9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 23, 2011 10:20 AM by Dude!

    How to create Mount Point in Linux

    Priyanka Pawar
      Hi,

      I m new to Linux OS, want to install Oracle EBS R12 on OEL 5.6 . I have downloaded s/w and installed all required packages for OEL.

      Now i want to create Staging directory at location /u01/StageR12.

      Can anyone guide me for how to create Mount point /u01 and how to assign space of 53 GB to it.... ?

      Reply awaited...
        • 1. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
          Billy~Verreynne
          Priyanka Pawar wrote:

          I m new to Linux OS, want to install Oracle EBS R12 on OEL 5.6 . I have downloaded s/w and installed all required packages for OEL.
          Now i want to create Staging directory at location /u01/StageR12.
          Can anyone guide me for how to create Mount point /u01 and how to assign space of 53 GB to it.... ?
          You need to mount something at a mount point. A disk or partition or LUN. A shared NFS or Samba (Windows) drive on the network. A local USB drive. Etc.

          What device, containing 53GB, do you want to mount?

          Are you sure you want to mount a device and simply not create a directory called +/u01+ (on the root mount) and enable the local oracle o/s user to use it?

          E.g.
          // create the directory
          mkdir /u01
          
          // change the ownership to oracle for it
          // to use and create subdirs and files in it
          chown oracle.oinstall /u01
          • 2. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
            Priyanka Pawar
            53 GB is the size of installable (Oracle EBS R12). In installable notes oracle has mentioned that create folder as StageR12 at mount point /u01 and copy all downloaded files (executable) there. So is it like that /u01 is folder created at root mount point ?
            and if it is right then root (mount point) should have that much amount of space?

            m i right? please correct me if i m...
            • 3. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
              Priyanka Pawar
              53GB is size of Oracle EBS R12 software executable. I refer Oracle installable notes in that they have mentioned that copy all executable in directory StageR12 at mount point /u01. i.e. /u01/StageR12.
              So according to you /u01 is directory mounted at root right? they it should have that much space to copy all executable ? right
              • 4. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                Dude!
                You mount a device not a directory. Let's say you have a disk of 53 GB and it's partition or device name is /dev/sdb1. To mount and access this partition you will need to initialize it (create a filesystem on the partition) and then mount it into an existing directory, which can be anywhere, e.g. /u01, or /external/u01. E.g. mount /dev/sdb1 /u01. To access the disk you then simply use the /u01 path.
                • 5. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                  Priyanka Pawar
                  ok .. having 2 Hard disks of size 250GB and 200GB, so what i need to do is

                  1. While doing installation of OS need to create 2 partitions under Device "Hard Drives " along with others which are required,
                  e.g. Device Mount Point Type Size
                  /dev/sdb1 /boot ext3 102 MB
                  /dev/sdb2 / ext3 51200 MB
                  /dev/sdb3 / ext3 307200 MB

                  2. After completion of OS installation will create 2 Directories at root,
                  $ mkdir /u01
                  $ mount /dev/sdb2 /u01

                  $mkdir /u02
                  $ mount /dev/sdb3 /u02

                  3. After that will start using that mount points like /u01 for storing Setup files e.g. /u01/StageR12/ and /u02 for Oracle EBS R12 installation e.g. /u02/OraApps/

                  m i on right path?
                  • 6. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                    Billy~Verreynne
                    You're on the right path.

                    Keep in mind though what you need partition wise just for o/s install. You should have at least 3 partitions:
                    - a ?? GB partition for the / (root) mount (the size depends on what you will install and how much space you will need for running that s/w)
                    - a 128MB or larger partition for the /boot mount
                    - a ?? GB partition as swap space mount (typically rule of thumb is 2x RAM for 4GB and lower, else around 25% of total RAM)

                    I would not create separate partitions for the old-style +/u01+ mount points for Oracle. That part of the OFA (Oracle Flexible Architecture) standards are old and pre-ASM and pre- automated Oracle managed data files.

                    You need space for installing an Oracle Home. I do not see the need for a dedicated mount point for that. I use the root file system.

                    You need space for the actual database. If you use Oracle ASM, then I would create raw partitions (across disks) to be used for database storage. These will not be mounted or formatted. Instead these will be assigned to an ASM diskgroup (and striped by default) and used for database storage.

                    If you do not use ASM, then you need a cooked file system for storage of database file. In that case separate mount point(s) make sense. Also, it makes sense not to manually apply the old OFA standards, but instead use Oracle managed database files. In that case you need a single mount point (e.g.<i>/oracledb</i>) - and set that as the base directory for Oracle to use for the database. Oracle will create an OFA compliant database directory tree and files under that base directory/mount point.

                    Keep in mind that the more mount points you have for the database, the more difficult your job becomes to manage storage. The easiest is a single mount point for the database and using Oracle to manage the OFA compliant side for you on that mount point.

                    Also, you cannot and should not attempt some kind of manual striping layout of the database across multiple mountpoints. This may have made some sense back 10+ years ago. It no longer does.
                    1 person found this helpful
                    • 7. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                      Priyanka Pawar
                      okay... yes actually there is no need to create two mount points here like /u01 and /u02. I can create directory as /u01 at root level and store my setup files there too no issues.

                      But as far as Oracle EBS installation is concern I m not doing it manually so definitely Oracle will use OFA structure for managing Directory structure and installation of software, the reason behind creation of separate mount point is to provide Base Directory for further installation procedure.

                      What do you suggest, can i assign total space required for setup files and Software installation to root directory and after that instead of creating separate mount points just to create two directories as /u01 and /u02 and proceed with my work ?
                      • 8. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                        Billy~Verreynne
                        Cannot comment on EBS - have never installed it.

                        Our complete end-to-end application and business layers are inside the database as PL/SQL code. So the app and business layer scales with the database. And as we use RAC, we leverage the scalability, high availability and redundancy features that comes with the database layer, for the app and business layers too. A lot more flexible and significant simpler and more elegant than separating these layers into separate s/w stacks and then separating these over (slow) hardware boundaries - dealing with increased licensing and h/w costs, dealing with multiple different languages for development, having to troubleshoot and administer several s/w stacks, etc. etc.

                        In our case the only external moving part is standard Apache. So no need for EBS.. nor the slightest hint of desire to install it either. :-)
                        • 9. Re: How to create Mount Point in Linux
                          Dude!
                          I'd say it depends on the size of your root partition. What is your output of "df -h" command? If root is too small to store several GB of data, then you will either need to resize your root partiton, or mount another disk into i.e. /u01. It may also work to create a symlink and have /u01 point to a directory on another existing disks, e.g. ln -s /big_disk/u01 /u01

                          Edited by: Dude on Mar 23, 2011 3:17 AM