7 Replies Latest reply: Jul 11, 2013 1:24 PM by J Peters-Oracle RSS

    Import VirtualBox Image into OVM

    asglasspole

      Hi,

       

      We're running an OVM 3.2.2 environment and a colleague of mine has requested that I import an OBIEE VirtualBox image from the below site into OVM:

       

      http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/bi-foundation/obiee-samples-167534.html

       

      Is it possible to do this? - I've tried importing the .vmdk virtual disk and the .ovf assembly, then created a template from it, but the resulting VM doesn't work because it can't read from the disk.

       

      If this isn't possible, does anyone know of another way to import it into OVM, or are there any equivalent OBIEE OVM templates.

       

      Regards,
      Andy

        • 1. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
          asglasspole

          In case anyone else wants to know, I managed to get this working by doing the following:

           

          1. Imported the ovf file as an assembly, which also automatically imported the vmdk file.
          2. Created a template from the assembly, which converts the .vmdk to an .img file - the 20G vmdk grew to a 250G img file
          3. Create a VM from the template
          4. I manually mounted the VM’s .img file on the OVM server and got access to the /boot/grub/grub.conf.  I then changed the default kernel – there appears to be an issue with using UEK kernels with HVM VMs
          5. The VM then started OK

           

          Andy

          • 2. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
            WadhahDaouehi

            Hi,

             

            To import your VirtualBox image into OVM, you should create an ova image via VirtualBox and import this image like an assembly with Oracle VM Manager, and dont import the file.vmdk, i will explain:

             

            First Solution:

            - Poweroff your VM that you want to import (in this case your OBIEE)

            - Go to;  file -> export Appliance (then choose your VM); Then Next (choose  a location and a name for your VM).

            The location should be in the directory of the Web Server (to be accessible via http:// ) or FTP directory (to be accessible via ftp://)

            - Go to Oracle Manager -> Repositories -> Select your Repository -> Assemblies

            - click Import; and give the url where the appliance located

                 example:

                      location: /var/www/html/OBIEE.ova

                      Import URM: http://IP-ADDRESS/OBIEE.ova

            When the server finish.

            - Go to; Assemblies -> click Create VM Template

            - Go to; Server and VMs; Create VM from Templates

            Then enjoy your self

             

            Second Solution:

            You can download an Oracle VM Template for for Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition, in this URL.

            and sing in; select your architecture X86 (64 or 32 bits) and DownLoad.

            - unzip the Template

            - Go to Oracle Manager -> Repositories -> Select your Repository -> Templatres

            - click Import; and give the url where the Template located

                 example:

                      location: /var/www/html/OBIEE.tgz

                      Import URM: http://IP-ADDRESS/OBIEE.tgz

            When the server finish.

            - Go to; Server and VMs; Create VM from Templates.

            Then enjoy your self

             

            I hoep this can help you

            Best Regards

            • 3. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
              asglasspole

              Thanks for your response, and I was aware that you can export an ova image via VirtualBox but I didn't have the image in VirtualBox and wanted to avoid importing it in to VirtualBox, then exporting out.  Also, I presume exporting it as an ova wouldn't change the kernel issue that I was having.

               

              OVM did actually import and convert the ovf/vmdk files ok, but it wouldn't start the HVM VM until I changed the kernel - this forum post suggests that there is an issue with UEK kernels and HVM VMs - OVM 3.0.3 import VirtualBox OVM Manager 3.0.3 OVA template

               

              I think OVM might use vbox-img to convert the vmdk to a RAW .img file, and I'm guessing Vbox will do something very similar to create the ova.

               

              Regards,
              Andy

              • 4. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
                asglasspole

                Actually, I've just tried importing the image into VBox and then exporting it as an ova file, and the ova file just contains the vmdk and ovf file (there might be other files, I didn't check), which means when I import it into OVM as an assembly, OVM will still convert the vmdk to a RAW img in the same way.  So I think that my method of importing the ovf file directly, which in turn imports the vmdk, would create exactly the same result.

