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7 Replies Latest reply: Apr 14, 2013 11:37 AM by Dude! RSS

Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box

asmirnov Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
Hi,

I just got a new Lenovo 430s with Win7 64bit, this came by default with GPT partition type (UEFI mode)
Now having been always with dual boot Win/Linux I tried OL5.8 just to find out that it can't boot from GPT partition.
I looked around on this forum just to find a few posts of type 'go for the higher version' in order to be able to install into GPT but I can't find the information as to what release if any of unbreakable Linux does support GPT without need to use any tweaks.
Would appreciate much if someone would point me in the right direction.
I have a Win7 CD which does allow me to have Win7 with MBR and install OL5.8 without issues, my HD is not over 2TB, but I thought I may as well go with GPT.

This post here
error with dual boot Win 8/OL6 R3

suggests to
1. I would disable Secure Boot and enable SCM (BIOS emulation) in firmware.
2. Insert Linux install media (CD/DVD) and reboot.
3. Select UEFI CD/DVD boot option.

but with OL5.8 I didn't notice the UEFI boot option unless I missed something.

If anybody would care to comment would be great.

Thank you

Anatoliy
  • 1. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    I cannot speak for your hardware, but all Enterprise Linux distributions are designed for server grade hardware and have only limited support for desktop and laptop hardware. Why do you want to bother with dual-boot and not use Type 2 virtualization, such as free Oracle VM VirtualBox? You can have your Oracle Linux up and running in 10 min. without having to jeopardize your system or trying to find drivers for unsupported hardware.
  • 2. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    asmirnov Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dude,

    Thanks for your response.
    Regarding unsupported hardware I don't have any concerns with that - Lenovo T430 is well known to support different Linux distributions out there.

    I tried OL 5.8 which did bless me with

    "Your boot partition is on a disk using the GPT partitioning scheme but this machine cannot boot using GPT"

    Once I changed GPT with MBR on HD I have no such problem.

    Not sure if you by chance forgot to mention the answer to my question which was - what is the Linux rollout which does support GPT partition?

    Thank you again.

    Anatoliy
  • 3. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    Regarding unsupported hardware I don't have any concerns with that - Lenovo T430 is well known to support different Linux distributions out there.
    You may not be concerned about your hardware, but you are already experiencing a compatibility issue. Perhaps your laptop will support Ubuntu and Fedora, and perhaps RHEL 6, but I doubt it will run with the Oracle Linux UEK kernel.

    Check http://www.linlap.com/lenovo_thinkpad_t430.
    Not sure if you by chance forgot to mention the answer to my question which was - what is the Linux rollout which does support GPT partition?
    I was only trying to save you from running into a brick wall, assuming you are not a master of Linux Kung Fu. ;-)
    Can you explain why want dual-boot and not VirtualBox?

    As far as I'm aware, UEFI/GTP support for x64 systems was added starting with RHEL6 and the Grub bootloader of RHEL5 or OL5 does not support GTP. But perhaps you find other information or someone else knows better.

    Regarding UEFI/GTP support under RHEL6 and OL6, check the installation guide at:
    https://linux.oracle.com/documentation/
    E.2.2. GRUB and the boot process on UEFI-based x86 systems
  • 4. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    asmirnov Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Thanks, man, now you are talking :)

    No, I am an par with Kung Fu, even Djiu Djitsu ), though I used to always come up with my own kernel...

    Why not VM? Because I got myself a good laptop at last!

    On a serious - if I am not online the VM won't do no good, correct?

    Why do I keep Linux on a laptop (except for obvious reason of being able to work) - for one it NEVER showed me the back side (or do we call it a blue screen?) not like windows. So I always had FAT partition which I could ALWAYS access from within Linux, for a long time already even that (FAT) was not needed with NTFS drivers, don't need no backups this way :)

    But I guess you have a point with VM, I am just not there yet.

    Thank you,

    Anatoliy

    Edited by: asmirnov on Apr 12, 2013 10:53 AM
  • 5. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    EdStevens Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    asmirnov wrote:
    Thanks, man, now you are talking :)

    No, I am an par with Kung Fu, even Djiu Djitsu ), though I used to always come up with my own kernel...

    Why not VM? Because I got myself a good laptop at last!

    On a serious - if I am not online the VM won't do no good, correct?
    <snip>

    Not correct. (I guess it depends on what you mean by "not online") It's all a matter of how you configure the networking for the vm.

    When you install the virutalization produc (Virtual Box or VMware) it will create a virtual network adapter on the host os. You can see it ... and its IP address ... with the windows 'ipconfig' command (or 'ifconfig' if your host happened to be linux). I'm not a net guru, but tend to think of that adapter as being the router for my virtual network.

    And except for the yum access (which is usually not needed after initial setup) I can do this whether the host is 'online' or not.

    When you create a virtual machine (even before you actually load an os on it), you specify one or more NICs (virtual NICs). Each can be specified as either 'NAT', 'Bridged', or 'Hostonly'. VBox and VMware implement these slightly differently.

    When I build a vm (and I currently have 6 on my Win7 desktop) I have three prime directives:
    1) the vm must be able to reach the internet to be able to download packages from a yum server
    2) the vm must be invisible to my network admins
    3) my desktop must be able to communicate with the vm exactly as if it were a physical server in my data center.

    I achieve all three of those. Details at [url http://edstevensdba.wordpress.com/category/personal-test-systems/]configure the Virtual Box Network

    Except for the yum access I can use my vm's irregardless of whether or not my desktop is on-line. The only networking between the host and the vm's occurs through that virtual adapter.

    Edited by: EdStevens on Apr 12, 2013 1:24 PM

    Edited by: EdStevens on Apr 12, 2013 1:25 PM
  • 6. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    asmirnov Newbie
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nice write up, thanks for sharing.
    Always good to hear what other people say!

    I guess I need to think more about what you said as far as VM goes.
    By the way - how much RAM does it take?

    The reason I am asking is that just until recently I only had 4G RAM running either XP or OE Linux 5.4 (same laptop) and I needed to have both WebLogic, JDerveloper and the db server on my lap and run them at the same time, my work as a consultant can take me anywhere... Those 3 almost took the laptop down no matter how big the SGA was or how intensive the web logic domain was. So to me a VMware though very useful (and I mean it since I listen to what other people say) is yet another program/process taking some memory. I will probably agree more back 12 years ago when hardware compatibility issues even with the simple frame buffer support in Linux or what ever it was called did require kernel tweaks but now days it is somewhat different.

    Regards
    A
  • 7. Re: Oracle Linux distro to support GPT out of the box
    Dude! Guru
    Currently Being Moderated
    VirtualBox as such does not use any substantial RAM. It uses hardware assisted virtualization technologies for memory, CPU and and I/O. Since it is a Type 2 hypervisor you will however need enough RAM to support your guest OS (Linux and database) and the primary host system (Windows). 4 GB is about the minimum, 8 GB and more may do for your installation purpose.

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