13 Replies Latest reply: Dec 12, 2012 9:03 AM by Mark Malakanov (user11181920) RSS

    Oracle Virtualbox

    user12050217
      Hello,

      I installed Oracle Virtualbox and created Windows 8 Pro 64 bit on my windows 7 64 bit machine. Now I want to install oracle 11gR2 on Windows 8, but when I inserted my dvd in dvd rom, it is not showing all the files and folder of my dvd which are showing in host (Windows 7). Ok no problem, I will copy and paste 11gR2's two zip files on another dvd and then will try to install. But here my questions are :

      1.Why windows 8 is not showing all the files and folder in virtual environment? (Not an Oracle issue, but if someone can help though)
      2.When I checked the IP of windows 8 virtual machine, its IP is different i.e. something 10.0.2.15 while my host machine's IP is something like 196.168.X.Y. So my question is how connectivity will happen between two databases of two different networks?

      Thanks.
        • 1. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
          Osama_Mustafa
          ORACLE IS NOT CERTIFIED WITH WINDOWS 8 Choose another OS
          • 2. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
            HuaMin Chen
            Yes, you cannot try 11gR2 in Win 08. You can try Oracle Linux 5 or 6, which is downloadable.

            Edited by: HuaMin Chen on Dec 11, 2012 6:17 PM
            • 3. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
              user12050217
              Can you please give me doc link for certified OSs for Oracle 11.2.0.1.

              Thanks.
              • 4. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                Osama_Mustafa
                user12050217 wrote:
                Can you please give me doc link for certified OSs for Oracle 11.2.0.1.

                Thanks.
                Do you MOS Account

                If yes :
                http://support.oracle.com
                -Enter your username / password
                -You will find Certification Tab choose it and enter your Database version and your OS

                if no check this blog its old but useful
                http://blog.ronnyegner-consulting.de/2009/11/02/oracle-database-and-operating-support-matrix
                • 5. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                  user12050217
                  Thanks.
                  Do you MOS Account
                  No, sorry.

                  Kindly give me doc link for certified OSs for 11.2.0.1 please.

                  Thanks.
                  • 6. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                    Osama_Mustafa
                    http://blog.ronnyegner-consulting.de/2009/11/02/oracle-database-and-operating-support-matrix
                    • 7. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                      EdStevens
                      user12050217 wrote:
                      Hello,

                      I installed Oracle Virtualbox and created Windows 8 Pro 64 bit on my windows 7 64 bit machine. Now I want to install oracle 11gR2 on Windows 8, but when I inserted my dvd in dvd rom, it is not showing all the files and folder of my dvd which are showing in host (Windows 7). Ok no problem, I will copy and paste 11gR2's two zip files on another dvd and then will try to install. But here my questions are :

                      1.Why windows 8 is not showing all the files and folder in virtual environment? (Not an Oracle issue, but if someone can help though)
                      I don't know the direct answer. I don't know exactly what you are doing or what you are seeing. But as others have said, Win8 is not yet certified for any oracle product, so you are headed down a road wherin lie monsters.
                      2.When I checked the IP of windows 8 virtual machine, its IP is different i.e. something 10.0.2.15 while my host machine's IP is something like 196.168.X.Y. So my question is how connectivity will happen between two databases of two different networks?
                      Your virtual machine is a different system. It has its own ip address. This is a key concept. Every machine has to have its own IP address.

                      When any virtualization software is installed, be it Virtual Box, VMware or Ralph's Pretty Good Virtualizer, it will install a network adapter on the host os. You can see that by opening a command prompt on the host and issuing 'ipconfig'. This adapter acts as a virtual router to the virtual machine. When you configure the virtual NIC on the virtual machine, you specify if you want Network Address Translation, Hostonly, or Bridged.

                      Network Address Translation (NAT) means the vm (actually, that particular NIC) can initiate communication with the network on which the host sits, but the host will pass those requests using its (the hosts) own ip address. The vm in effect hides behind the host's ip address.
                      Hostonly means the configured NIC can communicate only with the host os or other vms on the same host.
                      Bridged means the vm gets an IP addres on the same subnet as the host, and is fully visible to the host's network.

