3 Replies Latest reply: Apr 29, 2013 1:28 PM by KonradZuse RSS

    Should a "newbie" Java programmer learn FX over SE to start with?

    KonradZuse
      I'm curious if anyone should learn FX before or instead of SE? I know that you need libraries from SE, but since I have probably 6 months of FX under my belt that it's really different from SE, so I'm not sure what they should learn?

      IT seems to be that FX is mostly GUI so if you DO NOT need GUI work you might end up going the SE route?


      I personally think it all should be learned. There are specific cases you will learn new things when you need it, so the time to use any API whether it's FX, SE, or EE can be varied. I think FX should be used over swing when someone needs GUI work. I used to like swing, but now I think it was such a pain, and don't think anyone should use it.. FX imo is much easier to use and work with, plus it's much much more powerful in terms of what it does.



      Thoughts?
        • 1. Re: Should a "newbie" Java programmer learn FX over SE to start with?
          James_D
          I'm not sure your question really makes sense. JavaFX is a framework for UI development built on top of Java SE; and as of Java 8 it will be a part of the Java core libraries. To write a UI application using JavaFX you necessarily use Java SE (by which I mean the language and commonly-used core libraries, such as collections and io).
          • 2. Re: Should a "newbie" Java programmer learn FX over SE to start with?
            gimbal2
            James_D wrote:
            I'm not sure your question really makes sense. JavaFX is a framework for UI development built on top of Java SE; and as of Java 8 it will be a part of the Java core libraries. To write a UI application using JavaFX you necessarily use Java SE (by which I mean the language and commonly-used core libraries, such as collections and io).
            In other words: JavaFX is a small part of JavaSE, it is not something separate. You still use standard Java classes to build your applications. You'd still use the collections API, the concurrency API, the IO interfaces, the number and date formatting classes; heck under water JavaFX itself uses old fashioned AWT classes to do for example imaging work.

            If you build any kind of application that actually does something other than be a JavaFX GUI demo, you're in JavaSE territory.
            • 3. Re: Should a "newbie" Java programmer learn FX over Swing to start with?
              KonradZuse
              That's what I figured, I wasn't sure if FX was JUST GUI. So I should change my question to should one use FX over Swing?