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1 Reply Latest reply: Oct 28, 2010 9:25 AM by Steve_Clamage RSS

Support for C++0x in Sun Studio

807857 Newbie
Currently Being Moderated
Hello,
Can someone help by updating on what is the status on SunStudio support for C++0x. Back in May 2008, Steve Clamage - Sun C++ Team, confirmed it'll be ready in time.

http://forums.sun.com/thread.jspa?threadID=5296590

gcc 4.5.1 seems to support:
http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/manual/status.html#status.iso.200x
Support for raw strings, lambda expressions and explicit type conversion operators.

Runtime Library (libstdc++)
Support for <future>, <functional>, and <random>
Existing facilities now exploit explicit operators and the newly implemented core C++0x features

Regards,
Sumit
  • 1. Re: Support for C++0x in Sun Studio
    Steve_Clamage Pro
    Currently Being Moderated
    The article you quote was my best guess in May 2008.

    Right now, I can tell you this:

    The next C++ standard, known informally as C++0X, is now planned for publication at the end of 2011. Some compiler vendors choose to implement features early. They either expect the features not to change, or don't mind changing the behavior of the compiler to match the evolving standard. g++ in particular does the community a great service by implementing features early; it helps to expose both the strong and weak points of the C++ draft standard. And the g++ compiler behavior can change as the standard evolves.

    To provide the best support for our enterprise customers, Sun historically favored stability over leading-edge features. Customers with huge installed code bases don't like compilers that frequently change the kind of code that is allowed and disallowed. As far as I know, that will also be the continuing Oracle policy.

    The current release, Oracle Solaris Studio 12.2 with C++ 5.11, has no C++0X features.

    We plan to provide full support for C++0x in a future release. I can't say yet what the support will be in the next release, in part because we don't yet have a date for the next release. Historically, releases have been 12 to 24 months apart.

    Edited by: Steve_Clamage on Oct 28, 2010 9:24 AM

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