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8 Replies Latest reply: Mar 7, 2013 11:25 PM by Christian Erlinger RSS

How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?

995422 Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
Hi Experts, I am very new to Oracle Forms and PL/SQL. I have been doing development in Forms (mostly in 10g but I also in 6i) and PL/SQL for little over 2 years.

My problem is, I don't know much about how to progress up the ladder to be an Oracle Forms & PL/SQL expert.

My other big problem is trying to find out how to keep pace with the latest development in Forms and PL/SQL.

For example, my manager asked me how to print a file in a client printer. I could not give him a solution at once. Only after couple of hours of searching did I find the solution using WebUtil.

Another instance a manger asked me how to encrypt data in Oracle forms. Again I had to do an extensive search on the web.

Can an "expert" give a solution at once, without going to the web?

Another time I was asked to do a performance tuning and could not do it since I have not done before. I tried to follow the method found in this site using a personal DB in my machine but could not simulate a situation.

How do you keep track of latest developments?

Are their any sites to go to?

Is there a routine you can follow?

Do you have to do R&D regularly? How often?

How many hours of reading web-sites (on Forms, PL/SQL stuff) should you do for a week?

How do YOU experts do it?

You advice would be greatly appreciated.
  • 1. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    :) Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    it comes with experience not by reading or copying from others
  • 2. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    Atawneh Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    yes but u should have SQL skills and PL-Sqal skills
  • 3. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    HamidHelal Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    992419 wrote:
    Hi Experts, I am very new to Oracle Forms and PL/SQL. I have been doing development in Forms (mostly in 10g but I also in 6i) and PL/SQL for little over 2 years.

    My problem is, I don't know much about how to progress up the ladder to be an Oracle Forms & PL/SQL expert.

    My other big problem is trying to find out how to keep pace with the latest development in Forms and PL/SQL.
    Read and practice and keep track of your practice in a file for your need.
    For example, my manager asked me how to print a file in a client printer. I could not give him a solution at once. Only after couple of hours of searching did I find the solution using WebUtil.

    Another instance a manger asked me how to encrypt data in Oracle forms. Again I had to do an extensive search on the web.

    Can an "expert" give a solution at once, without going to the web?
    Not really that. If someone follow my first advice.. and he/she needs any topic common in his practice, it's easy to give answer and solution. But if you don't know exactly, you can post here, search on the web.

    get solution and keep track.
    Another time I was asked to do a performance tuning and could not do it since I have not done before. I tried to follow the method found in this site using a personal DB in my machine but could not simulate a situation.

    How do you keep track of latest developments?

    Are their any sites to go to?

    Is there a routine you can follow?

    Do you have to do R&D regularly? How often?
    I read this forum answered problem and solution and if i think important i keep track in my file.
    How many hours of reading web-sites (on Forms, PL/SQL stuff) should you do for a week?
    base on free time.
    How do YOU experts do it?
    One more thing, you know how to drive a car by reading books/manual. But you didn't drive not a single day ? Are you expert driver ?
    Answer is NO.

    Practice makes a man expert.

    May manage a blog of your important topic help yourself any where .


    Hope this helps

    Hamid :)


    Mark correct/helpful to help others to get right answer(s).*
  • 4. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    Christian Erlinger Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    First of all I don't consider myself an expert, so my advice here might be flawed as they are based on my experiences ;)
    Can an "expert" give a solution at once, without going to the web?
    Frankly I hardly know how to write a file using text_io or utl_file, or use some other somewhat regular-use supplied packages without looking them up in the documentation. Well I somehow know, but the code will most certainly throw compile errors. This is due to the fact that the entire oracle documentation is huge, and there are version dependend manuals, and I never liked memorizing things I could easily look up. It just doesn't make sense to memorize entire documentations when you can look them up. So even for basics I go to the web...
    For example, my manager asked me how to print a file in a client printer. I could not give him a solution at once. Only after couple of hours of searching did I find the solution using WebUtil.
    So in the end you found a solution yourself didn't you?
    Another instance a manger asked me how to encrypt data in Oracle forms. Again I had to do an extensive search on the web.
    I am around forms a few years, and I don't know an ad-hoc answer to that. I might have a clue, but for a advice I'd have to try and most certainly consult google.
    Another time I was asked to do a performance tuning and could not do it since I have not done before. I tried to follow the method found in this site using a personal DB in my machine but could not simulate a situation.
    And you know at least where to start now even if you didn't solve the problem, don't you?