                      When I configure a vm on my desktop (and I've done scores of them over the last few years, using both VMworkstation and Virtual Box) I have a few non-negotiable items relating to networking.
                      1- the vm must be able to communicate with the internet, so that it can access a yum server for package installation and update
                      2- It must be invisible to the hosts network. The network admins must never know it's there.
                      3- It must have a fixed ip address - NOT dhchp assigned.

                      Items one and two are achieved with NAT. Unfortunately, the way Virtual Box implemented it's networking, NAT requires a dhcp assigned address, which is mutually exclusive with item three. My solution is this:
                      1- when creating the VM (before installation of the OS) create two NICs. The first will default to NAT. Configure the second as 'hostonly'.
                      2- when configuring the OS (during installation) enable eth0 (the NAT nic) to activate on startup and support ipv4. Configure eth1 (hostonly) to enable on startup, support ipv4, have a fixed IP address. The ip address must be in the same subnet as defined by the VBox adapter on the host. If 'ipconfig' shows this adapter at 192.168.56.1, then the vm must have an ip address in the range 192.168.56.2-255

                      Thanks.
                      • 8. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                        Srini Chavali-Oracle
                        Certified OS versions are documented in the Install Guides - http://www.oracle.com/pls/db112/portal.portal_db?selected=11&frame=

                        HTH
                        Srini
                        • 9. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                          user12050217
                          Hello sir,

                          Can you please point me a doc link by which I may know all the OS which are certified for Oracle 11.2.0.1. I searched in your provided link, but not exactly which I am looking please.
                          • 10. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                            Srini Chavali-Oracle
                            You will have to search by OS

                            For Linux - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/install.112/e24321/pre_install.htm#CIHFICFD
                            For Windows - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/install.112/e24186/reqs.htm#CHDHGGFE
                            For Solaris - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/install.112/e24346/pre_install.htm#CIHFICFD
                            For HP-UX - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/install.112/e24336/pre_install.htm#CIHFICFD
                            For AIX - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/install.112/e24332/pre_install.htm#CIHFICFD

                            HTH
                            Srini
                            • 11. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                              user12050217
                              Thank you very much sir for such a great links. One should always run oracle on certified os only, to avoid unnecessary errors.

                              I wish to see couple of more os like ubuntu, fedora etc.
                              • 12. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                                EdStevens
                                user12050217 wrote:
                                Thank you very much sir for such a great links. One should always run oracle on certified os only, to avoid unnecessary errors.

                                I wish to see couple of more os like ubuntu, fedora etc.
                                Why? Oracle themselves provide a perfectly good Linux, built on Red Hat. What would be the advantage to them of supporting other Linux distros? If the customer is going to run a linux, what would be the advantage to them of "needing" to run some other distro?

                                Oracle already supports more platforms than either of their major competitors. MS SQL Server runs only on Windows, and while IBM has a DB2 on multiple platforms they aren't exactly the same product.
                                • 13. Re: Oracle Virtualbox
                                  Mark Malakanov (user11181920)
                                  I wish to see couple of more os like ubuntu, fedora etc.
                                  I also would like to see them.
                                  And I believe you can run Oracle on Ubuntu and even on some not cutting edge Fedoras. Depending on proper libs available.
                                  Lack of certification does not necessary mean Oracle will not work on such systems. I means it is not thoroughly tested and may not work properly in some places. Such "some" places are usually where Oracle interacts with OS - system call libs : I/O libs, memory management libs, network libs, interprocess communication libs etc. Oracle is built to communicate with OS via certain libs, precisely via functions with specific signatures. Oracle OS call may fail if current OS lib function signature differs with what it expects.
                                  You can try Oracle on Win8 and you may see many such errors in alert log.

                                  Fedora is very advanced OS. Too innovative. Redhat uses it to "test" some new technologies they apply later in their mainstream RH Linux. Oracle may not be ready for some very new changes.

                                  For some very new OS lib functions often "adapters" exist - compatibility libs. These libs translate old OS calls to new OS calls. Installing such packages may help Oracle (and other software) to work with newer OS via OS functions with older signatures.

                                  If you are a real enthusiast of Linux and Oracle you can try to install it on very new Fedora or Ubuntu, just for exercise, but do not expect production support from Oracle.

                                  Edited by: user11181920 on Dec 12, 2012 10:03 AM