4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 7, 2016 4:53 PM by EdStevens

    Failed to install Oracle database on Linux 64 bit

    807674

      Hello,

      I am trying to install Oracle db on Debian GNU/Linux 8 (jessie) 64-bit. I used oracle-xe-11.2.0-1.0.x86_64.rpm.zip following steps under this link (skipping java part at its beginning):

      http://blog.whitehorses.nl/2014/03/18/installing-java-oracle-11g-r2-express-edition-and-sql-developer-on-ubuntu-64-bit/

       

      Now whenever I try to connect to database or launch sqlplus I get the following error every time

       

      I wonder why installing Oracle db engine on linux is such a nightmare while it is a piece of cake on windows?!

       

      PLS help.

       

      root@localhost:/home/superuser01# sqlplus

       

      SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Sun Aug 7 01:55:11 2016

       

      Copyright (c) 1982, 2011, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

       

      Enter user-name: hr

      Enter password:

      ERROR:

      ORA-01034: ORACLE not available

      ORA-27101: shared memory realm does not exist

      Linux-x86_64 Error: 2: No such file or directory

      Process ID: 0

      Session ID: 0 Serial number: 0

        • 1. Re: Failed to install Oracle database on Linux 64 bit
          Dude!

          You are installing Oracle Express Edition on an unsupported Linux distribution. If you would attempt to install Oracle database on an unsupported Windows edition, you'd run into trouble too. Unfortunately Debian Linux is not supported. https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E17781_01/install.112/e18802/toc.htm

           

          This does not mean you cannot install 11g XE, but the process will obviously not work OOTB. I wrote some how-to myself some years ago, but unless you're really forced to run XE in Debian, I recommend to use VirtualBox and install Oracle Linux instead. There are many advantages using virtualization, especially for the purpose of experimenting.

           

          Regarding your problem, it's an error that occurs if the database has not been started. This could mean the installation instructions you have been following are perhaps incorrect or out of date, or not meant for your current version of Debian Linux.

           

          I suggest to check C.5. "Setup Oracle environment variables" Install Oracle 11gR2 Express Edition on Ubuntu Linux 11.04 (64-bit) Howto, followed by:

           

          $ sqlplus / as sysdba

          $ SQL> startup

           

          If you continue have problems report back.

          • 2. Re: Failed to install Oracle database on Linux 64 bit
            Dude!

            And btw, I just noticed:

             

             

            root@localhost:/home/superuser01# sqlplus

             

             

            Oracle must not run as root or superuser. You should run sqlplus and start the database using the "oracle" account.

            • 3. Re: Failed to install Oracle database on Linux 64 bit
              807674

              Thanks so much for your valuable answer. No I am not forced to use Debian Linux, I will follow advised links & hence use a supported version of Linux.

              • 4. Re: Failed to install Oracle database on Linux 64 bit
                EdStevens

                807674 wrote:

                 

                Thanks so much for your valuable answer. No I am not forced to use Debian Linux, I will follow advised links & hence use a supported version of Linux.

                And while your are at it, lose the notion of using root to do things.  Dude! pointed it out for a specific, but I'll broaden that to a general principle.

                 

                Your statement "I wonder why installing Oracle db engine on linux is such a nightmare while it is a piece of cake on windows?!" seems to suggest you don't yet have much experience with Linux.  One thing you need to understand (apart from the fact that it is nothing like Windows (thankfully)) is that working as root is like "running with scissors" -- only more dangerous.  Good Linux systems administrators never log on as root unless they absolutely need that elevated privilege.  They do this precisely because they understand the power and the implicit responsibility.  The only time the Oracle dba needs to do anything as root is when prompted as such during an installation.  Most systems admins set their systems to prevent direct logon as root, instead requiring a logon with one's own account then 'su' to become root.

                 

                Bottom line - NEVER do anything as root that doesn't absolutely require that level of permission.