    When I started programming C/C++ in school we had a teacher who I consider a C-Guru. Sometimes the answer to how would I implement X? was I don't know exactly yet, but let me do some research and I'll show you. Needless to say that we certainly got our answers. The same guy taught Java with the opening phrase I don't know much about Java, but it is Object-Oriented, the Syntax is C like,and the documentation is quite extensive. He explained things better to us then others who asserted knowing Java.

    IMHO curiosity and being keen to experiment are much more valuable then the ability to memorize manuals and APIs. You might solve your problems with your actual knowledge today, but tomorrow there are new challenges which require new knowledge to be accumulated.

    If you face a problem don't hesitate to get your hands dirty. If a program doesn't do what it's supposed to do fire up the debugger, look at diagnostic infos and see why it fails instead crying about that you don't know why. If you need to learn a new language install the compiler, and write code until it compiles and does what you want it to do. If you need to work with the new asdf server enterprise edition install it, turn it upside down, blow it's config into pieces until it stops working and maybe get it running after that.

    Everything else boils down to showing an active interest in the things you do. There is no formula saying "spend X hours a week on asktom and eventually become a database expert". I regularly (can't say how often) visit asktom because I like reading the questions there. I don't do it because I must or want to become an expert someday, it is simple curiosity.
    As for places to look this is answered easily: the key source for informations on new products is the vendors homepage. It's OTN for oracle, MSDN for microsoft, ubuntu.com for ubuntu, and what ever else. Technical articles etc. about the products are at least listed there.

    Of course in software development there is (at least) one rule which always applies:
    always write code as if the person who will maintain your code is a maniac serial killer that knows where you live

    cheers
  • 5. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    O.Developer Journeyer
    Currently Being Moderated
    It is good advice to every one
  • 6. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    995422 Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Thank you all for the replies. Appreciate it.

    I am really interested in getting into performance tuning. I was assigned a performance tuning task. However, we had no access to the live DB which had the actual problem. So, I tried got the table structures and put data and try to simulate the situation in a DB in my machine, but couldn't. How the best way to learn performance tuning. Are there any tools to generate data to simulate real situations. This is because, we don't get tuning requests very often.
  • 7. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    user346369 Expert
    Currently Being Moderated
    992419 wrote:
    Thank you all for the replies. Appreciate it.

    I am really interested in getting into performance tuning.
    Well, describe the problem, maybe someone here will recognize a situation and be able to help you out.

    Being an expert doesn't mean you know everything. It is more that you know where to go to find the solutions.
  • 8. Re: How to be a Forms & PL/SQL Expert?
    Christian Erlinger Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    I was assigned a performance tuning task. However, we had no access to the live DB which had the actual problem. So, I tried got the table structures and put data and try to simulate the situation in a DB in my machine, but couldn't.
    If they don't give you access to the live system then they might be willing to give you trace files and query plans of bad performing SQL statements? If you can identify the bad performing SQL Statements you could request a SQL Testcase using dbms_sqldiag which bascially analyzes the dependend objects of your query and exports them via datapump. You then could go ahead, import it in another database and see if you can tune your querys.

    see here on infos for dbms_sqldiag
    http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/appdev.112/e25788/d_sqldiag.htm#ARPLS68285
    for infos on dbms_sqldiag

    and here
    http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e10822/toc.htm
    would be the start in the documentation ;)

    cheers

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