                 

                I might try importing the ova file into OVM just out of interest to see if the result would be any different - depends if I can be bothered transferring 20G across the network

                 

                Andy

                • 5. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
                  J Peters-Oracle

                  OVM 3.0.3 import VirtualBox OVM Manager 3.0.3 OVA template, https://forums.oracle.com/thread/2372114

                  • 6. Re: Import VirtualBox Image into OVM
                    J Peters-Oracle

                    The issues with HVM and UEK relate to implementation of PVOPS, which is a good thing.


                    With OL6u1+ I have found conversion from HVM to PV painless.


                    "Conversion OL6u1 HVM to PV", https://forums.oracle.com/thread/2457909


                    FYI OVM Manager 3.1.1 can do the HVM to PV conversion for OL6u1+ without any grief. Create VM using HVM then update the

                    VM "Domain Type" to be "Xen PVM".


                    A current marked up "vm.cfg".


                    # (H)ardware (V)irtual (M)achine configuration

                    #

                    # /etc/xen/xmexample.hvm

                    #

                    kernel = '/usr/lib/xen/boot/hvmloader'

                    builder = 'hvm'

                    memory = '4096'

                    device_model ='/usr/lib/xen/bin/qemu-dm'

                     

                    # The number of cpus guest platform has, default=1

                    #vcpus=1

                     

                    # PXE boot

                    #bootloader = '/usr/bin/pypxeboot'

                    #bootloader = '/usr/bin/pygrub'

                     

                     

                    # Virtual block device configuration using disk image file:

                    #

                    # dd if=/dev/zero of=/$VM_PATH/$VM_NAME/System.img bs=1M count=$MB

                    #

                    # or sparse disk image file if filesystem supported e.g. EXT3 and OCFS2 v1.4:

                    #

                    # dd if=/dev/null of=/$VM_PATH/$VM_NAME/System.img bs=1M seek=$MB

                    #

                    # disk = [ 'file:/$VM_PATH/$VM_NAME/System.img,ioemu:hda,w', ]

                    #

                    # Configuration using physical disk logical volume:

                    #

                    # lvcreate --size ${GB}G --name $VM_NAME $VG_NAME

                    #

                    # disk = [ 'phy:/dev/$VG_NAME/$VM_NAME,xvda,w',]

                    #

                    # CDROM configuration using file:

                    #

                    # disk = [ 'file:/$BOOT_ISO_NAME,hdc:cdrom,r', ]

                     

                    disk = [ 'file:/OVS/OEL5u2-x86-boot.iso,hdc:cdrom,r', 'file:/OVS/vm1/System.img,ioemu:hda,w', ]

                     

                    # Domain name

                    name = "vm1"

                     

                    #

                    # Networking

                    #

                    # Network bridge status:

                    #

                    #   /etc/xen/scripts/network-bridge status

                    #

                    # 'bridge' should be proper interface e.g. xenbr0

                    #

                    # Reference OTN "OVM 2.2.1 OL6u1 HVM network interface and block device configuration",

                    #

                    # https://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?messageID=9983019

                    #

                    # vif = ['type=ioemu, bridge=xenbr0']

                    # vif = ['type=netfront, bridge=xenbr0']

                    vif = ['type=ioemu, bridge=xenbr0']

                     

                    #-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    # boot on floppy (a), hard disk (c), Network (n) or CD-ROM (d)

                    # default: hard disk, cd-rom, floppy

                    boot = "cd"

                     

                    #

                    # Enable HV VNC console

                    #

                    # Uses avaiablle next VNC port $OVM_SERVER_HOST:0 == 5900, :1 == 5901 etc

                    #

                    # Use "xm list -l" to determince VNC port "location"

                    #

                    vnc=1

                    vncunused=1

                    vnclisten="0.0.0.0"

                    vncpasswd=''

                     

                    sdl=0

                     

                    #

                    # Set the real time clock to local time [default=0 i.e. set to utc]

                    #

                    # Allows Win VM clock to work with UTC on OVM host system.

                    #

                    #localtime=1



                    I have also found that using "xend" to plumb the "bond0" bridge can be troublesome when starting the Manager on the OVM host.

                    "bond0" can be configured as a "bridge" by setting its role as "Virtual Machine".  I do not have proper explanation thus far for this

                    behaviour.


                    Cheers,

                    Jim