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3 Replies Latest reply: Jan 12, 2013 12:34 PM by alan.pae RSS

Solaris 11.1 - Personal Use

nixbox Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
Hi All,

I am planning to install Oracle Solaris 11.1 on my home machine which is :

Core i7 2600K Processor
Gigabyte Motherboard
Dual Intel 1Gb Nics
32GB RAM
1 x 80 GB SATA (Solaris will be installed on this drive)
4 x 2TB SATA3 Disks ( Will be used to store data)
2 x 120 GB SSDs (Cache - Not sure yet) or will add them later.

I am planning on installing Solaris 11.1 as this will provide me with some storage to play at home with zfs while learning Solaris 11.1 at home and getting familiar with it more and more.

I have used Solaris before and have used Opensolaris as well.

Now the question is :

a) I have read for non-commercial use Solaris is free ? is this true ?
b) I know it is a free download, if I install, will I be able to get updates like other linux distros (I know this is not linux) frequently ?
c) What will you recommend instead of Solaris - or this is ok ?
d) Any thoughts on the hardware ? Compatibility ? Any graphics card should work or is solaris very specific ? I have 2 Nvidia Quadro cards lying around as spares as well.

Will be grateful for your suggestions / expert advises !

Thanks
  • 1. Re: Solaris 11.1 - Personal Use
    Dave Miner Explorer
    Currently Being Moderated
    The download page on OTN provides access to the license terms. I'd suggest you read them for yourself and decide how they apply to your planned usage.

    Access to the support repositories requires a support contract.

    Regarding support of specific hardware, the compatibility list on OTN may prove helpful. The best answer is to download the live CD and boot it; the device driver utility can be used to scan your hardware and report on driver support.
  • 2. Re: Solaris 11.1 - Personal Use
    bigdelboy Pro
    Currently Being Moderated
    nixbox wrote:
    Hi All,

    I am planning to install Oracle Solaris 11.1 on my home machine which is :

    Core i7 2600K Processor
    Gigabyte Motherboard
    Dual Intel 1Gb Nics
    32GB RAM
    1 x 80 GB SATA (Solaris will be installed on this drive)
    4 x 2TB SATA3 Disks ( Will be used to store data)
    2 x 120 GB SSDs (Cache - Not sure yet) or will add them later.
    To start of with I'd agrre with what dave said.
    I am planning on installing Solaris 11.1 as this will provide me with some storage to play at home with zfs while learning Solaris 11.1 at home and getting familiar with it more and more.

    I have used Solaris before and have used Opensolaris as well.
    Great
    Now the question is :

    a) I have read for non-commercial use Solaris is free ? is this true ?
    I have to say read the license carefully
    b) I know it is a free download, if I install, will I be able to get updates like other linux distros (I know this is not linux) frequently ?
    Under the current regime you should be able to get access to updates issued once a year, not the interim monthly SRU's however.

    Occaisonally something can break ... through sometimes there might be a workarround. Search the recent angst with iSCSI on the forum.

    https://blogs.oracle.com/Solaris11Life/entry/solaris_11_process_enhancement_no
    https://blogs.oracle.com/patch/
    https://blogs.oracle.com/patch/entry/new_solaris_11_customer_maintenance

    c) What will you recommend instead of Solaris - or this is ok ?
    Obviously Oracle Linux is a consideration.
    ... If I went into 'sales' mode I'd say:
    - Great new filesystems btrfs and zfs available to raid your storage. NOTE ( I thought I understood zfs was available on oracle linux .... but I've never tried it) ... now not so sure
    - Support available, including through ULN (Unbreakable unix network).
    - Ability to run solaris 11 (and other stuff) through virtualbox contained (possbile performance degradation).

    That said I'd trust Solaris zfs before the two above. And I'd leave you to work out what people are saying about the downsides. Having said that I'd say Oracle are very keen to say their btrfs nd zfs implementations are good. Even ext4 with the raid manager and volume manager is quite capable. And solaris 11 also has virtualbox. Obviousl anything detailed on Oracle Linux on the Oracle Linux forum.

    My understanding (possiblly imperfect) is For peak performance zfs likes to have the whole disk device. However partitions may give you flexibility at a little cost in speed. It might give you better options for switching filesystems types. Please note I suspect having both zfs and btrfs might cost you memory. virtualbox may also cost you a little network performance.

    Anyway you can watch this from someone using zfs on their home server:-
    - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxOVgUTxniw

    Neither of the two are desktop orientated, though both will do a desktop. Other distros may do the desktop better but be less well orientated at zfs / btrfs.
    d) Any thoughts on the hardware ? Compatibility ? Any graphics card should work or is solaris very specific ? I have 2 Nvidia Quadro cards lying around as spares as well.
    I suspect the latest bleeding edge cards may be a problem. And I have been upset with graphics cards in time past.
    Will be grateful for your suggestions / expert advises !

    Thanks
    Please dont take my advice as definitive, rather than 'expert', and as just as a couple of ideals to think about. Different people will have different priories and come to different conclusions. Your kit certainly give you some options for virtual machines.

    Edited by: bigdelboy on 12-Jan-2013 07:04 :: Noticed my comment amount zfs on oracle linux may have been incorrect. Dont know what put that into my head!
  • 3. Re: Solaris 11.1 - Personal Use
    alan.pae Journeyer
    Currently Being Moderated
    Neither of the two are desktop orientated, though both will do a desktop. Other distros may do the desktop better but be less well orientated at zfs / btrfs.
    For Solaris 11 I've taken a "Chromebook" attitude towards the desktop. You can find an online version of just about anything so instead of hoping and praying for a native desktop app or searching for a Java based one, use a search engine and find an online version and use that. I actually looked over the Chrombook apps list and added several to my list of links for Solaris users.

    alan

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