8 Replies Latest reply: Jan 3, 2013 4:19 PM by EdStevens RSS

    maximum tables supported by oracle

    951290
      hi ,

      We are having a production database configured in oracle 10.2.0.4 ( standard edition) and its contains near to 50000 tables . The database is accumulated by more than 100 tables everyday,

      and my question is is there is any table limits in oracle database ? especially in standard edition ??


      rgds

      mahi
        • 1. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
          sb92075
          948287 wrote:
          hi ,

          We are having a production database configured in oracle 10.2.0.4 ( standard edition) and its contains near to 50000 tables . The database is accumulated by more than 100 tables everyday,
          SURELY "designed" by an amateur that does not conform to Third Normal Form.
          • 2. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
            rp0428
            >
            is there is any table limits in oracle database ? especially in standard edition ??
            >
            No - most of the limits are listed in the Logical Database Limits section of the Database doc
            http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/limits003.htm
            • 3. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
              Keith Jamieson
              Looks at watch: Checks to see its not 1st April.
              • 4. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
                moreajays
                hi,

                No limit, as much as your storage space available which can allocate at least a initial extent

                Thanks,
                Ajay More
                http://moreajays.blogspot.com
                • 5. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
                  jgarry
                  I dunno, I could envision someone making a homegrown partitioning scheme in SE that is relational, sensible and cheap.
                  • 6. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
                    EdStevens
                    jgarry wrote:
                    I dunno, I could envision someone making a homegrown partitioning scheme in SE that is relational, sensible and cheap.
                    Even at that (and I have the notes on that tacked to the wall of my cubical - we are an SE shop and I may need to use the technique) it's hard to imagine a rational design that's adding "more than 100 tables everyday"
                    • 7. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
                      jgarry
                      Two daily tables with 50 states? Gets to 100 fast... just no info to know if it is stupid MS-think or what.

                      (In the early eighties, I worked for a department store concession that had files being uploaded nightly from hundreds of remote sites nationwide - with current tech, I could see external tables in such a use, though I would expect everything online these days anyways. I remember laughing at a story told in a computer class that Levi's outside salespeople would upload orders from payphones, but it didn't work with General Telephone equipment. [url http://www.retrojunk.com/content/commercial/23349/index/]Gee, no GTE was an ad at the time. Remember payphones?).
                      • 8. Re: maximum tables supported by oracle
                        EdStevens
                        jgarry wrote:
                        Two daily tables with 50 states? Gets to 100 fast... just no info to know if it is stupid MS-think or what.

                        (In the early eighties, I worked for a department store concession that had files being uploaded nightly from hundreds of remote sites nationwide - with current tech, I could see external tables in such a use, though I would expect everything online these days anyways. I remember laughing at a story told in a computer class that Levi's outside salespeople would upload orders from payphones, but it didn't work with General Telephone equipment. [url http://www.retrojunk.com/content/commercial/23349/index/]Gee, no GTE was an ad at the time. Remember payphones?).
                        and "party lines"

                        :-)