9 Replies Latest reply: Sep 19, 2010 12:39 AM by 843793 RSS

    Practical Java RMI applications

    843793
      i would like to know of any applications which are more or less real world application developed using Java (or any other distributed technology)

      most of the applications that i come across are examples for novices who start programing on RMI and are centered around either a simple client server program (e.g distributed task bag application)

      what i am referring here as practical is the application logic of the application i.e. the distribution aspect of it and how it is solved using RMI or any other distributed technology

      it would be nice if you could send me links/pdfs of such practical applications.
        • 1. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
          EJP
          Every J2EE application ever written.
          • 2. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
            843793
            If I might suggest; please have a look at the [cajo SDK|https://cajo.dev.java.net/sdk.html].

            It demonstrates with very little code, quite a bit of the capabilities of RMI.

            John
            • 3. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
              843793
              ejp wrote:
              Every J2EE application ever written.
              So you are saying that a WebService application using Spring and accessing the database through Hibernate is not a Java EE application.
              • 4. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                EJP
                I usuallly find when people ask me or tell me what I am saying that they are just introducing red herrings. Usually the answer is just 'no'. A J2EE application is distinguished by its use of J2EE containers and EJBs. What you are talking about would run under Tomcat as far as I can see, so it isn't a J2EE application.

                What this has to do with the OP's question is anybody's guess.
                • 5. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                  843793
                  A J2EE application is distinguished by its use of J2EE containers and EJBs. What you are talking about would run under Tomcat as far as I can see, so it isn't a J2EE application.
                  So I would like to see the original definition of a Java EE applicaiton which says that it (the application) has to use EJB in order to be called a Java EE application.
                  You probably know [Sun's J2EE tutorial|http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E17802_01/j2ee/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial-update2/doc/index.html], it covers many more topics than just EJB, so you are not right saying the applicaiton has to use EJB to be called a J2EE app.

                  BTW. I asked about this, because your first anwer was basically wrong and would confuse the OP.

                  Edited by: AdamDyga on Sep 21, 2010 10:59 AM
                  • 6. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                    EJP
                    So I would like to see the original definition of a Java EE applicaiton which says that it (the application) has to use EJB in order to be called a Java EE application.
                    A J2EE application has to have something that distinguishes it from a Java SE application. An application that can run in Tomcat is a Java SE application. Ergo it is not a JavaEE application. Pretty simple really.
                    it covers many more topics than just EJB
                    Right at the start it says:
                    >
                    The difference between J2EE components and "standard" Java classes is that J2EE components are assembled into a J2EE application, are verified to be well formed and in compliance with the J2EE specification, and are deployed to production, where they are run and managed by the J2EE server.
                    >
                    A J2EE application is deployed as a .ear file. A .war file is not a J2EE application. J2SE components are not 'verified to be well formed and in compliance with the J2EE specification'. Tomcat is not a J2EE server. QED.
                    you are not right saying the applicaiton has to use EJB to be called a J2EE app.
                    I didn't say it. I decline to discuss statements I haven't made, put forward by people who haven't read what I wrote.
                    your first anwer was basically wrong and would confuse the OP
                    We can all be wrong; we're computer programmers, and we are wrong several times a day. But you haven't shown how it is wrong yet.

                    And it is still irrelevant to the OP's question.
                    • 7. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                      843793
                      ejp wrote:
                      An application that can run in Tomcat is a Java SE application.
                      This discussion is becoming ridiculous. You are saying that JSP/JSF/etc specs are not part of [Java EE technologies|http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/index-jsp-142185.html]. I think you should send an email to Oracle so they can fix their terrible mistake and move the JSP-related specs to [Java SE list of technologies|http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/index.html].
                      • 8. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                        843793
                        you are not right saying the applicaiton has to use EJB to be called a J2EE app.
                        I didn't say it.
                        yes, you did:
                        A J2EE application is distinguished by its use of J2EE containers and EJBs
                        • 9. Re: Practical Java RMI applications
                          EJP
                          My statement and your mis-statement of it are not equivalent. As I said before I will not defend statements I haven't made put forward by people who haven't read waht I did write.