3 Replies Latest reply: Apr 26, 2012 11:16 AM by clcarter RSS

    Oracle Database Express Edition -> is there a sqlnet.ora file?

    933068
      Hallo everyone,

      if I installed it in a Windows OS, where can I find this file? Thanks

      Regards,
      Leo
        • 1. Re: Oracle Database Express Edition -> is there a sqlnet.ora file?
          clcarter
          Yes if installer successfully completes all its tasks. Even if it does not finish some chores, any client installation should have a sqlnet.ora file, and any ORACLE_HOME installation should have a client.

          To find out where it is, use the tnsping command. You can try a `tnsping xe`, or a `tnsping dummy`, or `tnsping ijustmadeupaname`. But it will reveal the path to sqlnet.ora (and same location for tnsnames.ora also).
          $ tnsping xe
          ...
          Used parameter files:
          <%ORACLE_HOME%>\network\admin\sqlnet.ora
          ... used TNSNAMES adapter to resolve ...
          ... attempting to contact (DESCRIPTION=...
          OK (N msec) # or some other TNS error
          • 2. Re: Oracle Database Express Edition -> is there a sqlnet.ora file?
            933068
            Thanks clcaster,

            I found the sqlnet.ora file:

            # This file is actually generated by netca. But if customers choose to
            # install "Software Only", this file wont exist and without the native
            # authentication, they will not be able to connect to the database on NT.

            SQLNET.AUTHENTICATION_SERVICES = (NTS)

            does it mean, that with the Express Edition, I wont be able to connect to my Oracle DB from another computer?

            Thanks..
            • 3. Re: Oracle Database Express Edition -> is there a sqlnet.ora file?
              clcarter
              connect to my Oracle DB from another computer?
              Yes you can. If you allow it, any remote machine with a correct client configuration can connect to the database.

              The client needs to know three pieces of information to connect to a remote database.

              1. hostname: where does the remote database 'live'. Or the host IP address might be used instead.
              2. port number: a listener services remote connection requests by monitoring a specific port
              3. %ORACLE_SID% or database service name

              And actually four/five bits of info as well- database username, and password.

              If you don't want remote connections, stop the listener service. Doing so will not affect current remote connections, but it will prevent new connections from accessing the database.