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11 Replies Latest reply: Jun 10, 2011 6:25 AM by gimbal2 RSS

good book on creating java app

804267 Newbie
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anyone know any good book on creating desktop apps using java? the whole stack.
  • 1. Re: good book on creating java app
    gimbal2 Guru
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    The whole stack? No of course not. You'd end up with a book that killed the rain forest. You'll have to get several books covering specific topics. To know which ones you'll have to be more specific - a lot more specific.

    You want to learn the Java language? You want to learn how to create client applications using Swing? Web applications using some framework? Full blown JEE applications perhaps? JavaFX2 maybe? J2ME applications? Android applications?
  • 2. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    killed the rain forrest? that bad, huh?
    What I want is a simple desktop app that pulls data from DB and save data to DB. you know, the standard server-client interaction. It reminds me of my former sidekick named Visual Basic 6.0 and SQL Server 2000. in VB 6.0 (hopefully you've heard of that), I already have the whole stack in one package (including the IDE). I just need to compile, and it will produce exe files. I'll put these exe files in the server, and put the shortcuts targetting these exe files in client PCs, and we're ready to roll. So, what's your recommendation for this kind of architecture? thanks
  • 3. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    And yes, I've heard swing and AWT o several occasions. Are they meant to build java desktop? for web you use JSP and servlet right? so are they the correct tech for java desktop apps? or are there other tech exist that's better than them? thanks
  • 4. Re: good book on creating java app
    gimbal2 Guru
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    801264 wrote:
    killed the rain forrest? that bad, huh?
    What I want is a simple desktop app that pulls data from DB and save data to DB. you know, the standard server-client interaction. It reminds me of my former sidekick named Visual Basic 6.0 and SQL Server 2000. in VB 6.0 (hopefully you've heard of that), I already have the whole stack in one package (including the IDE). I just need to compile, and it will produce exe files. I'll put these exe files in the server, and put the shortcuts targetting these exe files in client PCs, and we're ready to roll. So, what's your recommendation for this kind of architecture? thanks
    So in fact when you mean "full stack", you are referring to the compiler, an IDE and some sort of database? For the Java platform there are a few IDEs, with Netbeans and Eclipse being the most often used ones. Both can be used to build most, if not any, type of java application you can think of. If you are starting out I would seriously recommend you to NOT start with an IDE though, start from the command line using the basic java tools (java, javac and jar). Get to know the tools and the basics of Java before an IDE starts too hide too many details from you.

    Client technology for Java is split into two "camps" right now; you have the old but robust Swing and you have the budding new JavaFX, where JavaFX 2 is now in beta and promises great things. JavaFX is more aimed to be competition for Silverlight though; if you look for something that matches Visual Basic more closely then a plain old Java application using Swing technology may be more what you are looking for.

    As for databases; take your pick. If you like SQL server, just use it.
  • 5. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    Uh-uh, I'm not a beginner anymore. I'm OCPJP 6 now, so I'm quite familiar with Java basics. So I should lean on Swing rather than AWT? As for JavaFX, perhaps I should wait till it's a little bit more stable. because, you see, it's still a new tech. while Swing and awt has been around for ages. Right?
  • 6. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    and what's the good IDE that provides visual GUI development? thanks
  • 7. Re: good book on creating java app
    gimbal2 Guru
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    801264 wrote:
    Uh-uh, I'm not a beginner anymore. I'm OCPJP 6 now, so I'm quite familiar with Java basics. So I should lean on Swing rather than AWT? As for JavaFX, perhaps I should wait till it's a little bit more stable. because, you see, it's still a new tech. while Swing and awt has been around for ages. Right?
    Strange questions for someone who is OCPJP, I would expect you to know such trivial details. Yes use Swing rather than the seriously outdated AWT. I would agree holding off on JavaFX for serious production usage right now, but it cannot hurt to investigate it for future usage.

    As for the question of which IDE; that basically boils down to two things.

    1) DO NOT use a visual editor, learn to create the GUI through code. First understand how it works, or the visual editor is not going to be able to help you. After all you are the captain and the tool is only a tool, you shouldn't be aiming to reverse that relationship. Only when you know how to do it blindfolded should you consider visual editors, but by then they will probably be more of a hindrance than an aid. Of course for rapid prototyping they are still good. The online swing tutorial is your best bet to get going with Swing:

    http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/

    2) the rest boils down to "which IDE should I use" - nobody can answer that but you. Try them both and see which one is more to your liking. I can only give you my personal opinion, and that is that I like Netbeans more for client side / game development and I like Eclipse more for enterprise / web development; I use them both. Eclipse I have to enrich with a few plugins before I'm happy though.
  • 8. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    But, let's take a quick look on JavaFX. Is it suited to create desktop apps? I always thought it's best suited to build RIAs (i.e. web apps). CMIIW.
  • 9. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    what do you think about SWT/JFace? how do they compare to Swing?
  • 10. Re: good book on creating java app
    804267 Newbie
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    so? any good books on how to make database apps with swing? as for the DB, I already master it, so I need only the guide for UI. What I need are :
    1. If you're familiar with a parent form that contains other forms in VB 6, that's what I need
    2. Standard combo, drop down, table, DTPicker, textbox, checkbox, radio button, button, etc. As for the table(datagrid), I need the columns to be able to be embedded with other components such as radio button, button or DTPicker. (In VB6, it's called DTPicker. I don't know the equivalent in Java).
    Thanks
  • 11. Re: good book on creating java app
    gimbal2 Guru
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    Java is not Visual Basic or .NET, so stop making comparisons. Forget that Visual Basic even exists. Java is not technology that is streamlined into a neat package with a rule book attached to it; Java is technology developed by hundreds of different sources aiming at maximum flexibility and capability, which ultimately requires great skill and knowledge from people wanting to actually use it.

    You are not looking for a book on how to do database apps with Swing, you are looking for a book on how to do Swing (use the link I provided) and a book on how to do JDBC. The latter really isn't all that special when you are already familiar with database programming already, I would simply try to work it out from internet examples.

    And from that, you use your programming skills and experience to put the two together.

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