7 Replies Latest reply: Feb 1, 2013 12:37 PM by 937454 RSS

    database bussiness flow.

    965792
      HI , I am a wannabe DBA. I never had a chance to speak to anyone who is working as a DBA. I just want to know
      1.what the daily activities of a DBA are.
      2.How many databases does a project require?
      3.On how many pieces of hardware is a database spread/installed?
      4.who is an onsite DBA.
      5.what does a dba interact with the developers and testers.
      6.what are the different database environments ( i just know two Production, Testing)?
      7. Difference between a development DBA and a production DBA.
      Thanks a lot.

      Edited by: kantamani on Jan 31, 2013 9:06 PM

      Edited by: kantamani on Jan 31, 2013 9:14 PM
        • 1. Re: database bussiness flow.
          sb92075
          kantamani wrote:
          HI , I am a wannabe DBA.
          So you decided you want to be a DBA, but you have no idea what they actually do.
          At least we know that you know 3 out of the first 4 letters of the alphabet.

          Can you spell SQL?
          • 2. Re: database bussiness flow.
            965792
            hi sb92075,
            i learned sql and plsql, i did my certifications. Had been studying Oracle Architecture for a while. I am just a fresher looking for a job more interested in being a DBA rather than a plsql developer. so i would be glad
            if you could help rather being sarcastic . Thanks for your prompt replay.
            • 3. Re: database bussiness flow.
              Billy~Verreynne
              Very open ended questions.
              1.what the daily activities of a DBA are.
              Depends from site to site and what the roles and responsibilities are. Regular daily activities should be close to zero as that means proper management, monitoring and notification tools and mechanisms are in place.
              2.How many databases does a project require?
              Physical or logical?

              There should be a single physical database per server. Said physical database can contains 1000's of logical databases (schemas in Oracle speak).

              As for how many a project requires - how long is a piece of string?
              3.On how many pieces of hardware is a database spread/installed?
              Depends again on the length of the string.
              4.who is an onsite DBA.
              Whoever is on-site and carries the DBA responsibility.
              5.what does a dba interact with the developers and testers.
              Depends again on the length of the string.
              6.what are the different database environments ( i just know two Production, Testing)?
              Depends on the shop and SDLC. There can be Q&A, R&D, user training, support, pre-production and numerous other variations.
              7. Difference between a development DBA and a production DBA.
              Spelled differently. These are just convenient names - it does not indicate the roles, responsibilities, accountability and authority that goes with the job title.
              • 4. Re: database bussiness flow.
                EdStevens
                kantamani wrote:
                hi sb92075,
                i learned sql and plsql, i did my certifications. Had been studying Oracle Architecture for a while. I am just a fresher looking for a job more interested in being a DBA rather than a plsql developer. so i would be glad
                if you could help rather being sarcastic . Thanks for your prompt replay.
                In spite of your objections, I have to echo SB's question. If you don't know what a DBA does, how do you know that's what you want to do? There is nothing worse than getting to the top of the ladder just to find it was leaning against the wrong building. I would advise some deep introspection on WHY you think you want a job when you haven't a clue what that job entails.

                You say you "learned sql and plsql" and have "been studying Oracle Architecture for a while". What actual work experience do you have? DBA is absolutely not an entry level job. Get a few years actual work experience as a developer before you even consider looking for a DBA job.


                As for point 7: "Difference between a development DBA and a production DBA."

                "When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean -- neither more nor less."
                (Lewis Carroll - Through the Looking Glass)

                And so it is with job titles. Any given job title means only and exactly what the organization chooses it to mean -- neither more nor less.".

                Even though we work in a technical industry, not every term you see has a universal, fixed, immutable, technical meaning.

                My first two jobs in IT were in shops that had exactly the same set of job titles for Programmers --
                - Programmer/Analyst I
                - Programmer/Analyst II
                - Programmer/Analyst III

                In the first shop, the Programmer/Analyst I was the most junior of the three.
                In the second shop, - Programmer/Analyst I was the most senior of the three.
                • 5. Re: database bussiness flow.
                  937454
                  I am just a fresher looking for a job more interested in being a DBA rather than a plsql developer.
                  2 years back, I had same q's that you do now, when I just got out of school.
                  As EdStevens suggested
                  Get a few years actual work experience as a developer before you even consider looking for a DBA job.
                  Thats what I am doing right now. I would say, that is a very good way to start from my experience.
                  • 6. Re: database bussiness flow.
                    jgarry
                    >
                    7. Difference between a development DBA and a production DBA.
                    In some places, a development DBA is one who can advise developers on tools and techniques - in other words, a super-developer - while a production DBA is one who manages production databases, including acting as a guardian controlling what and how new development is propagated to production. This kind of split is usually seen in large shops with ongoing development.

                    As the others noted, this kind of definition is site-dependent. I go even further to say, many job descriptions are actually quite far off from the actual work. I was doing DBA work long before I was ever called a DBA, and now I'm called a DBA/Programmer and most of my work is not DBA.. Oftentimes, job descriptions have everything thrown in them, with the hope of finding someone with at least some of the experience, or even to give the option of rejecting prospects arbitrarily. Job descriptions are categorizations necessary for human resources, not really for doing actual work.

                    So, you can have goals, and you can objectively evaluate your own strengths and weaknesses (even though most people are worse at that then they think). With respect to wanting to be a DBA, the practical advice usually boils down to: get a development job, and see where it takes you and what parts you like. DBA work is always some distance ahead of what the educational tracks for DBA are, so you are hired for particular skills - and there's usually 10x the demand for developers - but you advance based on what you can actually do. It helps to love new stuff so much you do it regardless of whether they pay you, and if you are motivated technically in a group, you wind up being the "goto" guy. There's a lot of boring work to do, so it helps to tolerate that, too. That's what coffee is for.
                    • 7. Re: database bussiness flow.
                      jgarry
                      >
                      There is nothing worse than getting to the top of the ladder just to find it was leaning against the wrong building.
                      How about falling off the ladder, climbing another ladder, crashing and burning off that one, then discovering the first one was the right building after all. :p

                      (Seen young 'uns do that far too often)