7 Replies Latest reply: Jun 12, 2014 3:12 PM by JustinCave RSS

    Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?

    2666407

      Oracle11g  has the capability of being embedded along with a

      software application by means of cloning. Can someone please

      comment how this approach is more efficient in terms of system

      resource usage (read CPU/RAM/Swap) as compared to a normal

      Oracle db installation ?

       

       

      Apparently it does not seem so.

        • 1. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
          JustinCave

          I'm not sure what "embedded along with a software application by means of cloning" means.  Can you provide a link to some documentation about exactly what feature you are talking about?

           

          You can certainly use RMAN (either directly or via OEM) to clone a database.  There would be no difference in the performance between a cloned database and another database with identical settings running an identical workload on identical hardware.  If you mean to refer to "cloning" in some other context, please help us out by telling us exactly what you're talking about.

           

          Justin

          • 2. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
            rp0428

            Oracle11g  has the capability of being embedded along with a

            software application by means of cloning.

            Sez who?

             

            Post a link to the source of that information.

            Apparently it does not seem so.

            And what does that mean exactly?

            • 4. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
              2666407

              Folks, I am referring to the solution offered here (as Bob rightly said):

              http://www.oracle.com/us/products/database/embeddable-databases/overview/index.html

               

              As per the URL above, Oracle12c db editions can be packaged along with a

              software solution and installed alongside the software application to co-reside

              on the same server.  The oracle db cloning mechanism is being proposed for this

              as per Oracle whitepaper as per these:

              http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/embedded/index.html

              http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/embedded-datasheet-166556.pdf

               

              Since standard editions of Oracle db have been known to be resource intensive.

              When we co-locate the Oracle db along with our java application on a medium

              configuration server(may be vm/physical) with say 8 Gig RAM, 4 CPU, 100 gig HDD,

              would you guys be apprehensive of such as approach ?

               

              As Justin rightly mentioned, cloned db or plain Oracle db installation, if Oracle db

              needs to use resources, we got to give it. Cloning may save us some time compared

              to a normal Oracle db install every time, but its not going to result in less system

              resources being used.

               

              I am aware that we now have Oracle11g XE 64-bit editions out and can consider this

              if I am so much concerned about memory/resource usage, but the intention is to efficiently

              utilize the available system resources (CPU cores/RAM) though usage of the correct Oracle

              db version/edition and not be limited with the inherent limits placed by XE editions.

              • 5. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
                EdStevens

                When we co-locate the Oracle db along with our java application on a medium

                configuration server(may be vm/physical) with say 8 Gig RAM, 4 CPU, 100 gig HDD,

                 

                Really?  My standard-issue company desktop has more horses than that.  Well, I have the same RAM and CPU, but 10x the disk.  Ok, I'll even grant that your statement of the amount of disk is a typo, because I can't even find a computer for sale with a disk that small.  But even then, what you describe is a pretty minimal consumer desktop machine.

                • 6. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
                  jgarry

                  Perhaps he is expecting to distribute an app to minimal consumer desktop machines or VM's.  If so, it would make sense to be worried about such performance differences.  But perhaps he should be more worried about the java side of it.

                  • 7. Re: Is embedding Oracle11g more resource efficient than normal installation ?
                    JustinCave

                    The oracle db cloning mechanism is being proposed for this as per Oracle whitepaper as per these:

                     

                    But nowhere on the pages you link to does the word "clone" or "cloning" appear.  Perhaps one of the whitepapers linked from one of those pages talks about cloning and that's what you're really talking about.  Maybe that whitepaper is talking about using RMAN to clone an existing database as part of an installation process.  Perhaps it's talking about something else-- words like "clone" have a habit of being used to mean very different things in different contexts which is why we tend to get antsy about ensuring that we understand exactly how you are using that term.

                     

                    Since standard editions of Oracle db have been known to be resource intensive.  When we co-locate the Oracle db along with our java application on a medium configuration server(may be vm/physical) with say 8 Gig RAM, 4 CPU, 100 gig HDD, would you guys be apprehensive of such as approach ?

                     

                    It depends.  But, realistically, this isn't something that we can answer for you, it's something that you'd need to answer for yourself based on your own testing.  8 GB of RAM isn't a whole lot if you're running an Oracle database, a Java app server, and a Java application.  Whether that is sufficient, however, is going to depend on your application, your workload, and your performance requirements.  If you're deploying an application that is used lightly by a couple dozen folks and your application is reasonably memory efficient, it's entirely possible that this will be more than sufficient.  If you're deploying an application that is going to be heavily used by thousands of users and your application is built by garden variety enterprise Java developers who aren't giving a lot of thought to memory efficiency, however, you're likely going to be in a world of hurt.

                     

                    From a licensing standpoint, the cheapest approach is generally to run Oracle on its own server because that allows you to license just the hardware your database needs rather than buying Oracle licenses for processors/ cores that are really running your Java application (or getting hit by user minimums based on hardware that you're not really going to be dedicating to Oracle).  If you're going to use an embedded license, make sure that you (and your customers) understand the additional development work that may entail because your application would have to implement things like running backups for the database rather than allowing your customers to access the database directly for backups or implement exports rather than allowing your customers to access the database directly for reporting or to replicate the data elsewhere.

                     

                    Justin