5 Replies Latest reply on May 8, 2003 4:53 PM by 843811

    The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java

    843811
      Hi,
      Can I use the term "Daemon Process" in Java or is there something we should not use the term in java and is specific to some other technology/os..????



        • 1. Re: The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java
          843811
          "Daemon Process" is a notion in UNIX denoting a process detached from any controlling terminal, typically waiting for some event to occur and to respond to in some way. Windows services are similar but I assume Bil et alia chose deliberately a different word for them. Does this answer your question?
          • 2. Re: The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java
            843811
            can we use it or not..???coz in my design documentation I have mentioned as daemon process which consumes jms message but been restricted to use the term daemon process saying that it no way belong to java and it is specific to unix.

            but in common sense daemon is the generic term any process which runs through lifetime of an application can be said to be daemon process and what is the restriction of using the common terminology...?????? and why do you look narrow with respect to UNIX...???
            • 3. Re: The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java
              jschellSomeoneStoleMyAlias
              can we use it or not..???coz in my design
              documentation I have mentioned as daemon process which
              consumes jms message but been restricted to use the
              term daemon process saying that it no way belong to
              java and it is specific to unix.
              First sounds like some confusion on your co-workers part (or you didn't relay the entire conversation.)

              The Thread class in java has the setDaemon() method. So java certainly has something called 'daemon'.
              but in common sense daemon is the generic term any
              process which runs through lifetime of an application
              can be said to be daemon process and what is the
              restriction of using the common terminology...??????
              and why do you look narrow with respect to UNIX...???
              Even though it exists in java doesn't mean that you are referring to it correctly. It isn't even clear that you need to refer to it.

              Maybe you have a process that runs when the server starts up. In your documention you might generically refer to this (using the phrase I used) and then specifically say "for example a 'service' on a Windows OS".

              If, on the other hand, you are specifically referring to a thread and not a process, then there are two possible explainations.
              1. You really do have a daemon thread and someone else doesn't know what they are talking about.
              2. You don't have a daemon thread, but merely have a regular thread. A daemon thread is typically going to be one that does somethig independent of other threads and entirely in the background. Thus a GUI thread is not a daemon thread. Nor is a socket handler thread. But the garbage collector thread is a daemon.
              • 4. Re: The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java
                843811
                What about writing "background process" provided the documentation is not on a technical level.

                • 5. Re: The use of the term "Daemon Process" in java
                  843811
                  Can I use the term "Daemon Process" in Java or is
                  is there something we should not use the term in java
                  and is specific to some other technology/os..????
                  Why would not or could not you use the term? Thread and Process are still implemented very similarly on `some' modern OSs.

                  As per the other posts, what's wrong with Daemon Thread instead of Daemon Process? if in fact you have a Thread.setDaemon(true) that can be VERY loosely considered as one that detaches itself from the JVM `terminal,' one that will die when the JVM dies.

                  --
                  jensenje