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Which Database software is widely used to store data ? and Why ?

codiant
codiant Member Posts: 133 Blue Ribbon

Which Database software is widely used to store data ? and Why ?

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Best Answer

  • User_G2BGV
    User_G2BGV Member Posts: 17 Blue Ribbon
    Accepted Answer

    Hi Nihit,

    There is no particular DB for data storage. Any db can store data .. and transactions. But now we are in could environment. Ofcourse Oracle also support could env. Structured data .. means .. relationship data with one or more tables / views / Oracle is better. Otherwise Big data is Ok. This is my opinion and presume.

    BR

    Frd

Answers

  • EdStevens
    EdStevens Member Posts: 28,462 Gold Crown

    Oracle, MS SQL Server, IBM DB2, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and others are all "widely used". As for "why", because they work, they seem to meet the user's needs.

    Do you have a more specific question?

    Judging by your posting history, you appear to be on some sort of career quest

  • S567
    S567 Member Posts: 417 Red Ribbon

    As Ed said we have many DB's to store data but it depends what kind of data you are storing structured or Un Structured.

    There are few databases which do not support un structured like RDBMS.

  • User_G2BGV
    User_G2BGV Member Posts: 17 Blue Ribbon
    Accepted Answer

    Hi Nihit,

    There is no particular DB for data storage. Any db can store data .. and transactions. But now we are in could environment. Ofcourse Oracle also support could env. Structured data .. means .. relationship data with one or more tables / views / Oracle is better. Otherwise Big data is Ok. This is my opinion and presume.

    BR

    Frd

  • S567
    S567 Member Posts: 417 Red Ribbon

    These days I hear No-SQL databases are also playing wide role in terms of storing relation and non relational data.Like MongoDB, Cassandra.

    DO you know any openforum which is very active on NO-SQL Database (MONgo or Cassandra).

  • EdStevens
    EdStevens Member Posts: 28,462 Gold Crown

    These days I hear No-SQL databases are also playing wide role in terms of storing relation and non relational data.Like MongoDB, Cassandra.

    Well, I never claimed that the products I listed were the only ones.


    DO you know any openforum which is very active on NO-SQL Database (MONgo or Cassandra).

    I don't deal with those products, so - no, I do not know. Why don't you just google 'no-sql user forum' or 'mongo user forum' or 'cassandra user forum'. That's what I do . . .

  • GregV
    GregV Member Posts: 3,062 Gold Crown

    MongoDB and Cassandra have a different purpose than Oracle. I'm not an expert on these but they are meant to retrieve data very quickly, and you just mostly insert data in these DB. Why are they fast? Because unlike Oracle RDBMS they duplicate the data to serve the different ways you want to retrieve it. So duplicating data for these is not shocking, on the contrary. In a way it's like "cheating" because they already know the queries in advance. You want to know the movies by genre? So let's store the movie data by genre. You want to know the movies by director? Let's also store the movie data by director. In Oracle RDBMS you would join movies to the genre table, or to the director table accordingly.

    In a previous company we were considering using Cassandra. That time the documentation on the Apache website was very light (with lots of TODOs !). You'll probably have trouble finding help for Cassandra than for Oracle. Same with staff. Not so easy to find people with expertise on Cassandra, at least in my area. Or you hire a freelance that will cost you a lot.