oracle is able to reach this server
            fromy Local server?
            Standard networking protocols.
            3) My sqlnet.ora contains the below statements, how this helps to reach my Remote host server and contact the listener service?

            SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES= (NTS)
            NAMES.DIRECTORY_PATH= (TNSNAMES, EZCONNECT)
            that part has nothing to do with it, other than to tell tns use tnsames first, then ezeconnect second, in trying to resolve the requested connect string.

            >
            4) How do I make my the Oracle server running on my local desktop system, connected to my office network, to the outside world, make it as
            a remote server, so that I can connect to this from anywhere?
            You probably can't. Not if your net admins are doing their job.

            >
            5) I couldn't go through all the details about Oracle connectivity and SQL*Net, could you provide me few links to understand it fully.
            Start here - http://edstevensdba.wordpress.com/2011/02/09/sqlnet_overview/

            and follow the rest of the related posts at that site.

            Thanks a lot.
            • 3. Re: Remote server connectivity
              848959
              Hi Ed Stevens,

              Many many thanks for providing crisp answers!

              I will definitely go through the Oracle document and your blog, looks pretty good, will definitely explore more there.

              Could you provide a little more details on the below,

              1) Abbout SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES= (NTS) entry in SQLNET.ora file.

              2) At #4, I asked about making my local desktop system, available to the outside world as a remote server and you said I probably can't. if net admins are doing their job.

              What I actually wanted to ask is, we work with our real server, and I have no clue how they are setup for network connectivity and its related things.
              Assume, I have a given a server with Oracle installed with all the required provisions, to make it visible to the world, how to take care of this and steps to handle this, please give a brief overview and any other references requierd, I will go through them.

              Thank you again.
              • 4. Re: Remote server connectivity
                sb92075
                845956 wrote:
                Hi Ed Stevens,

                Many many thanks for providing crisp answers!

                I will definitely go through the Oracle document and your blog, looks pretty good, will definitely explore more there.

                Could you provide a little more details on the below,

                1) Abbout SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES= (NTS) entry in SQLNET.ora file.
                unwilling or incapable to use GOOGLE or just Read The Fine Manual yourself?

                >
                2) At #4, I asked about making my local desktop system, available to the outside world as a remote server and you said I probably can't. if net admins are doing their job.

                What I actually wanted to ask is, we work with our real server, and I have no clue how they are setup for network connectivity and its related things.
                Assume, I have a given a server with Oracle installed with all the required provisions, to make it visible to the world, how to take care of this and steps to handle this, please give a brief overview and any other references requierd, I will go through them.

                Thank you again.
                If your database is exposed to the whole Internet, it can be hacked & compromised.
                My Production DB Server sit behind TWO different Firewall boxes to protect its contents.
                • 5. Re: Remote server connectivity
                  EdStevens
                  845956 wrote:
                  Hi Ed Stevens,

                  Many many thanks for providing crisp answers!

                  I will definitely go through the Oracle document and your blog, looks pretty good, will definitely explore more there.

                  Could you provide a little more details on the below,

                  1) Abbout SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES= (NTS) entry in SQLNET.ora file.
                  Have you read the documentation? If so, specifically what do you not understand - perhaps I can help clarify. If you have not read the documentation, please do so.

                  >
                  2) At #4, I asked about making my local desktop system, available to the outside world as a remote server and you said I probably can't. if net admins are doing their job.

                  What I actually wanted to ask is, we work with our real server, and I have no clue how they are setup for network connectivity and its related things.
                  Assume, I have a given a server with Oracle installed with all the required provisions, to make it visible to the world, how to take care of this and steps to handle this, please give a brief overview and any other references requierd, I will go through them.
                  I can only reiterate what SB said. Exposing your database to the internet is a HUGE security risk. I don't care how benign your data is. If it's worth putting in a database, it's worth protecting. That protection not only includes backup/recovery (you are in archivelog mode and taking regular rman backups, aren't you?) but also access security.

                  The details of both have filled entire books, beginning - again - with the documentation.
                  Thank you again.
                  And since I keep referring to documnetation, let me give you my boilerplate on the subject:

                  =================================================
                  Learning how to look things up in the documentation is time well spent investing in your career. To that end, you should drop everything else you are doing and do the following:

                  Go to tahiti.oracle.com.

                  Drill down to your product and version.

                  <b><i><u>BOOKMARK THAT LOCATION</u></i></b>

                  Spend a few minutes just getting familiar with what is available here. Take special note of the "books" and "search" tabs. Under the "books" tab you will find the complete documentation library.

                  Spend a few minutes just getting familiar with what <b><i><u>kind</u></i></b> of documentation is available there by simply browsing the titles under the "Books" tab.

                  Open the Reference Manual and spend a few minutes looking through the table of contents to get familiar with what <b><i><u>kind</u></i></b> of information is available there.

                  Do the same with the SQL Reference Manual.

                  Do the same with the Utilities manual.

                  You don't have to read the above in depth. They are <b><i><u>reference</b></i></u> manuals. Just get familiar with <b><i><u>what</b></i></u> is there to <b><i><u>be</b></i></u> referenced. Ninety percent of the questions asked on this forum can be answered in less than 5 minutes by simply searching one of the above manuals.

                  Then set yourself a plan to dig deeper.
                  - Read a chapter a day from the Concepts Manual.
                  - Take a look in your alert log. One of the first things listed at startup is the initialization parms with non-default values. Read up on each one of them (listed in your alert log) in the Reference Manual.
                  - Take a look at your listener.ora, tnsnames.ora, and sqlnet.ora files. Go to the Network Administrators manual and read up on everything you see in those files.
                  - When you have finished reading the Concepts Manual, do it again.

                  Give a man a fish and he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime.

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