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Opportunities ?

843789
843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
Hi there, everybody.

I was wondering about the opportunities an SCJD exam will provide. I have no professional background as a programmer, but it is a longstanding devoted hobby of mine.
What i like to know is, how difficult or easy is it to get a job as a java programmer with only a certification and no professional background to show.
What else would be counted as experience? Would taking part in a SourceForge Project, be a plus point?

Any advice is welcome.

Thanks ilgo

Comments

  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    I'm in the same case as you, but i think having a certification from sun is always an asset than no having one (if you intend to word as a developper of course). But i think the Sun Certified Web Component Developer is more valuated because it looks like companies use Java mostly to develop web applications.
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    In that case, does everybody else use C/C++ for Software development?
    And if so are there any certifications that are equal in value as Sun's SCJD, for other Languages ?

    Regards ilgo
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    certificates may help you get past the first screening of your resume when applying for a job, but that's as far as it goes (except MAYBE for entry level jobs and internships, where you're not expected to know more than where the powerbutton is and what to do with it).

    There are certificates for other languages as well, mostly offered by educational institutes.
    Microsoft and IBM I think have certification programs that contain C++ parts, but those are of course devoted to their own products rather than common standards.
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    Well then i am back on square one.

    What else is one to do if one wishes to get a job as programmer, lacking professional background, and certifications are of not of much real use?
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    do like the rest of us, and start at the bottom of the pile instead of trying for a highend job from the beginning.
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    What else is one to do if one wishes to get a job as
    programmer, lacking professional background, and
    certifications are of not of much real use?
    If you have no professional programming experience and no professional experience, then here are 7 Steps to Opportunity.

    1. Study software design concepts, structured programming, object technology, HTTP / IP networking
    2. Study a programming language (e.g. Java or C++) deeply
    3. Learn the basics of a web-based scripting language such as JavaScript
    4. Take entry-level certification exam in whatever programming language you chose
    5. Create a few basic applications to possible demonstrate in an interview
    6. Look for technical associations in your local community and volunteer to help on community projects, visit local faith-based organizations
    7. Search local newspaper for entry-level programming jobs after completing steps 1 thru 6.
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    Well, thanks a lot

    that was a useful and practical reply. It really does answer my original question, and provides me with a sense of where i am heading to.

    Regards ilgo
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    You are most certainly welcome. Embarking on a clear career path is a challenging task and requires hard work and a disciplined approach to learning. Information technologies are always evolving and continuosly integrating with business models and strategies. One of my most steadfast recommendations for you would be to study business as well as technology. When you go to buy that new Java book, also take a look at the business section and find a book about leadership or marketing. Learn the differences between leadership and management as well as how to write a thread-safe Singleton. The integrating of this knowledge with a thorough understanding will make you a better candiate for that "programming" position. Learn what situational leadership is. Learn the techniques of conversational marketing, and also learn to continue learning. The Sun certifications do expire and software design is naturally an evolving field. There is a new programming language out there named Groovy. Do you know about Groovy? What makes Groovy so special and how is it different than C++ and Java?

    Good luck.
  • 843789
    843789 Member Posts: 46,655 Green Ribbon
    Java certification no longer expires (and hasn't for some years) but is versioned.

    Groovy is nothing special, it's just overhyped (much like Ruby).
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