This discussion is archived
1 Reply Latest reply: Jan 13, 2013 3:35 PM by bigdelboy RSS

I overwrote ntfs with zfs, possible to recover my mistake?

896572 Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
I have an extenal disk with 1 ntfs partition and I created a new solaris partitiion using linux. I then created a zpool on solaris using the ntfs partition by mistake. I didn't create any file in the pool, is there any way to revert it back to ntfs to restore my data there ? I noticed the partition is still label as a ntfs partition.


.

Moderator Action:
Edited by: rukbat on Jan 13, 2013 12:24 PM
Title to your post has been edited to make it easier to understand your question.
  • 1. Re: I overwrote ntfs with zfs, possible to recover my mistake?
    bigdelboy Pro
    Currently Being Moderated
    user13409433 wrote:
    I have an extenal disk with 1 ntfs partition and I created a new solaris partitiion using linux. I then created a zpool on solaris using the ntfs partition by mistake. I didn't create any file in the pool, is there any way to revert it back to ntfs to restore my data there ? I noticed the partition is still label as a ntfs partition.


    .

    Moderator Action:
    Edited by: rukbat on Jan 13, 2013 12:24 PM
    Title to your post has been edited to make it easier to understand your question.
    I know far less about the workings and internals of disk layouts that others ... but these are my thoughts if I was in your shoes ....

    I would be saying ... oh dear i seem not to have a backup.

    Probably most of my data is intact; however the filesystem points are most likely incredibly badly corrupted. The creation of the zpool wil have most likely overwritten sectors that are important to ntfs.

    .....

    so one asks myself how important is the data ???? Are there some bits that are really important. If not accept the loss.

    .....

    In general:

    1) Playing about non expertly may make the corruption worse rather than better.
    2) I suggest getting the disk mounted read only and taking a backup image copy of the partitiion: Using dd or clonezilla. clonezilla is probably safe.
    3) A specialist firm might be able to see the data previously written on the disk .... very very expensive. Ok if you are agengy espionaging for vital secrets ... otherwise usually no point.
    4) Research some ntfs recovery software tools.

    ... you will have learnt. Good Luck.


    PS: Having hte partition type as ntfs is of limited use ... i suspect some vital sectors are corrupted. Hope this is of a little help. This is not my area an some knowing better may think my suggestions poor and I welcome others.

Legend

  • Correct Answers - 10 points
  • Helpful Answers - 5 points